Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHealth England
IN THE NEWS

Health England

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
March 23, 1999 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British health authorities have rejected a drug company's proposal to resume selling the controversial diabetes pill Rezulin in the United Kingdom, it was announced Monday. The Medicines Control Agency rejected the application by Glaxo Wellcome, which holds the license to market the drug in Britain and elsewhere in Europe. The agency is Britain's counterpart to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 23, 1999 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British health authorities have rejected a drug company's proposal to resume selling the controversial diabetes pill Rezulin in the United Kingdom, it was announced Monday. The Medicines Control Agency rejected the application by Glaxo Wellcome, which holds the license to market the drug in Britain and elsewhere in Europe. The agency is Britain's counterpart to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
Advertisement
HEALTH
February 2, 1998 | SALLY SQUIRES, WASHINGTON POST
Since 1992, the American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended that babies be placed on their backs to sleep to help reduce the risk of SIDS, a condition that claims about 3,000 infants per year in the United States. A number of studies have shown that sleeping on the back, the supine position, is safer for infants than sleeping on their stomachs, the prone position.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 2013 | By Nicole Sperling
For many parents of young children, the battle over limiting little ones' time with iPads and other mobile devices is difficult and seemingly unending. They can serve as fantastic baby sitters in a pinch, but the soulless gaze they can prompt in children can be downright terrifying. A number of scientific studies have raised red flags; this summer Public Health England, for instance, warned that children who spend more time watching screens tend to have higher levels of emotional distress, anxiety and depression.
HEALTH
June 30, 2008 | Judy Foreman, Special to The Times
To read the Internet ads, you'd think that our bodies were awash in "toxins" -- usually unspecified -- and that we should therefore go to dramatic lengths, such as "colon cleansing" and chelation, to get rid of all this bad stuff. Don't believe it. Or to put it more gently, don't risk your health or your pocketbook on programs that promise to "detoxify" you -- not without doing your homework first. For starters, ask exactly what these supposed "toxins" are.
NEWS
May 15, 2001 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Imagine what Julia Roberts' acceptance speech would have been if she'd known she was winning not just an Academy Award but a better chance of living to a ripe old age. That may be what she is getting, according to a new study, which reports that Oscar winners, on average, live 3.9 years longer than non-winners of similar ages who have acted in the same movies. Four years may not sound like a lot, but a 3.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|