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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1986 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
The whirr of the blender blades was gone, replaced Monday afternoon with the pounding of hammers and the screech of nails being wrenched from secure berths in the weathered clapboard of the now-defunct Orange Inn. The historic shanty, which dispensed fresh guava shakes and cottage-cheese-and-cucumber sandwiches on a barren stretch of Coast Highway for nearly two generations, was being dismantled board by board.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 1989 | CHARLES PERRY
Recently we discussed how the Chinese make the most of vegetables, using the Fragrant Vegetable as a prime local example. But there's more to vegetarian cooking than mushrooms and mock meats. Health food chefs should get their act together about how they use grains. The things they serve now are a scandal: stodgy brown rice pilaf, sullen breads you could use as a doorstop, sludgy tabbouleh. Maybe (getting a little daring) a whole-wheat tortilla now and again. So go, health food chefs.
NEWS
December 15, 1993 | From Associated Press
The Food and Drug Administration offered assurances Tuesday that dietary supplements will remain widely available, even though it will soon be able to regulate the claims on their labels for the first time. A moratorium that barred the FDA from regulating vitamins, minerals, herbs, amino acids and other health food store staples expires today.
NEWS
November 5, 2010 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
You may love the KFC Double Down , that pseudo-sandwich that dispenses with bread and uses fried chicken breasts to hold the bacon, cheese and sauce together. Or, you may love to hate the Double Down. After all, this reaction from a commentor named “Sarah” is hardly uncommon: “Just looking at this sandwich makes me want to vomit.” But a trio of Canadian doctors has a message for those who think they’re too good to partake of this culinary oddity – keep it in perspective.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
Timothy Hollingsworth, the 33-year-old chef de cuisine at the French Laundry , is moving to Los Angeles. But don't get your hopes too high. He doesn't have a restaurant planned - not yet, anyway. Hollingsworth announced in November that he would be leaving the Laundry in spring. At the time he told the San Francisco Chronicle's Paolo Lucchesi that he was playing with an idea of opening a more casual and popular type of restaurant, maybe even a spin on Mexican. He's still thinking about doing something like that, but first he's going to be working in video production.
NEWS
April 22, 2004 | Robin Rauzi
Laura Kightlinger is an extreme hyphenate: producer, actress, stand-up comic and documentarian. In addition to her consulting producer duties on NBC's "Will & Grace," she has a recurring role as Nurse Sheila. Her documentary "60 Spins Around the Sun" is playing at festivals, and she's just finished a role in the movie "Kicking & Screaming" with Will Ferrell. She jokes that she and boyfriend Jack Black are "a couple in our 90s" and that she "tries to keep my cats' 16-hour sleep schedule."
BUSINESS
July 24, 1996 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Goodbye, Mrs. Gooch. The name of that Southern California pioneer of eating right, Sandy Gooch, disappears today from the signs of the natural food stores she sold three years ago to the fast-growing Whole Foods Markets chain out of Austin, Texas. The name change signals a shift in direction after a restructuring of the Southern California operation, which has most recently been known as Mrs. Gooch's Whole Foods.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1991 | LAURIE OCHOA and * Carrots, 2834 Santa Monica Blvd., Santa Monica. (213) 453-6505. Entrees $12.50-$20.50. and
L.A.'s best new restaurant is not in a million-dollar architectural space. It is not in a "hot" location. It does not have important artists' work on the walls. It does not have an Armani-suited maitre d' to sneer at your year-old Walter Steiger flats. Carrots is in a Santa Monica Boulevard strip mall--the best table offers a view of the doughnut shop cater-corner to the restaurant. And it is the food, for the most part carrot-free, that makes this modest storefront an important restaurant.
NEWS
November 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
Federal and state health officials on Friday worked to discover what caused an outbreak of a rare and sometimes fatal blood disorder. Thirty-one cases had been reported by Friday in six widely scattered states, including 21 in New Mexico, as health authorities sought to determine if the outbreak was linked to the use of L-Tryptophan, an amino acid dietary supplement. The disease, eosinophilia, is characterized by high counts of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell.
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