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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 1985
I seriously question the conclusion that Quiroz would have "been a lot better off if his department had not received over $20 million in new state funds this year." This new funding was far from being a windfall or a "real bonus." Every bit of it, and more, was needed to address the urgent priorities we have in creating a sound and effective mental health system for our county. It is clear to me that if the governor had not vetoed $28 million for Community Mental Health and $34 million for Shelter for the Homeless, Quiroz' first year as our county mental health director would have been smoother and less surrounded by controversy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2013 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO - Senate leader Darrell Steinberg (D-Sacramento) said Thursday that he will seek to restore a state program that funded county services for mentally ill people who run afoul of the law. After a decade of state funding, the Mentally Ill Offender Crime Reduction Grants ceased in 2008 due to budget cuts. Steinberg wants to restore funding, starting with $50 million in the next budget year. But that money is contingent on whether Gov. Jerry Brown receives a delay in a federal court order to reduce state prison crowding.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1987 | TED VOLLMER and HARRY NELSON, Times Staff Writers
Gov. George Deukmejian's vetoes sent Los Angeles County's health system reeling Wednesday with grave predictions that the budget slashes could further jeopardize a shrinking trauma care network and lead to deep cuts in many other vital health services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- Nearly a decade after California voters approved a multibillion-dollar tax increase to improve mental health programs, the state has failed to provide proper oversight of county programs funded by Proposition 63, a state audit concluded Thursday. State Auditor Elaine Howle looked at the last six years during which time almost $7.4 billion from the Mental Health Services Act (MHSA) was directed to counties for mental health programs. “This report concludes that Mental Health [Department]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1988
Your coverage of the hearing of the County Board of Supervisors on mental health funding is much appreciated (Metro, June 16). The closing of any of the present mental health clinics and services would be a real disservice to both the clients and the communities. It is a fact that the current number of facilities is inadequate to care for the thousands of patients in need of treatment. Closing even a few will cause extreme hardship for the clients who will be turned away as well as for the remaining facilities forced to take up the slack.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 1988
In your otherwise excellent editorial "Health on the Line" (June 18), you have left out one state health-funding priority--that of increasing fees for doctors and other service providers who accept Medi-Cal. Medi-Cal is the health system for low-income disabled, infants, children and seniors. The provider fees are now so low that most doctors will no longer accept Medi-Cal. Therefore, many Medi-Cal recipients (particularly those who need specialist doctors) are going without any care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1992
While I appreciate the difficulties confronting the Los Angeles County mental health system ("Mental Patients Overload County Emergency System," March 12), it is unfair to characterize the cause as dependence on sales tax revenues. Yes, sales tax revenues are down and we face some difficult times. But it's important not to lose sight of the fact that without realignment, what today is a struggle instead could well have been a burial for public mental health services in California. Times are difficult, both for individuals and for governments.
OPINION
February 9, 2012
Just as scientists are announcing a breakthrough in their understanding of howAlzheimer'sspreads through the brain, robbing its sufferers of memories and cognitive functioning, the Obama administration is proposing a dramatic increase in federal funding for Alzheimer's research. The president's budget for fiscal year 2013 is expected to request $80 million more than the $458 million currently allocated. It calls for an additional $26 million in funds to help support families and others who take on the task of caring for people with Alzheimer's.
NEWS
June 24, 1989 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, Times Staff Writer
An Assembly-Senate conference committee moved closer to agreement on a compromise state budget of nearly $50 billion Friday, but still faced the problem of having to pare back at least $550 million in spending to bring it in line with Gov. George Deukmejian's spending target. Continuing to wade through more than 700 pages of budget papers, the six-member committee so far has made decisions on hundreds of items but still is roughly $550 million short of producing a budget with the $1.2-billion reserve that Deukmejian is demanding.
OPINION
October 26, 2002
The Times is right in saying the federal government must step up to the plate and stop discriminating against people with mental illness ("A Deadly Group Home," editorial, Oct. 21). The discrimination comes from a little-known restriction in Medicaid known as the Institutions for Mental Diseases exclusion. While the federal insurance plan will pay for hospital care beyond 30 days for people with other medical disorders (strokes and Parkinson's are examples), it excludes payment for long-term care of people with brain disorders such as schizophrenia.
NATIONAL
May 8, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The battle over President Obama's plan to keep interest rates low on federal student loans escalated Tuesday as Senate Republicans blocked a Democratic proposal to tax higher-income individuals to pay for it. Republicans also want to avoid raising the rate on college loans, but would pay for it by eliminating a public health fund in Obama's new healthcare law. The stalemate comes as both parties turn routine legislative votes...
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- As the battle intensifies over keeping student loan interest rates low, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi called the Republican plan to gut a public health fund to pay for it “another assault on women's health.” Republicans want to eliminate what they call a “slush fund” established under the nation's new healthcare law to pay for keeping student loan rates low, and House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) has proposed taking $6 billion from the fund to pay for the costs of avoiding a loan rate hike this summer.
OPINION
February 9, 2012
Just as scientists are announcing a breakthrough in their understanding of howAlzheimer'sspreads through the brain, robbing its sufferers of memories and cognitive functioning, the Obama administration is proposing a dramatic increase in federal funding for Alzheimer's research. The president's budget for fiscal year 2013 is expected to request $80 million more than the $458 million currently allocated. It calls for an additional $26 million in funds to help support families and others who take on the task of caring for people with Alzheimer's.
BUSINESS
May 1, 2011 | By Andrew Leckey
Question: I am disappointed with my shares of Avon Products Inc. What do you think is next for the company? Answer: Investors expect the stock of a brand-name company to be sturdy and reliable through all market conditions, come rain or shine. But the prospects of the world's largest direct marketer of cosmetics, fragrances and skin care have been cloudy, with some storm activity. Avon markets to women in more than 100 countries through about 6.5 million independent sales representatives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 2009 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Los Angeles County supervisors on Tuesday approved $44.8 million in extra funding for dozens of private clinics that treat the growing ranks of uninsured patients. The county has been reimbursing clinics for primary care, dental and specialty medical services for the last 13 years, and currently budgets $54 million annually for payments to clinics. The new funding, which will be paid over the next three years, includes $35.5 million in services for new patients, $7.8 million for equipment and construction, and $1.5 million to create a countywide Internet-based medical records system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 2007 | Michael Rothfeld, Times Staff Writer
Assembly Speaker Fabian Nunez and Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger formally filed an initiative Friday that would finance their plan for a $14.4-billion expansion of healthcare to most Californians, in part by almost doubling the state tax on cigarettes to $1.75 a pack. The afternoon submission to the state attorney general's office sets the stage for what is expected to be a costly and contentious battle pitting the two state leaders and their allies against some powerful opponents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1987 | TED VOLLMER, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles County's system of public hospitals, clinics and other health facilities, facing more than $80 million in cuts in the next fiscal year, is confronted with another, more immediate problem: $10.2 million in budgeted funds needed for current services may not be available. The latest bad news is the result of a continuing failure by Gov. George Deukmejian and the Legislature to resolve a long-running 1986 dispute over how to finance that year's health appropriation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2007 | Scott Gold and Lee Romney, Times Staff Writers
Advocates for the mentally ill filed a lawsuit Thursday alleging that Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger subverted the will of voters when he eliminated a $55-million program for the homeless mentally ill -- a program he himself had touted as a success.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 1, 2007 | Scott Gold and Lee Romney, Times Staff Writers
A dispute over state mental health funding appears headed to court following a recent decision by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger to eliminate a successful $55-million program for mentally ill homeless people. At issue is a complex provision of Proposition 63, the 1% "millionaires' tax" approved by voters in 2004 to overhaul California's troubled and historically cash-strapped mental health system.
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