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Health Hazardous

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1990 | TOM McQUEENEY and ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A group of developers, oil companies, city insurers and others have agreed to pay almost $10 million to about 200 families to settle claims that the McColl toxic waste dump has harmed their health and property values, court documents show. In the latest round of settlements over the World War II-era dumping of aviation fuel refinery wastes at the site, Superior Court Judge Tully H. Seymour on Tuesday approved one $2.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 7, 2014 | By David Pierson
For generations, butter got a bad rap. It was thought to be cloying, fattening, dangerous for your arteries, and it took a creaming from oil-based substitutes like margarine. Now with the trans fats in those alternatives under fire, everyone from iron chefs to home cooks is reexamining butter's place on the refrigerator shelf. The yellow spread served at Joan Hemphill's Seal Beach home tastes like butter - because it is butter. "I use way too much," Hemphill concedes.
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BUSINESS
June 6, 1992 | Associated Press
A judge decided Friday to let a working mother reopen her restaurant, which had been closed by health officials who said she created a health hazard by keeping her young son on the job. Jennifer Crafts' restaurant in Chicopee was ordered closed this week after health officials declared a health emergency. She sued to demand her 11-month-old restaurant be kept open--at least until she was granted a hearing by Chicopee health officials. That hearing has been set for Wednesday.
SCIENCE
October 24, 2013 | By Tony Barboza
Wildfire smoke poses a growing health risk to millions of Americans, even for those who live hundreds of miles from the flames, a new report by an environmental group says. About two-thirds of Americans, or nearly 212 million people, lived in counties that two years ago contended with wildfire smoke linked to respiratory problems like asthma, pneumonia and chronic lung diseases, according to a report released Thursday by the Natural Resources Defense Council. The group used satellite imagery of smoke plumes from the 2011 wildfire season - one of the worst in recent years - to take a nationwide snapshot of air quality.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 1989
In an egregious case of medical misconduct that has implications for anyone who goes to a doctor, Valencia obstetrician Milos Klvana has been convicted of second-degree murder in the deaths of eight babies and a fetus. The deaths share chilling elements: parents going to Klvana's clinic, trusting him and burying a child days after birth. Evidence showed he repeatedly misused a labor-inducing drug and botched complications that required hospital care.
NEWS
September 14, 2008 | Rosie Mestel; Carla Rivera; Steve Hymon
BOOSTER SHOTS Life is a road strewn with potholes, wrong turns and tree limbs sticking out at eye height. Don't I know that. But some would argue the hazards are more plentiful and to be found in unexpected places. A PR agent tried to convince me that we are riddled with disease for one principal reason: We eat too much calcium. She turned my attention to her doctor client's book, which darkly warned -- four times by Page 18 -- that calcium is toxic: "Calcium hardens concrete.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
By the hundreds of thousands each year, they sail to Avalon by ferry and cruise ship for diving trips, glass-bottom boat tours and to lounge on the beach in the Catalina Island town 26 miles off the Southern California coast. Yet the same crystal-clear water that draws tourists also harbors an embarrassing hazard. For most of the last decade, Avalon Harbor Beach has ranked among the most polluted in the state, tainted with human sewage that puts swimmers at risk. Even though the city of 4,000 has spent $3.5 million testing and rehabilitating sewer lines, the water is no cleaner.
REAL ESTATE
December 6, 1992 | TERRI SHAW, THE WASHINGTON POST
For many Americans, pollution is a problem that begins at home. Reports of health hazards from common substances such as radon, asbestos, lead and formaldehyde have fueled homeowners' concerns about the quality of the environment within their own four walls. In response, numerous small companies are promoting home test kits for consumers to measure these toxic substances. Some, like radon kits, have been on the market a long time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1988 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, Times Staff Writer
State officials shut down an encampment of about 75 homeless people in downtown Los Angeles on Wednesday, declaring it a health and safety danger and an unacceptable use of a public park. After six months of camping at the former State Building site on 1st Street between Broadway and Spring Street, residents of the makeshift shelters were prepared for the action after being warned earlier in the week by state police that they would have to pack up and be gone by 6 a.m. Thursday.
NEWS
April 2, 1989 | KEVIN RODERICK, Times Staff Writer
Jack Riley tries to get home when he sees a dust plume rising off Owens Lake, the dry salt pan created by Los Angeles' thirst for Sierra Nevada water. The plume means swirling gray clouds of alkaline dust will soon envelop this little town, making driving dangerous and breathing unpleasant. "It's like flour," said Riley, a retired Los Angeles Department of Water and Power employee. "I just stay indoors, lock the windows, and hook up to the oxygen."
SPORTS
April 3, 2013 | By Diane Pucin
RANCHO MIRAGE -- Natalie Gulbis, the LPGA golfer who once dated Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, says she feels ready to play Thursday when the season's first women's golf major, the Kraft Nabisco Championship at Mission Hills Country Club, begins. That wasn't so certain a month ago. When the tour was in Thailand, Gulbis was bitten by a mosquito and acquired malaria. Even as recently as the Kia Classic in Carlsbad two weeks ago, Gulbis had to withdraw because of fatigue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 2013 | By Mike Anton, Los Angeles Times
Summer is nearly here, and with it the concrete fire rings at Big Corona in Newport Beach will be ablaze in a postcard-worthy California tradition as enduring as riding longboards. Picture it: Hot dogs and s'mores and flickering flames. Snuggling under blankets. Some dude strumming a guitar. Barbara Peters sees it differently: Plumes of smoke wafting back from the beach and into her home steps away from Big Corona. "At times it can get so bad that it will set off peoples' smoke detectors," Peters said.
OPINION
May 25, 2012 | By John Bateson
As San Francisco hosts a citywide birthday party for the Golden Gate Bridge's 75th anniversary, one thing that won't be celebrated is the fact that the bridge continues to be the world's top suicide site. Since it opened on May 27, 1937, there have been an estimated 1,600 deaths in which the body was recovered, and many more unconfirmed. The data for 2011 underscore this reality: 37 people died jumping off the bridge last year, according to the Golden Gate Bridge, Highway and Transportation District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2012 | By Phil Willon, Los Angeles Times
The fastest-growing county in California rejected a massive, mountaintop rock quarry Thursday that supporters called an essential source of the ingredients that fed the region's economic ascent. In the end, however, neighborhood objections to increased traffic, possible health hazards and environmental destruction won out, a rare outcome in the pro-development frontier of the Inland Empire. Fierce opposition in Temecula, a city known for its vineyard-covered valley and rock-ribbed conservative politics, persuaded the Riverside County Board of Supervisors to vote down the proposed rock mine by a 3-2 vote, despite the promise of hundreds of new blue-collar jobs to the recession-flattened region.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
By the hundreds of thousands each year, they sail to Avalon by ferry and cruise ship for diving trips, glass-bottom boat tours and to lounge on the beach in the Catalina Island town 26 miles off the Southern California coast. Yet the same crystal-clear water that draws tourists also harbors an embarrassing hazard. For most of the last decade, Avalon Harbor Beach has ranked among the most polluted in the state, tainted with human sewage that puts swimmers at risk. Even though the city of 4,000 has spent $3.5 million testing and rehabilitating sewer lines, the water is no cleaner.
SCIENCE
June 4, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
There is disagreement on the potential health hazards of the spilled oil polluting the Gulf of Mexico. Some scientists predict medical problems among workers involved in the cleanup and even the general public. Others expect safety precautions ordered by the federal government to protect cleanup workers and the public from harm. Concerns over the health effects of the spill grew this week as more workers and residents of the coastal areas reported symptoms such as headaches and breathing problems.
NEWS
December 15, 1994
The Los Angeles Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals/Southern California Humane Society is asking pet owners to take special care to guard against injuries to their pets during the holidays. The SPCA/SCHS reports that every year cats, dogs and other pets suffer from poisoning, electrical burns or digestive problems as a result of nibbling on poinsettias, tripping over light bulbs and eating tinsel.
NEWS
March 1, 1987 | DELTHIA RICKS, United Press International
On July 16, 1969, three American astronauts set out on a 165-hour, 18-minute mission that remains the highlight of the U.S. space program: the first landing on the moon. Now, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is planning a voyage in the year 2005 to the red planet, Mars, a 35-million mile trip that will make the moon mission look like a drive to the corner market.
SCIENCE
April 16, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
The massive billow of dust from an Icelandic volcano is pretty much a run-of-the-mill ash cloud that is a concern primarily because of its location and the prevailing winds, which are forcing it into transatlantic air lanes and over European airports, experts said Thursday. Except for the immediate vicinity of the volcano, the eruption is unlikely to produce long-term climatic or health effects unless there is a sharp change in the amount of material emitted, researchers said. Volcanic eruptions "are such a complicated natural phenomenon that almost every one is unique . . . and the amount of ash produced during a given eruption or the length of the eruption is really something that we can't predict," said Earth scientist Olivier Bachmann of the University of Washington.
OPINION
June 2, 2009 | Gina M. Solomon, Gina M. Solomon is a physician and senior scientist at the Natural Resources Defense Council. She is also an associate clinical professor of medicine at UC San Francisco and director of its occupational and environmental medicine residency program.
Under the cloak of the budget crisis, the Schwarzenegger administration is proposing to eliminate an office that has effectively taken on some of California's most insidious polluters, the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, or OEHHA. This small, independent office of health scientists contained in the state's Environmental Protection Agency is a strange target if the goal is truly to save money.
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