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Health Horizons

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NEWS
March 21, 1993
What if your dentist had false teeth? Or your golf pro sliced like Gerald Ford? Or your daughter's driving instructor papered his office wall with his own traffic violations? To put it mildly, it might lower their credibility in your eyes. Well that's how many of us feel when we're told to lose weight by a doctor whose belt would stretch from Philippe's to Junior's.
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BUSINESS
February 24, 2004 | Lisa Girion, Times Staff Writer
Molina Healthcare Inc. said Monday that it had agreed to buy a New Mexico managed-care company for $69 million as part of an effort to expand its Medicaid market. The Long Beach health maintenance organization, which specializes in serving the poor and people on Medicaid, said the acquisition of Health Care Horizons of Albuquerque should begin boosting earnings as soon as it closes in the third quarter of this year.
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NEWS
October 6, 1991 | PAUL LIEBERMAN, Lieberman is a Times staff writer
There it was. Unmistakably, undeniably, indisputably--a new symptom. I had my wife check it out to make sure I wasn't crazy, guiding her hand to the spot near the base of my right breast. She felt it too. A lump. A lump in my male breast. "It's probably nothing," she said. "But you better get it checked." "I know," I said. I also knew, in the manic recesses of my consciousness, that the prognosis was bleak. I develop a fatal illness every two years. I've been doing it for three decades now.
NEWS
June 5, 1995
"Health Horizons," a special section on the job market for health professionals, appears today as Part II of Business. It looks at areas where business is booming.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | STEFI WEISBURD, Weisburd is a free - lance science and medicine writer living in Albuquerque. and
For as long as she can remember, 35-year-old Virginia Schultz has been plagued by asthma, sinus infections and allergies. For years she survived woozily on cocktails of antihistamines, decongestants and steroids. She endured unusually long regimens of allergy shots, which twice sent her into anaphylactic shock. Then came a hellacious string of sinus infections, which stubbornly resisted antibiotics. Her doctor told her there was nothing else he could do. "I was desperate," said Schultz, co-owner of a public relations firm in Albuquerque, N.M. "I felt I didn't have any options left."
NEWS
October 25, 1993 | THERESE IKNOIAN, Iknoian is a San Jose-based free-lance health and fitness writer
We hedge our bets with all kinds of insurance policies. We insure our homes, cars, children, husbands, wives, boats, skis and dogs. Heck, dancers even insure their legs. So how about a policy that insures good health? Insurance against cancer, heart disease, cataracts, diabetes, high cholesterol, Parkinson's disease, arthritis and all those ailments that have been accepted as a scourge of aging in today's world. A dream? As of now, yes. But some researchers are on the trail of what they say has the potential to protect us--at least partially--against those diseases.
NEWS
October 6, 1991 | JUDY BERLFEIN, Berlfein is an Encinitas writer.
Sarah Bromley lies on the operating-room table, fading into a state deeper than sleep. Nurses place sheets across her body, leaving an opening over a small section of her lower abdomen. The surgeon, Dr. Joel Batzofin, uses a scalpel to cut a tiny hole in her navel. He inserts a long tube through the incision, pumps Bromley's abdomen full of air and then attaches a video camera eyepiece to the outer end of the tube. A nurse fiddles with a monitor beside Bromley, and, as the screen vividly reflects each move the surgeon makes, suddenly the "Fantastic Voyage" is no longer just Hollywood invention.
BUSINESS
June 4, 1995
"Health Horizons," a special section on the job market for health professionals, appears Monday as Part II of Business. The section takes a look at areas in the health care industry where business is booming.
NEWS
June 5, 1995
"Health Horizons," a special section on the job market for health professionals, appears today as Part II of Business. It looks at areas where business is booming.
NEWS
June 5, 1995 | KATHY SEAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Colin began preschool last fall, his speech was unintelligible. When he wanted to communicate, he'd grab another child's chin and yank at his face, or pull on his clothes and talk in a loud voice, speech and language pathologist Patti Wade recalls. Wade, who works in the Beverly Hills School District, began giving Colin speech therapy. To improve his articulation, she showed him how to bite down gently on his lower lip and blow air out to make the "f" sound.
NEWS
June 5, 1995 | KEVIN BAXTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Laotian couple, unable to understand their doctor's instructions, put oral medicine in their children's ears and wonder why their infections won't heal. A pregnant Latina arrives in a hospital emergency room frightened, alone and deep in the throes of labor. With no Spanish speakers on the staff, hospital workers try to calm the woman by dialing a telephone-company interpreter thousands of miles away.
NEWS
June 5, 1995 | LESLIE KNOWLTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"I felt like an emotional sponge, wrung out, with nothing left but still being squeezed." That's how psychologist Gary Kaplan describes the way he felt back when he was treating patients, before he switched a decade ago to teaching at San Francisco State University. It's called burnout, the debilitating physical and emotional overload that stems from stress on the job.
NEWS
June 5, 1995 | NANCY RIVERA BROOKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emma Quinones is a little girl who choked on a hot dog. That event three years ago left Emma profoundly brain-damaged and changed her family's life forever. Today 5-year-old Emma requires constant care. From 6 a.m. to 10 p.m., she is fed a liquid formula every four hours via a tube to her stomach. At midnight she gets water. Around the clock, her trachea tube must be monitored and suctioned. Emma lives at home, and the burden of all these ministrations falls on her mother, also named Emma.
NEWS
June 5, 1995 | BARRY STAVRO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This spring, Delores, 39, who lives in Tarzana and had been out of work for six years, decided she needed a job, and fast. Her husband was laid off suddenly from his electrician's job, they had a child attending a $6,000-a-year private school, and they had plenty of earthquake repair bills to pay. In one day, she landed a job that pays $45 an hour: as a licensed physical therapist at a nursing home, where she rehabilitates patients with hip fractures and strokes.
NEWS
June 5, 1995 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Baljit Khalsa spent the 1950s in the Bronx, where his mother carted him off to the area's sole health food store, fed him fresh vegetables and gave him megadoses of vitamins before it was fashionable. Perhaps that's one reason why, when given a choice between civil engineering and something a bit less traditional, he chose to become an acupuncturist in Beverly Hills.
NEWS
June 5, 1995 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Barbara Starr, a Brea veterinarian, didn't want the downside of private practice--the debt and paperwork of running a small business. She just wanted to treat people's pets and spend time with her husband and young son. So she went corporate. After working for nine years in small practices owned by others, Starr recently went to work as one of two vets at the Brea branch of VetSmart Pet Hospital and Health Centers, a privately held Portland, Ore.-based chain owned primarily by veterinarians.
NEWS
June 5, 1995 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During a typical day in the pediatric emergency room at Los Angeles County/USC Medical Center, Richard Bradley sets fractured arms, reviews charts and treats children suffering seizures. In between, he teaches and does research. Although his workload sounds like that of a doctor, Bradley, 48, is actually a physician assistant, a 20-year veteran in a field just recently dubbed a "hot" health care career. PAs, as they're known, are No.
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