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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1994 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles judge Friday authorized public-interest lawyers to proceed with a class-action lawsuit aimed at reducing waiting times for low-income patients at county clinics and hospitals. Superior Court Judge Robert H. O'Brien agreed to certify the patients as a class in the lawsuit filed last year against the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and Director of Health Services Robert C. Gates. The suit does not seek financial damages.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY and HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When 8-year-old Evelyn Salcedo needed a tonsillectomy, her mother took her to Michoacan for the operation. The reason? Ana Salcedo had been charged $400 earlier for tests at a hospital in the San Fernando Valley. Without insurance, government assistance or private means, Salcedo could only afford a doctor in Mexico. It was the same for Rosaura Haro. When she and her daughter needed medical tests, she went south.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2000 | PATRICK McGREEVY and HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When 8-year-old Evelyn Salcedo needed a tonsillectomy, her mother took her to Michoacan for the operation. The reason? Ana Salcedo had been charged $400 earlier for tests at a hospital in the San Fernando Valley. Without insurance, government assistance or private means, Salcedo could only afford a doctor in Mexico. It was the same for Rosaura Haro. When she and her daughter needed medical tests, she went south.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1995 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With adoption of a new county budget, the health care delivery system for hundreds of thousands of indigent Los Angeles patients will be in a state of extreme uncertainty for months. Long lines, denial of health care and months of chaotic upheavals is the very least that county officials say can be expected by those who rely on its health centers and hospitals. Beyond that, no one knows for sure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1995 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disaster experts warned Tuesday that closure of County-USC Medical Center would cripple the emergency 911 system, lead to deaths and force the closure of financially struggling hospitals by diverting too many patients their way who could not pay for treatment. "What we would have is a disaster," Alan Cowen, chief of paramedics for the Los Angeles City Fire Department, told the county Health Crisis Task Force.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1991 | CHAUNCEY A. ALEXANDER, Chauncey A. Alexander is the United Way Health Care Task Force chairman in Orange County and a faculty member of the department of social work, at Cal State Long Beach
Committing an additional $7.5 million to the indigent medical care program June 23 was a significant step for the Orange County Board of Supervisors and for those "working poor" residents who are desperately ill. Even more significant, however, is that this Band-Aid on a low-priority health service illustrates the gaping wounds in the entire health care system, the inadequate public policies that guide it and the urgent necessity for basic changes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1995 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With adoption of a new county budget, the health care delivery system for hundreds of thousands of indigent Los Angeles patients will be in a state of extreme uncertainty for months. Long lines, denial of health care and months of chaotic upheavals is the very least that county officials say can be expected by those who rely on its health centers and hospitals. Beyond that, no one knows for sure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1995 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Disaster experts warned Tuesday that closure of County-USC Medical Center would cripple the emergency 911 system, lead to deaths and force the closure of financially struggling hospitals by diverting too many patients their way who could not pay for treatment. "What we would have is a disaster," Alan Cowen, chief of paramedics for the Los Angeles City Fire Department, told the county Health Crisis Task Force.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 1994 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles judge Friday authorized public-interest lawyers to proceed with a class-action lawsuit aimed at reducing waiting times for low-income patients at county clinics and hospitals. Superior Court Judge Robert H. O'Brien agreed to certify the patients as a class in the lawsuit filed last year against the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and Director of Health Services Robert C. Gates. The suit does not seek financial damages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1991 | CHAUNCEY A. ALEXANDER, Chauncey A. Alexander is the United Way Health Care Task Force chairman in Orange County and a faculty member of the department of social work, at Cal State Long Beach
Committing an additional $7.5 million to the indigent medical care program June 23 was a significant step for the Orange County Board of Supervisors and for those "working poor" residents who are desperately ill. Even more significant, however, is that this Band-Aid on a low-priority health service illustrates the gaping wounds in the entire health care system, the inadequate public policies that guide it and the urgent necessity for basic changes.
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