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NEWS
May 4, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Sandra had been diagnosed with manic depression in 1973 at age 19. But, with lithium and psychiatric counseling, she coped well. She even held down a low-paying job. Then, in 1986, she moved to Southern California. Her woes were about to begin. Because her income was meager, she found psychiatric care through a San Fernando-based public clinic that charged her on a sliding-scale fee. However, in 1990, state budget cutbacks left her with just the health insurance provided by her employer.
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BUSINESS
September 8, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Health insurance premiums paid by U.S. companies rose an average of 8.3% this year, the largest increase since 1993, as insurers passed on the rising cost of drugs to employers and sought to boost profits, according to a survey by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and the Health Research and Educational Trust. The survey of 3,402 U.S. businesses found that premiums for health-maintenance organizations rose 8.1% and preferred-provider organization 8.6%.
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NEWS
May 4, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Consumers who see their mental health benefits expanded in the future will also discover that insurers will be intimately involved in the process. In managed care plans, employers and the insurance companies they hire monitor, evaluate and control how benefits are doled out. Experts predict it is only through managed care that some states and private companies are taking timid steps to expand benefits.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Sandra had been diagnosed with manic depression in 1973 at age 19. But, with lithium and psychiatric counseling, she coped well. She even held down a low-paying job. Then, in 1986, she moved to Southern California. Her woes were about to begin. Because her income was meager, she found psychiatric care through a San Fernando-based public clinic that charged her on a sliding-scale fee. However, in 1990, state budget cutbacks left her with just the health insurance provided by her employer.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2000 | Bloomberg News
Health insurance premiums paid by U.S. companies rose an average of 8.3% this year, the largest increase since 1993, as insurers passed on the rising cost of drugs to employers and sought to boost profits, according to a survey by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and the Health Research and Educational Trust. The survey of 3,402 U.S. businesses found that premiums for health-maintenance organizations rose 8.1% and preferred-provider organization 8.6%.
OPINION
April 4, 1993 | John C. Goodman, John C. Goodman is president of the National Center for Policy Analysis and the author, with Gerald L. Musgrave, of "Patient Power: Solving America's Health Care Crisis" (Cato Institute)
In virtually every country with national health insurance, politicians, health ministers and other government officials are searching for ways to reform health-care systems. Increasingly, the reforms being adopted seek to replace socialism in medicine with privatization, competition and market incentives. As other countries struggle to reform their health-care systems, they often look to the United States for guidance. Ironically, many in the United States are urging more government involvement.
NEWS
December 7, 1997 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fever climbs. The calculations begin. How bad is it? How bad will it get? Won't Tylenol do the trick? Or a cool bath, maybe. That always helps. That has to help. Because there's just no money for a doctor right now. It's painful. So shameful. Your daughter is burning up. And there you sit, wondering: Pawn the TV to pay the pediatrician? Or sell the sewing machine? Or maybe you can pay the electric bill late? Such are the calculations of the uninsured. Such is their anguish.
NEWS
May 4, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Consumers who see their mental health benefits expanded in the future will also discover that insurers will be intimately involved in the process. In managed care plans, employers and the insurance companies they hire monitor, evaluate and control how benefits are doled out. Experts predict it is only through managed care that some states and private companies are taking timid steps to expand benefits.
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