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Health Maintainance Organizations

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BUSINESS
November 5, 1991 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After taking millions of patients and investors on a 1980s roller-coaster ride of massive acquisitions and growth that crashed at the end of the decade in one the biggest bankruptcies in Southern California history, Los Angeles-based Maxicare appears to be making a solid comeback as a more modest health maintainance organization.
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BUSINESS
September 17, 1996 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of the state's biggest health maintenance organizations, Foundation Health Corp. and Health Systems International, are in merger talks that would create a managed-care powerhouse with more than 2.5 million members in California alone, according to knowledgeable industry sources.
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BUSINESS
September 17, 1996 | DAVID R. OLMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two of the state's biggest health maintenance organizations, Foundation Health Corp. and Health Systems International, are in merger talks that would create a managed-care powerhouse with more than 2.5 million members in California alone, according to knowledgeable industry sources.
BUSINESS
November 5, 1991 | SUSAN MOFFAT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After taking millions of patients and investors on a 1980s roller-coaster ride of massive acquisitions and growth that crashed at the end of the decade in one the biggest bankruptcies in Southern California history, Los Angeles-based Maxicare appears to be making a solid comeback as a more modest health maintainance organization.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1985 | ROBERT HANLEY, Times Staff Writer
Westworld Community Healthcare Inc. said Tuesday that it will plunge into the rapidly growing field of health maintainance organizations in January when it begins offering prepaid health-care plans in the Crook County, Wyoming, area.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1985 | ROBERT HANLEY and Valencia Bank in Santa Ana and Financial Corp. of America's American Savings & Loan Assn. unit. and Valencia is operating under Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. orders that require it to meet certain financial standards or face a loss of insurance coverage, which would essentially force the bank to close its doors. The bank has been negotiating with a group of six investors to pump $7.5 million into the bank's capital account, but the talks have stalled and the bank has turned to other potential saviors. For the first nine months of 1985, Valencia lost $2.05 million, compared with a loss of $1,000 a year earlier. and American, the nation's largest S&L with $27.6 billion in assets, lost $590.5 million in 1984 and its losses continued in 1985. American posted a loss of $43.7 million for the nine months ended Sept. 30, compared with a loss of $78.4 million a year earlier.
Five years ago, turning a profit in the health-care business was all but assured. Insurance companies generally picked up the tab, and when they didn't, the government did. But in 1985, with the government and private insurance companies imposing strict cost controls, breaking even was barely assured. In Orange County, as throughout the nation, the most successful health-care companies were those that provided specialized and highly focused services.
BUSINESS
February 10, 1985 | PAMELA MORELAND, Times Staff Writer
For Richmond surgeon Ronald Davis, there is nothing more exhilarating than the feeling of completing an intricate operation, striding out of the operating room, snapping off his rubber gloves and informing family members of his latest success. For his precision handiwork, Davis has been well rewarded.
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