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Health Maintenance Organizations

BUSINESS
June 14, 2003 | From Reuters
Some of the largest U.S. health insurers said they would pay for an expensive pacemaker-like device despite Medicare's refusal to cover it for all the patients who might benefit from it. The $25,000 stopwatch-sized device, the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator, can restart a stopped heart or shock a failing heart back into rhythm. Only the sickest one-third of patients who device makers say can benefit from defibrillators won coverage last week from the U.S.
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BUSINESS
April 26, 1990 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bid by Cypress-based PacifiCare Health Systems Inc., to expand in Southern California by acquiring bankrupt Maxicare Health Plans Inc. of Los Angeles ran aground Wednesday after negotiations broke off. In separate statements, both health maintenance organizations confirmed that the talks ended abruptly and that no further discussions are contemplated on PacifiCare's preliminary offer. Neither company would disclose details of the offer, which was made public last Thursday.
NEWS
December 27, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Clinton Administration officials say they will not push Medicare patients to join health maintenance organizations, partly because the government loses money on them, the New York Times reported. Bruce C. Vladeck, head of the agency that runs Medicare, said he would not aggressively promote HMOs until he could guarantee consistent high-quality care and a better way of paying for it, the newspaper reported.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Health-maintenance organizations that withhold poor performance ratings are distorting results of a system that compares the quality of U.S. health-care plans, researchers said. A review found that a quarter to a half of health plans that gave their scores to the National Committee for Quality Assurance in the late 1990s didn't make them public the next year. Those with the worst rankings were as much as five times more likely to withhold results the following year.
BUSINESS
January 24, 1989
The financial solvency of 80 California health maintenance organizations will be examined by Arthur Young & Co. under a contract from the state Department of Corporations. Under the agreement, the audits--required by state law--will be performed over a two-year period. The accounting firm will be paid about $784,000 for the first year.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1998 | Bloomberg News
Chief executives of the nation's largest health maintenance organizations are among the most highly paid CEOs in the country, when their compensation is judged relative to company size and stock performance, a new survey says. The Crystal Report on Executive Compensation established a series of benchmarks for CEO pay after looking at the pay packages of 1,568 CEOs in 31 industries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 2001 | CHARLES ORNSTEIN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
The Davis administration indicated Monday that it wants to gut a bill that would allow independent doctors to bargain collectively with health maintenance organizations. That effectively shuts the door on Assembly-passed legislation that would have exempted doctors from federal antitrust laws. In its place, the California Department of Managed Care is proposing a voluntary process in which individual doctors and HMOs can submit contract disputes to an outside expert.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2003 | From Associated Press
California's health maintenance organizations do a good job caring for heart patients and providing immunization for children but don't do as well serving the needs of the mentally ill, according to a state survey released Tuesday. The annual HMO "Quality of Care Report Card," from the state's Office of the Patient Advocate, ranks the 10 largest health maintenance organizations based on 39,000 customer reports. The survey also includes some of the larger doctor groups in metropolitan areas.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1989 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen Crichton suffered a heart attack just a few weeks after enrolling in a health maintenance organization. Joining an HMO had not been a matter of choice, and she had not counted on testing the quality of care so soon and in such dramatic fashion. But Crichton was pleasantly surprised by the HMO plan she had joined. Not only did she get the top heart specialist at Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach, she said, but her 10-day hospital stay cost her only $15.
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