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NEWS
November 29, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union now have the fastest-rising rates of HIV infection in the world, with the number of HIV-positive people in Russia growing fifteenfold in the last three years, the United Nations reported Wednesday.
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NEWS
November 29, 2001 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union now have the fastest-rising rates of HIV infection in the world, with the number of HIV-positive people in Russia growing fifteenfold in the last three years, the United Nations reported Wednesday.
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NEWS
July 19, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to dispel speculation about his health, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin appeared on television here looking rosy and alert Tuesday, a week after he was hospitalized with acute chest pains. In an interview from the Kremlin hospital where he is reportedly being treated for a constriction of the blood supply to his heart, the 64-year-old Siberian, wearing an Adidas track suit, described his ailment as a "heart seizure." He promised he would be back at work soon. Sergei K.
NEWS
January 16, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As rival politicians demanded that President Boris N. Yeltsin bow out of office for health reasons, the Kremlin medical chief Wednesday offered the most cautious and worrisome assessment yet of the Russian leader's condition. Yeltsin is suffering from double pneumonia, and the ailment is complicated by the quintuple heart bypass surgery he underwent two months ago, presidential physician Sergei P. Mironov told journalists.
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin missed Russian Orthodox Easter services early today, casting some doubt on a new Kremlin medical report that the 64-year-old leader is generally in good health. Russian news agencies said that Yeltsin, who has appeared in public just once this month, was expected to attend midnight services at a Moscow cathedral. But long after the church had overflowed with worshipers and the five-hour service had begun, Yeltsin was not in the VIP section with Prime Minister Viktor S.
NEWS
January 16, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As rival politicians demanded that President Boris N. Yeltsin bow out of office for health reasons, the Kremlin medical chief Wednesday offered the most cautious and worrisome assessment yet of the Russian leader's condition. Yeltsin is suffering from double pneumonia, and the ailment is complicated by the quintuple heart bypass surgery he underwent two months ago, presidential physician Sergei P. Mironov told journalists.
NEWS
March 26, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin launched an ambitious preelection campaign of diplomacy here Monday, rattling his saber against NATO expansion and brushing off worries about rebirth of the Soviet Union. His two-day state visit to Norway, the sole NATO country sharing a border with Russia, is long on ceremony and likely to be the least taxing of trips packing Yeltsin's schedule as he tries to strike a robust pose ahead of the June 16 presidential election.
NEWS
June 7, 2001 | MAURA REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian lawmakers gave resounding approval Wednesday to a plan that would turn sections of Siberia into one of the world's largest nuclear waste dumps--a project that the United States in effect has the power to veto. The Russian government says it can earn an estimated $20 billion over 10 years by importing spent nuclear fuel from power plants in Europe and Asia and that the money can be used to clean up the environment and safeguard nuclear storage sites.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1998 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia has weathered the world's financial crises as well as could be expected and will be allowed to resume borrowing from a $9-billion loan program, the International Monetary Fund's chief decided Thursday. But Managing Director Michel Camdessus warned that much remains unknown about the risks facing this and other emerging markets from the economic turmoil that has rocked Asia for the last few months. "I've come to tell Russia, 'You are doing the right thing, but . . .
BUSINESS
August 12, 1998 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stocks fell sharply again Tuesday worldwide--driving the Dow Jones industrial average to its lowest point in five months--after investors were rattled anew by the deepening economic problems in Asia. But a late rally enabled the U.S. market to avoid an even worse drubbing, and to end the day with much smaller losses than those suffered by many markets in Asia, Europe and Latin America. Some U.S. market watchers suggested that the worst of the recent selling pressure might be abating.
NEWS
March 26, 1996 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin launched an ambitious preelection campaign of diplomacy here Monday, rattling his saber against NATO expansion and brushing off worries about rebirth of the Soviet Union. His two-day state visit to Norway, the sole NATO country sharing a border with Russia, is long on ceremony and likely to be the least taxing of trips packing Yeltsin's schedule as he tries to strike a robust pose ahead of the June 16 presidential election.
NEWS
July 19, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trying to dispel speculation about his health, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin appeared on television here looking rosy and alert Tuesday, a week after he was hospitalized with acute chest pains. In an interview from the Kremlin hospital where he is reportedly being treated for a constriction of the blood supply to his heart, the 64-year-old Siberian, wearing an Adidas track suit, described his ailment as a "heart seizure." He promised he would be back at work soon. Sergei K.
NEWS
April 23, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin missed Russian Orthodox Easter services early today, casting some doubt on a new Kremlin medical report that the 64-year-old leader is generally in good health. Russian news agencies said that Yeltsin, who has appeared in public just once this month, was expected to attend midnight services at a Moscow cathedral. But long after the church had overflowed with worshipers and the five-hour service had begun, Yeltsin was not in the VIP section with Prime Minister Viktor S.
NEWS
January 29, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As far as the Kremlin's openness about the health of Russia's leader is concerned, it can be said that "We're back in the U.S.S.R." It is back to the days when analysts examined television footage for hours to detect if a purported public place was really a hospital room subjected to a little stagecraft. The time is back when official statements are not exactly untruthful but are more telling in what they leave out than for the few words that are carefully chosen.
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