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BUSINESS
July 8, 2007 | Daniel Costello, Times Staff Writer
As he piloted his new, $1.4-million helicopter from his Apple Valley home to Orange County one recent morning, Dr. Prem Reddy enjoyed a cloudless view of his growing empire. Today, the five-seat Eurocopter EC120 whisks him to Anaheim, where he recently agreed to buy two hospitals. On other days, he sweeps over endless miles of gridlock to his facilities in Sherman Oaks, Huntington Beach and San Diego.
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HEALTH
November 14, 2011 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Some smells are strong enough to break through even the stuffiest noses. You can have the cold of the century, but you'll still be able to sense a splash of Pine-Sol or a ball of wasabi. And no matter how clogged up you are, you can pick up the unmistakable scent of menthol. It feels soothing and oddly cool, almost like a nasal injection of Freon. Now that the cold and flu season has arrived, the smell of menthol is wafting through many homes. In a ritual that goes back more than a century, stuffed-up kids and adults are going to sleep with gobs of menthol ointments smeared over their chests.
HEALTH
May 15, 2011 | By Olga Khazan, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Between the sheet-cake birthday parties and hours-long, cookie-fueled management meetings, office work has a way of undermining all our plans to live healthfully. Americans spend nearly nine hours at work each day — and our sedentary jobs wreak havoc on our bodies. Three-quarters of adults get little or no activity daily, according to Dr. James Levine, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Two-thirds of Americans are overweight, and obesity accounts for 63 million physician office visits each year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
A new $16-million building for Saddleback College's health sciences department won unanimous approval this week from trustees of the South Orange County Community College District. The 61,000-square-foot, three-story building also will house college district offices. The board had approved $12.7million for the health sciences building before deciding to add district offices to the structure. Officials said they expect the building to be completed in two years.
SPORTS
January 26, 1990
The Portland Trail Blazers' Ramon Ramos, who suffered severe head injuries in a Dec. 16 automobile crash, is improving, a spokeswoman at Oregon Health Sciences University Hospital said.
HEALTH
March 1, 2010 | Lony Castro, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I never actually intended to harm anyone. Honestly. In fact, I think the waiter is to blame. I was dining at a restaurant with my sister when the waiter casually asked if I was enjoying the evening with my daughter . I tried to shrug off the comment off but couldn't. I decided to get a second opinion and soon found myself walking into the office of a plastic surgeon. I entered through a marbled anteroom centered with a pedestal table and a stunning, if stiff, floral arrangement.
HEALTH
February 14, 2014 | By Chris Woolston
Now that people in Colorado (and, soon, Washington state) can buy marijuana about as easily as they can pick up a 12-pack of Bud Light, it's a good time to ask: How risky is it to turn to pot? President Obama has already shared his opinion, telling the New Yorker magazine, "I don't think [marijuana] is more dangerous than alcohol. " The president's opinion stands in stark contrast with official federal policy that still classifies marijuana as a Schedule 1 drug, putting it in the same class as heroin and LSD. In this case, the president seems to be more correct than the government, says Richard Miller, professor of pharmacology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Matt Pearce, Los Angeles Times
CYPRESS, Texas - A male student who fantasized about stabbing people was charged Tuesday in connection with an attack that injured 14 people, two critically, at a Houston-area community college, authorities said. Dylan Quick, 20, faces three counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon. He is suspected of acting alone in what one official described as a "building-to-building" attack at the Lone Star College-CyFair campus about 30 miles northwest of Houston. "According to the statement the suspect voluntarily gave investigators, he has had fantasies of stabbing people to death since he was in elementary school," the Harris County Sheriff's Office said in a statement late Tuesday.
SCIENCE
June 27, 2006 | Karen Kaplan, Times Staff Writer
Having one or more older brothers boosts the likelihood of a boy growing up to be gay -- an effect due not to social factors, but biological events that occur in their mother's womb, according to a study published today. In an analysis of 905 men and their siblings, Canadian psychologist Anthony Bogaert found no evidence that social interactions among family members played a role in determining whether a man was gay or straight.
NATIONAL
May 29, 2011 | By David Willman, Los Angeles Times
He roamed the University of Cincinnati campus with a loaded gun. When his rage overflowed, the brainy microbiology major would open fire inside empty buildings, visualizing a wall clock or other object as a person who had done him wrong. By the mid-1970s, Bruce Ivins had earned his doctorate and was a promising researcher at the University of North Carolina. By outward appearances, he was a charming eccentric, odd but disarming. Inside, he still smoldered with resentment, and he saw a new outlet for it. Several years earlier, a Cincinnati student had turned him down for a date.
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