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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1992 | KENNETH J. GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The signs for Robert Martinez were not good when he arrived at the hospital four months ago. They rarely are when a body is stripped almost completely of the familiar insulating layer called skin. With more than 80% of his body burned in a refinery steam explosion and his lungs horribly damaged by contaminants from the blast, Martinez could breathe only with the aid of a ventilator as he lay comatose in his specially equipped bed at Torrance Memorial Medical Center.
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SCIENCE
January 28, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
A crushing medical bill can cause money problems not just for a cash-strapped patient but for his or her entire family. New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show more than one in four U.S. families recently experienced a financial burden due to the cost of medical care. Among Americans who participated in the National Health Interview Survey in 2012, 8.9% said they were currently having problems paying a medical bill and another 7.6% said they had been in that situation sometime in the previous 12 months.
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NEWS
January 16, 1993 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Just as this week's two apparently harmless fires at the Chernobyl nuclear plant rekindled popular fears in Ukraine, Turkey has been reliving its own nightmare of those fearful days of radioactive clouds and rain. But whereas Ukrainians have lived for years with the impact of the April, 1986, disaster--8,000 people are thought to have died as a result--the Turks 700 miles to the south had always been told that they had little to worry about.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Which Americans are least likely to be overweight or obese? Asian Americans, by a long shot. New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal that 38.6% of Asian American adults have a body mass index over 25, the threshold for being considered overweight. That's far below the 66.7% rate among whites, 76.7% rate among blacks and 78.8% rate among Latinos. Some Asian American adults are more likely to be overweight than others. For instance, 43% of men have a BMI over 25, compared with 34.7% of women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Defying enduring stereotypes about black fatherhood, a federal survey of American parents shows that by most measures, black fathers who live with their children are just as involved as other dads who live with their kids - or more so. For instance, among fathers who lived with young children, 70% of black dads said they bathed, diapered or dressed those kids every day, compared with 60% of white fathers and 45% of Latino fathers, according to...
NEWS
April 26, 1991 | Associated Press
Japan's women live longest, Hungarians have the highest suicide rate and more people living in industrialized nations die from smoking than from any form of violence, a new survey by the World Health Organization says. The figures are among thousands packed into WHO's 423-page statistical yearbook, which includes a comprehensive mortality survey based on reports from 55 countries, mostly in the Americas and Europe. The new edition, released this month, covers data through 1989.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Banking away from the freeways toward the seashore, Laguna Canyon Road fairly sings of the beauty, escape and fun ahead. It skims past a shallow lagoon, then sweeps by towering eucalyptus trees and cattle grazing on hillsides. The road spills out onto Coast Highway and Main Beach, where on a warm fall day the carefree and the bronzed play volleyball and bask in the sunshine.
SCIENCE
January 28, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
A crushing medical bill can cause money problems not just for a cash-strapped patient but for his or her entire family. New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show more than one in four U.S. families recently experienced a financial burden due to the cost of medical care. Among Americans who participated in the National Health Interview Survey in 2012, 8.9% said they were currently having problems paying a medical bill and another 7.6% said they had been in that situation sometime in the previous 12 months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 1999 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County residents are healthier than Californians as a whole and had lower rates of teen pregnancy and AIDS cases, according to a state health study released Tuesday. In a study that measures various indicators of health in a number of categories, including causes of death, Orange County did better than the statewide average in all areas except the rate of low-birth-weight infants.
SCIENCE
January 15, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Which Americans are least likely to be overweight or obese? Asian Americans, by a long shot. New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveal that 38.6% of Asian American adults have a body mass index over 25, the threshold for being considered overweight. That's far below the 66.7% rate among whites, 76.7% rate among blacks and 78.8% rate among Latinos. Some Asian American adults are more likely to be overweight than others. For instance, 43% of men have a BMI over 25, compared with 34.7% of women.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Defying enduring stereotypes about black fatherhood, a federal survey of American parents shows that by most measures, black fathers who live with their children are just as involved as other dads who live with their kids - or more so. For instance, among fathers who lived with young children, 70% of black dads said they bathed, diapered or dressed those kids every day, compared with 60% of white fathers and 45% of Latino fathers, according to...
NEWS
November 26, 2013 | By Jamie Wetherbe
When should a women have her first baby? A majority of Americans said age 25 or younger would be the ideal, according to a new survey.   Gallup recently polled 5,100 people and found that 58% said women should start having children in their early 20s or late teens.   Only 3% of respondents said 31 or older is the ideal time for a woman to have her first child.   In this teetering economy -- and with the unemployment rate for 20- to 24-year-olds hovering around 13% -- the survey sparks the question: Exactly who thinks 25 is "ideal"?
SCIENCE
August 29, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
About one in 25 American adults takes sleeping pills to help them fall asleep and stay asleep at night, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Researchers from the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics examined surveys of adults ages 20 and older who were asked whether they had taken a prescription sleep aid in the previous 30 days. The experts found some distinct patterns among sleeping pill users: -- Women were more likely to use sleeping pills than men (5% of women used them, along with 3.1% of men)
SCIENCE
June 6, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Talk about consistency: An estimated 3,958,000 babies were born in the U.S. in 2012, a mere 4,407 more than in 2011. That amounts to a difference of only slightly more than 0.1%. The figures were released Thursday by the National Center for Health Statistics, part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Brady Hamilton and Paul Sutton noted that births in the U.S. had been on a steady decline since 2007, when a record-high 4,316,233 new Americans came into the world.
NEWS
January 11, 2013 | By Jon Healey
It would be silly to try to reduce the American character -- if there even is such a thing -- to a single graph. But the one pictured above, taken from a report released Wednesday by the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine, does a pretty good job conveying the truth behind one of the developed world's favorite stereotypes of the United States. We are, indeed, far more prone to lethal violence than any other country in the developed world. Why? The report wasn't designed to answer that particular question.
SCIENCE
June 5, 2012 | By Rosie Mestel, Los Angeles Times
The gap in life expectancy between black and white Americans is smaller than it has ever been, thanks largely to a decline in the number of deaths resulting from heart disease and HIV infection, a new analysis has found. That's the good news. The bad news is that the gap is still large: A black baby boy born today can expect to live 5.4 fewer years, on average, than his white counterpart, and a black baby girl will die 3.7 years earlier, on average, than her white counterpart. What's more, the narrowing of the gap between 2003 and 2008 is due in part to a troubling development among whites: They are more likely than in the past to die from overdoses of powerful prescription medications like OxyContin and Vicodin, along with other unintentional poisonings.
NEWS
April 21, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cancer deaths and the rate of new cases are continuing their encouraging downward trend--in part the result of American adults quitting smoking--but federal health officials on Tuesday warned that lung cancer rates are likely to jump again unless smoking among adolescents is curbed.
NEWS
May 23, 1999 | TRACY WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Medications banned or highly restricted in the United States because of severe, and sometimes fatal, side effects are being smuggled in from Mexico and peddled out of back-room shops across Southern California. These potentially dangerous drugs, which multinational pharmaceutical companies market in Mexico, where regulations and enforcement are less stringent, have shown up consistently in more than 70 raids over the last year of markets, dress shops and swap meets catering to Latino immigrants.
NEWS
January 26, 2012 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Home birth is making a marked resurgence in the United States, according to data released Thursday by the federal government. A century ago, most births took place at home. But the rate fell steadily and slipped to less than 1% of all births by 1969 and just over 0.5% in 2004. Though still not common, home births have risen 29% from 2004 to 2009, according to the statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2009, the most recent year for which data are available, 0.72% of all births took place at home.
HEALTH
March 18, 2011
An estimated 62 million U.S. women are in their childbearing years. Of those, 62% use some kind of contraception. Among those who don't, 31% are pregnant, trying to get pregnant, postpartum, sterile or not sexually active. The other 7% take their chances. Among those using contraceptives, here's what they use: The pill 28% Sterilization 27.1% Condom 16.1% Vasectomy 9.9% IUD 5.5% Withdrawal 5.2% Injectable Depo-Provera 3.2% Vaginal ring 2.4 Rhythm 0.9 Other: 0.6 Statistics from the National Center for Health Statistics and the Guttmacher Institute.
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