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Health Workers

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2008 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
During a typical 12-hour shift, Hector Hernandez can be found in just about any corner of Kaiser Sunset, tending to premature infants and the elderly, to patients with asthma and those with AIDS, to heart attack victims and survivors of car wrecks. He connects patients to ventilators, evaluates lung capacity and blood gases and administers oxygen and aerosol medications. Clad in green scrubs and white running shoes, he is often the first to arrive on a "code blue" -- the term that is broadcast when a patient has stopped breathing.
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NEWS
July 9, 1992 | IRENE WIELAWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state's budget deadlock, which may mean deep cuts to health and welfare programs, has hospital administrators and health care workers in a state of near panic while they try to go about business as usual and handle frightened patients' questions about the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2002 | ANDREA PERERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ferdinand Rojo, 36, was once chief resident of anesthesiology at a hospital in the Philippines. Since immigrating to the United States in 1990, however, he has been able to work only as an electrocardiogram technician. Fighting tears, Rojo explained to a gathering of academics and health workers this week his struggle to become a doctor in this country. In 1999, he applied for 150 medical residency programs. Last year, defeated by a torrent of rejection letters, he sent out only 20 applications.
NATIONAL
June 25, 2003 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
The large-scale smallpox vaccinations of U.S. military personnel were conducted so safely that President Bush's civilian vaccination effort should be able to proceed at a much faster rate than it has so far, a study published Tuesday found. But representatives of some of the front-line health-care workers who are eligible for the government's voluntary vaccination program remained skeptical about participating. Charles Idelson, spokesman for the 50,000-member California Nurses Assn.
NEWS
September 16, 1995 | JEFFREY L. RAIN and JOSH MEYER and MAX VANZI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The real agony created by Los Angeles County's worst-ever fiscal crisis made itself felt Friday as nearly 5,200 county health workers--from doctors and nurses to lab technicians and custodians--were handed terse notices saying they will lose their jobs or be demoted within two weeks unless financial salvation arrives from Sacramento and Washington.
NEWS
October 14, 1995 | HENRY CHU and JON D. MARKMAN and JEFF BRAZIL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For a weeping Doris Hish at Olive View/UCLA Medical Center in Sylmar, the morning was devoted to firing 35 people--with a dozen more to go in the afternoon. At County-USC Medical Center, Marsha Murray's best friend and fellow nurse was gone by day's end. And in Van Nuys, denial and devotion came together in Ana Banos, a nursing attendant who refused to consider the idea of losing her job one moment, then prayed to be spared the next.
HEALTH
September 29, 2003 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Even health professionals who specialize in treating and studying obesity aren't immune to anti-fat bias. Like many Americans, they too tend to view excess pounds as a character failing -- even if only unconsciously, researchers have reported. Doctors, nurses, pharmacologists, dietitians and lab scientists have all been taught that obesity is rooted not just in personal habits but in a mix of genetics and environmental influences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 22, 1995 | CARLA RIVERA and TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors voted unanimously Tuesday to dismiss more than 300 health employees, a move that will save the cash-strapped county about $3.6 million this fiscal year but has sparked concern about the impact on health services. In all, about 300 employees will get pink slips, while about 100 more contract and temporary positions are scheduled to be eliminated. The layoffs are due to take effect on April 15.
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