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NATIONAL
July 1, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
As of today, nearly everyone in Massachusetts must have health insurance or face a series of increasing tax penalties. The law won't result in universal coverage immediately, but the deadline is a critical mile marker. "July 1 is really a call to action," said Leslie Kirwan, chairwoman of the Health Care Connector Authority board, which oversees implementation of the law. "We are looking to insure people, not penalize them."
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 6, 2014 | By Lisa Zamosky
Now that open enrollment under the Affordable Care Act is over for this year, healthcare consumers can begin to put their insurance policies to work. For many, it may be a challenge. A year ago, Norm Wilkinson, 61, retired after 35 years as a Teamster and signed on to a retiree health plan. He figured he'd enjoy the same comprehensive coverage he'd had for years, but soon learned that prescription drugs weren't covered. "I did not get a prescription drug plan with it, and that was the big killer," said Wilkinson, a resident of Whittier.
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NATIONAL
May 10, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
As many as 25,000 state residents who have no health insurance will be able to get it under a reform package agreed to in Montpelier by Gov. Jim Douglas and legislative leaders. The bill would extend healthcare coverage to as much as 96% of the state's population by 2010. The bill calls for the creation of a new insurance plan that would be sold by private companies but subsidized by the state for those who cannot afford it.
NEWS
April 3, 2014 | By Seema Mehta
Once again, Bill Clinton proved that being an ex-president, surrounded by the rosy glow of the past, beats being the current pilloried resident of the White House. A Wednesday night guest on comedian Jimmy Kimmel's late-night ABC show, Clinton was tight-lipped about his family's future political plans, leaving that to Hillary Rodham Clinton to eventually divulge, but embraced his 1992 moniker as the nation's “first black president” - and the actual first black president. “I loved being called the first black president, but Barack Obama really is,” Clinton told Kimmel, to laughs.
NATIONAL
April 26, 2010 | By Ann M. Simmons, Los Angeles Times
On the same day that Daniel Rona qualified for healthcare coverage through his job as an emergency medical technician, an SUV slammed Rona's motorcycle as he was riding in Santa Monica. He was propelled more than 20 feet and landed on his head, breaking his cervical spine and injuring the frontal lobe of his brain. The accident occurred on Jan. 18, 2009, three months after Rona had started working for Gerber Ambulance Service. The date also marked the end of the waiting period for him to qualify for employee healthcare insurance, but Rona — then 21 — had not yet signed the paperwork to start the coverage.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2011 | David Lazarus
Conservatives tend to become apoplectic at the thought of the government requiring people to pay for health insurance or any form of public program designed to provide universal coverage. Yet most of those same conservatives — including Republican lawmakers — are perfectly at ease with the idea of requiring that all phone users pay a fee intended to provide universal coverage for telecom services. This disparity (or hypocrisy) was on full display as the one Republican member of the Federal Communications Commission joined his three Democratic colleagues recently in voting to overhaul a decades-old system of providing subsidies for phone service in rural areas.
NEWS
October 31, 2004
Summary: Proposition 72 would require businesses with 50 or more employees to provide health insurance or pay a fee into a state-run plan for those workers. This is a referendum on a law, Senate Bill 2, approved in 2003. If Proposition 72 is approved, employers with 200 or more workers would have to provide health coverage for employees and their dependents starting in January 2006.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2009 | Patrick McGreevy and Evan Halper
A state board voted today to begin terminating healthcare coverage for tens of thousands of low-income children on Oct. 1, the result of budget cuts recently signed into law by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. More than 60,000 children, up for annual reevaluation of their coverage next month, would be dropped from the Healthy Families program in October under the action by the state Managed Risk Medical Insurance Board. The board is scrambling to secure funding from other sources, including the Legislature and money set aside by voters for early childhood education.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2007 | Kathy M. Kristof, Times Staff Writer
When Scott Fowler quit his job at Wal-Mart to make a living as a painting contractor, he left his medical insurance behind. He and his wife went without health coverage for years because the West Covina resident believed he couldn't afford premiums of $600 to $700 a month. But in recent years the health insurance industry, once seemingly indifferent to individual customers, has increasingly catered to them, said Gary Lauer, chief executive of EHealth Inc. in Mountain View, Calif.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2013 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
Ana Soltero arrived at La Placita Church on Sunday holding an envelope filled with documents and hoping for one thing: to get health coverage. She and her 20-year-old son, Alan Servin, had been receiving Medi-Cal but were mistakenly cut off last year. Now she was uninsured, feeling ill and wanting to see a doctor. "I came to see if you can help me with insurance," she told a volunteer. Soltero was among dozens of uninsured Los Angeles County residents who went to the downtown L.A. church to get enrolled in public health insurance programs and find out where to seek care.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2014 | By Michael Hiltzik
Against all odds and expectations, enrollments in health plans qualified under the Affordable Care Act are surging Monday toward -- and maybe beyond -- the 7-million figure projected by the Congressional Budget Office before Oct. 1, when the open-enrollment period began. The deadline for starting enrollment applications for 2014 plans is midnight Monday. The surge is creating a big problem for the "train wreck" narrative of Republican opponents of the ACA, who have been holding out hope for Obamacare's utter failure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
One long period of Obamacare hand-wringing in Los Angeles County will end Monday, as the window for residents to enroll in mandatory healthcare coverage comes to a close. But less than 24 hours later, county elected officials will be confronted with another politically sensitive facet of the nation's healthcare overhaul: how to manage roughly a million people, many of them poor or undocumented, who will remain uninsured either because they aren't eligible or failed to enroll. Unlike some other counties in California, which are sidestepping the issue and leaving the problem largely to nonprofit free clinics, Los Angeles has committed to providing residents without coverage some system of government-supported medical care.
NEWS
March 27, 2014 | By Doyle McManus
When Jorge Mario Bergoglio became Pope Francis a little more than a year ago, the first thing that struck those who knew him well was his unexpected, beatific smile. “In Argentina, he didn't smile like that,” Sergio Rubin, the pope's biographer, said this week at a conference sponsored by the Ethics and Public Policy Center. “That was the big surprise.” Since then, the pope has mostly kept on smiling - in homilies, in audiences, in meetings with the homeless and the poor.
NEWS
March 5, 2014 | By Noam Levey
WASHINGTON -- The Obama administration announced Wednesday that some Americans with health insurance policies that don't meet consumer standards set by the Affordable Care Act will be allowed to keep their plans into 2017, three years later than originally envisioned. Allowing some consumers to keep old insurance plans past the end of the President Obama's term in office marks the latest effort by the administration to get out from under one of the most damaging controversies shadowing the launch of the healthcare law. Senior administration officials, briefing reporters on condition of anonymity, said they believe that about 1.5 million consumers nationwide currently are covered under such plans, about 500,000 of which were purchased by individuals and the rest by small businesses.
NATIONAL
January 30, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - Rep. Henry A. Waxman, one of the nation's most influential liberal lawmakers for nearly four decades, will retire from his Westside seat this year, closing a career in which he successfully championed laws to clean the country's air, regulate cigarettes and steadily expand healthcare coverage for the poor. His retirement, which set off a political scramble among potential replacements, was the latest of a series of departures that are remaking the state's long-stable congressional delegation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- The head of the California Legislative Latino Caucus proposed Friday that immigrants in the country illegally be allowed to get healthcare coverage through a state program similar to that provided through Obamacare. State Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) said that if the goal is to provide healthcare coverage to all uninsured, then immigration status should not be a factor in the decision. “We've made enormous strides to reduce California's uninsured population with the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, but we won't have a truly healthy state until everyone has access to quality, affordable coverage,” said Lara.
HEALTH
February 27, 2012 | By Bob Rosenblatt, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Workers swarmed through Henry J. Kaiser's Richmond, Calif., shipyard in World War II, building 747 ships for the Navy. The war "had siphoned off the most hardy specimens," a newspaper reported, so Kaiser was left with many workers too young, old or infirm to be drafted. The workers needed to be in good health to be effective on the job, and Kaiser offered them care from doctors in company clinics and at company hospitals. The workers paid 50 cents a week for the benefit. It was something new in industrial America - a bonus offered to attract scarce labor while wages were frozen during the war. The war ended, the workers quit the shipyards, leaving behind hospitals and doctors but no patients.
NATIONAL
December 29, 2013 | By Noam N. Levey and Chad Terhune
WASHINGTON - Nearly four years after it was signed and after months of scrambling and uncertainty, President Obama's landmark bid to guarantee Americans health security takes full effect Wednesday as the Affordable Care Act begins delivering healthcare coverage to millions nationwide. Administration officials reported Sunday that about 1.1 million people had enrolled in health plans using the federal website, HealthCare.gov, the main entry point for coverage in 36 states. Nearly all the enrollments came in the last couple of weeks as the deadline approached for coverage that would take effect Jan. 1. Several hundred thousand people have enrolled on separate sites run by 14 states and the District of Columbia, with the largest figure coming from California, where more than 400,000 have signed up. An exact count nationwide is not yet available because not all states have tallied their figures, but the total appears to be about 2 million.
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