Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHealthcare Legislation
IN THE NEWS

Healthcare Legislation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
August 10, 2009 | Noam N. Levey
With lawmakers home for their August recess, a fierce battle has broken out over what precisely is in the mammoth healthcare bills being pushed by congressional Democrats. There has been no shortage of misinformation, much of it advanced by critics of President Obama's overhaul effort who have made sometimes outlandish claims. Here is a look at a few of the most contentious points. Does the legislation include provisions to encourage senior citizens to commit suicide? No. This has become one of the most misleading, inflammatory claims made in the healthcare debate, advanced repeatedly by conservative commentators such as Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity and Republican lawmakers working to stoke fears among seniors.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
December 4, 2013 | Doyle McManus
President Obama's speech Tuesday announced the relaunch of his healthcare program's website. But he was also aiming to relaunch his entire second term, which has careened from high ambition to near-catastrophe in less than 11 months. Until his signature healthcare program is running smoothly, Obama stands little chance of focusing Congress on any of the other goals of his once-ambitious second-term agenda, including immigration reform and addressing the nation's infrastructure needs.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
February 18, 2010 | By Noam N. Levey
President Obama, after sustaining months of criticism for not being clear about what he wanted in healthcare legislation, will post specific proposals for a comprehensive plan on the Internet by Monday, according to the White House. The posting would come three days before a televised meeting that Obama plans to convene with congressional Democratic and Republican leaders in hopes of restarting his stalled bid to overhaul the nation's healthcare system. "There will be one proposal.
BUSINESS
October 29, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons
WASHINGTON - As the pitchman for his landmark healthcare law, President Obama promised to make buying insurance as easy as buying a plane ticket online or a "TV on Amazon. " It would be simple, he said. If there were problems, the president predicted, they would be "glitches. " And he said, "If you like the plan you have, you can keep it. " Such claims have come back to haunt the president and his allies less than a month into the launch of the online insurance marketplaces at the heart of his healthcare legislation.
OPINION
January 20, 2010 | By Orrin G. Hatch and Mark Shurtleff
The House and Senate have passed their respective versions of the legislation to take over the healthcare system, and a common bill is being hammered out, once again behind closed doors. The essential elements that we know will be in the final product are bad policy for America and, perhaps worse, a threat to liberty itself. The courts may have to enforce the constitutional boundaries that Congress has ignored. This legislation presents at least two categories of constitutional problems.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2010 | By Nicole Santa Cruz
So what's with all the pens? Why did President Obama use 22 pens to sign the healthcare legislation Tuesday? He was continuing a long-standing White House tradition for approving important legislation. The pens are "a way of giving a very meaningful memento to the people who played a significant role in passing the legislation," said Mark Peterson, a professor of public policy and political science at UCLA. Obama kept a pen for himself after signing the bill, and 19 pens were given out as mementos.
NATIONAL
January 25, 2010 | By Jim Puzzanghera
The Obama administration tried Sunday to steady itself and its top domestic priority after last week's stunning Massachusetts Senate upset, as a top White House official vowed to move ahead with comprehensive healthcare legislation because "the underlying elements of it are popular and important." "The president will not walk away from the American people, will not hand them over to the tender mercies of health insurance companies who take advantage" of them, White House senior advisor David Axelrod said on ABC's "This Week."
NATIONAL
April 25, 2009 | Noam N. Levey
Senior Democrats have reached broad agreement on a plan to prevent Republicans from blocking President Obama's sweeping healthcare proposals, congressional officials said Friday. The plan, which would use special provisions of the budget process to prevent a Senate filibuster, threatens to sow outrage among Republican lawmakers and could complicate Democrats' efforts to push through the rest of their agenda.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2009 | By Noam N. Levey and Janet Hook
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, unveiling the House's plan for a compromise on healthcare legislation today, said the bill would offer new insurance for tens of millions of Americans and lower costs for those who already have coverage. The plan represents a compromise among various interests in the House, the speaker said. It also will lead to a planned House vote and position House leaders for negotiations with Senate leaders crafting their own plan. "Here we are, for nearly a century -- it's really over a century -- leaders of all political parties . . . have called and fought for healthcare and health insurance reform," said Pelosi (D- San Francisco)
NATIONAL
March 28, 2010 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Ashley Powers
Gathered amid the dust and sagebrush of the Nevada desert, thousands of conservative "tea party" protesters responded Saturday to their critics with what might be called the young protest movement's unofficial motto. Don't tread on me. Dozens of yellow flags bearing that defiant message, along with the image of a coiled snake poised to strike, whipped in the wind above the crowds rallying in the tiny highway hometown of Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. Along with repeating familiar tea party themes -- government is too big, the healthcare overhaul is socialist -- the protesters pointedly answered critics who say the group's rhetoric has fueled violence and threats against Democratic lawmakers in an increasingly poisonous political climate after the passage of healthcare legislation.
NEWS
August 7, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
Who can forget the time last year when Gov. Jan Brewer greeted President Obama on the tarmac in Mesa, Ariz., and famously wagged her finger at him as the two discussed their differences over immigration. The two met up again Tuesday, in a tarmac sequel that produced far more smiles and far less finger-pointing. Clearly, a great deal has changed since that first January 2012 exchange. For starters, the Obama administration successfully challenged the state's SB 1070 law that essentially sought to drive immigrants out of the state.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Get ready to pay more for your Papa John's pizza if "Obamacare" goes into full effect … a whopping 15 to 20 cents more. John Schnatter, chief executive of the pizza chain, is bashing President Obama's healthcare reform law as a policy that will force the company to choose between its customers and its investors. And if the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act rolls out as planned in 2014, Schnatter's strategy is “of course … to pass that cost on the consumer in order to protect our shareholders' best interest,” he said in a recent conference call.
NEWS
July 9, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- To understand the choices before voters this fall, look to Congress this week, where the House and Senate are set to conduct show votes on measures that will have long lives on the campaign trail, but little expectation of becoming law. The contrast being presented is clear: The GOP-led House is scheduled to vote on a bill to repeal President Obama's healthcare law; the Senate, with its Democratic majority, will try to advance one...
NEWS
June 25, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- As Congress awaits the Supreme Court ruling on President Obama's healthcare legislation, House Speaker John A. Boehner had a stern warning for rank-and-file Republicans he has struggled to keep on message. “There will be no spiking of the ball,” Boehner wrote in a memo to GOP lawmakers. Even though Republicans have opposed the law, and tried to repeal it, there will be no celebrations if the court strikes down the law or parts of it. Republicans have worked to keep their troops focused on what GOP leaders see is their best talking point heading toward the November election: jobs and the economy . “Republicans are focused on the economy,” Boehner went on in the memo circulated late last week.
NEWS
March 28, 2012 | By Morgan Little
As reported earlier today by the Times , the Supreme Court continued its deliberations on President Obama's sweeping healthcare reforms, focusing on whether striking the entire law down would be feasible, and what the fallout would be were the court to take such a drastic action. Similar to Tuesday's proceedings, the Justices didn't fail to keep the pressure on both sides of the debate, keeping the heat on both Edwin Kneedler, deputy solicitor general, and Paul Clement, arguing against the law. Follow below for some of the standout clips from the Supreme Court as it continues to weigh the pressures of deciding the future of healthcare.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2011 | By Noam N. Levey and Lisa Mascaro, Washington Bureau
Following up on their largely symbolic vote to repeal the new healthcare law, House Republicans moved ahead Thursday with more targeted efforts to advance their own healthcare initiatives, including deregulating health insurance sales. More than 60 House Republicans signed on to a new bill to permit interstate sales of health insurance. The goal would be to lower premium costs by avoiding requirements in many states that insurers cover certain services, such as maternity care, cancer screenings and mastectomies.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2009 | Associated Press
Maneuvering to improve prospects for sweeping healthcare legislation, Senate Democrats hope first to win quick approval for a bill that grants doctors a $247-billion increase in Medicare fees over a decade but raises federal deficits in the process, officials said Wednesday. By creating a two-bill approach, Democrats can contend that the more comprehensive healthcare measure meets President Obama's conditions -- that it will neither add to deficits nor exceed $900 billion in costs over 10 years.
NATIONAL
March 24, 2010 | By Kathleen Hennessey
Leaders of the movement that bloomed in opposition to the healthcare bill say activists are only further galvanized in defeat and now closer to the Republican Party they once claimed to scorn. But "tea party" activists have not made it easy for mainstream Republicans to return the embrace. The bill's final push to passage Sunday brought reports that protesters on Capitol Hill had directed a racial epithet at a black Democrat and twice shouted a derogatory term at a gay lawmaker.
NEWS
November 17, 2010 | By Noam N. Levey, Tribune Washington Bureau
Previewing the partisan healthcare battle to come next year, the Obama administration's new head of Medicare and Medicaid went to the Capitol on Wednesday to defend the new healthcare law against irritated Republican lawmakers for the first time. Dr. Donald Berwick, whom Obama appointed in July without Senate confirmation to help lead implementation of the new healthcare law, told lawmakers that repealing the law would be a major a mistake. "I can't think of a worse plan," Berwick, a pediatrician and leading advocate for improving healthcare quality, told the Senate Finance Committee.
NEWS
November 3, 2010 | By James Oliphant, Tribune Washington Bureau
With election returns streaming in Tuesday night and Republicans within reach of retaking the majority in the U.S. House of Representatives, the question will soon turn to what they intend to do with the political might they've feverishly worked to regain. The GOP needed to gain 39 seats to take over the House for the first time since 2006 ? and early results from races in pivotal districts in Indiana, Virginia and Florida suggested the party would achieve and probably surpass that goal, though it was too early to declare a history-making rout.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|