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September 17, 2009 | Associated Press
Paula Creamer is sick of being sick, so it would make her feel pretty good if she can defend her title in the Samsung World Championship starting today at Torrey Pines. Creamer battled a mystery illness most of the year and is still looking for her first win of 2009. She said her energy levels are returning to normal and she's getting her distance back. Still, she's a little bit wary. She got sick after going to Mexico in November for the Lorena Ochoa Invitational. Doctors did test after test and she was on medication.
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SPORTS
April 6, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan
Kent Bazemore cried a little bit. Nick Young planted his face in a towel for a long time. Sunday was rough on them, the latest two injured Lakers. In another sign of a bad season, the Lakers have more hurt players (eight) than healthy ones (seven). Bazemore crumpled to the court and rolled around after sustaining a sprained right foot in the second quarter against the Clippers. The weird part was how it happened: Bazemore was merely dribbling near the three-point line, trying to keep the ball away from Darren Collison , when he felt a pop. He was helped off the court and scheduled for an MRI exam Monday.
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HEALTH
November 23, 1998
Rarely do I venture into the Health section, but on Oct. 26 something caught my eye: "Fatherhood and the Brief Matter of Boxers." The first thing I noticed when I found the article was that the author (Kristl Buluran) is a woman. I firmly believe that in relation to fertility, the debate between boxers and briefs is a man's subject--and should be discussed for and by men. The bottom line: The Healthy Man column should be written by a man (healthy or not). That's not to say that I don't appreciate a woman's input on which she prefers, because I do; that is why after reading Kristl's opinion that "boxers just look better" and are sexier, I went out and burned my only pair.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch and David Undercoffler
Despite General Motors' recent recall of millions of its cars - and several investigations into the issue - buyers are still streaming into GM dealerships. The beleaguered automaker announced Tuesday that sales in March rose 4% compared with the same month a year earlier. Nearly the entire industry saw a similar jump in the U.S., with sales up 5.7% to 1.54 million vehicles, according to Autodata. Pent-up consumer demand and healthy sales incentives helped companies rebound from a slow February, when bad weather throughout much of the country kept buyers away, according to Mark Wakefield, managing director at AlixPartners and head of its automotive practice in North America.
NEWS
May 20, 1999
If you work with nature, you can enjoy beautiful roses without all the extra work, cost and hazard of routine chemical use ("Six Ways to Keep Those Blooms on the Rose," April 8). Here is a list of five important tips that Tommy Cairns failed to include: 1. Proper Placement in the Garden: Roses must have at least six hours of direct sun daily, and they need good air circulation as well. Sun and air prevent fungi. 2. The Power of Mulch: Adding compost as a top dressing on a regular basis is vital to maintaining healthy soil and therefore healthy plants.
NEWS
October 10, 2008 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, Ronald Brownstein is a senior writer at the National Journal.
This week's most important debate wasn't the meandering town hall duel between Barack Obama and John McCain. That encounter was understandably scored by polls and most pundits as a win for Obama, who seemed steadier than an over-caffeinated McCain. But lackluster questions and a constrictive format meant it did little to clarify the decision facing voters. Far more instructive was the argument Obama instigated with McCain last week over healthcare. In speeches, Obama accurately framed the central contrast between the nominees' approaches.
NEWS
October 30, 1994
As president-for-life of Softbodies of America--whose membership consists of everyone who agrees with me, whether they've heard of me or not--I must respond to "How Best to Tackle Weight Problem?" (Oct. 18). The panel of 18 experts got it all wrong. Again. As our millions of members (rough estimate) could tell you, setting standards for "healthy" or "desirable" weights is enough to send a person running for Betty Crocker lemon bars. Most people older than 35 cannot achieve those weights without starving themselves and working out to the point of exhaustion or resorting to liposuction.
HEALTH
October 8, 2001
I was delighted to see the article on exercise for the aging and disabled ("An Exercise in Frustration," Sept. 10). However, my delight soon went crashing when you immediately shifted the subject, almost exclusively, to exercise for the disabled. As a healthy aging person myself, I am struggling with the need for exercise and the inappropriateness of most classes for my age group. I have thought for some time that gyms and other programs are missing a good bet. There are many people like me who have enjoyed vigorous exercise all our lives, who would welcome classes geared for those of us who can no longer do push-ups because of arthritic hands or move quickly because of failing knees, but who want to keep our muscles strong and bodies flexible.
NEWS
April 7, 1993
I was shocked by Mary Rourke's commentary on I. Magnin in the March 5 View ("The Decline and Fall of High Society Shopping)." The gist of it seemed to be: Magnin's is old-fashioned and dying; anyone modern shops at Neiman, Saks or Shauna Stein. May I ask how Rourke would feel reading her article if she were an employee of a healthy Magnin's like the much-expanded Beverly Hills store? Might she feel, as I do, that someone was knocking her livelihood for no good purpose? I am not a disinterested party, being a sales rep who deals with the store, a customer and a Californian who'd like to see the last great California better store survive.
NEWS
May 10, 1992
Re: "The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles": My compliments to ABC and George Lucas for promoting internationalism, independent thinking and healthy curiosity. Sonia Cauci, Norwalk
SPORTS
March 14, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. -- The benefits of a healthy Albert Pujols shouldn't just be felt at the plate this season. Pujols, relegated to designated hitter for 65 of 99 games in an injury-shortened 2013 season, has started nine of 10 games at first base this spring and has already flashed some of the range, hands, reactions and skills that earned him National League Gold Glove Awards with St. Louis in 2006 and 2010. “I'm really excited and happy with how I'm playing at first base and how I'm moving,” Pujols said.
SPORTS
March 12, 2014 | By Steve Dilbeck
You want sharp, buy a Henckels. Try and match wits with P.J. O'Rourke. Read Jim Murray. Right now the Dodgers just need Zack Greinke to build some arm strength, and all that sharpness can come later. Greinke threw only four pitches this spring before a strained calf forced him to the sideline. He finally made his second appearance Wednesday , and if he wasn't completely sharp, that was understandable and fine. He came out of his two-inning appearance against the Diamondbacks healthy and went on to throw a simulated inning in the bullpen.
SPORTS
March 7, 2014 | By David Wharton
This time, at least, Tiger Woods and his sore back held up through 18 holes of golf. Less than a week after withdrawing from the Honda Classic, Woods finished a storm-delayed first round at the WGC-Cadillac Championship, in Doral, Fla., on Friday morning. There were no outward signs of pain in his play except on the leaderboard, where he stood at 4-over 76. Patrick Reed shot a 4-under 68 to hold the early lead. Jason Dufner, Dustin Johnson, Matt Kuchar and Hunter Mahan headlined a cluster of golfers not far behind.
HEALTH
February 28, 2014 | By Ingrid Schmidt
Given the sunny, body-conscious atmosphere of Los Angeles, it's no surprise to find a thriving field of locally based fitness-wear brands; many of the companies design and produce their lines from start to finish in the city. These new or growing collections, fashionable enough to work over time, range from high performance to high style, geared to lower-intensity, California-centric pastimes such as hiking, beach cycling and yoga. Splits 59 From paint-splattered leggings inspired by artist Jackson Pollock to jackets inset with glossy printed python fabric, the latest collection by Marina del Rey-based Splits 59 is on track with looks from spring fashion runways.
SPORTS
February 13, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
TEMPE, Ariz. - Albert Pujols reported to spring training along with Angels pitchers and catchers Thursday, and his mood seemed to mirror his health. The left-heel injury that hobbled him for four months last season before giving out in late July is fully healed. The surgically repaired right knee that flared up several times in 2013 is sound. Pujols is seven pounds lighter than he was last September, his 6-foot-3, 236-pound frame lean and chiseled from a winter of workouts. And while he will never be compared to Mike Trout on the basepaths, Pujols is feeling as frisky as the 22-year-old speedster.
SPORTS
February 12, 2014 | Broderick Turner
Maybe J.J. Redick could play with his sore right hip, but Clippers Coach Doc Rivers is taking no chances with his starting shooting guard, who will sit out Wednesday night against the Portland Trail Blazers. Redick said his injury has improved, but he will listen to Rivers and miss his fourth straight game. "I don't think that I'll play tomorrow. That's what Doc says," Redick said. "It's a day-to-day thing. " With the All-Star break coming up Thursday through Sunday, Redick will have had two weeks off to make sure his hip is 100% healthy.
OPINION
November 19, 2009
Re "One nation, insured," Editorial, Nov. 16 What seems to have been lost in the healthcare debate is our inalienable right to make choices. This should not be sacrificed for "the greater good." When this healthcare bill passes, we could end up paying for government-mandated insurance we didn't want or need. Or, worse yet, paying for someone else's healthcare besides our own. The state will treat people like criminals if they exercise their right of refusal and opt out. The right to live our lives as we see fit will be pushed aside by bureaucratic meddling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1991
It's wonderful to see all of our five presidents looking so healthy. I wonder what kind of health insurance they have? JUNE MAGUIRE, Mission Viejo
SCIENCE
February 12, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Women considering a mastectomy after being diagnosed with breast cancer often face a difficult decision: whether to remove their healthy breast as well. A new study should make it easier for some of these women to make up their minds. It concludes that patients with a dangerous mutation in their BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene were able to cut their risk of dying from breast cancer nearly in half by opting to remove both breasts. The BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes contain instructions for producing tumor suppressor proteins, which repair damaged DNA and keep cells from turning cancerous.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Hundreds of millions of dollars in government spending to promote healthy marriages seems to have had little effect on marriage and divorce trends, a new study has found. The federal government will have spent roughly $800 million on its Healthy Marriage Initiative by the end of the federal fiscal year, according to the federal Administration for Children and Families. The money, drawn from the welfare budget, has funded a range of programs to help couples have better relationships. But the initiative does not seem to have changed state marriage or divorce rates.
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