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Healthy Families Program

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NEWS
October 3, 1997 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just six weeks after he proposed a major new health initiative for children, Gov. Pete Wilson signed the slightly modified plan into law Thursday, creating the largest new medical program in California since Congress passed Medicaid in 1965.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- California children face a more difficult time finding dental coverage after the state changed their healthcare plan, according to a new report. The report, released by a Santa Monica-based advocacy organization Children's Partnership, examined dental coverage for children from low-income families who have been moved out of the Healthy Families program and into Medi-Cal. A number of dentist offices said they were not accepting new Medi-Cal patients or were not part of the program despite being listed on a government website, the report said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2010 | By Shane Goldmacher and Evan Halper, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is expected to present a revised budget plan Friday that would dismantle some of California's landmark healthcare programs after efforts to scale them back have been reversed by federal courts. The rulings, issued mostly over the last two years, have already forced the state to unwind roughly $2.4 billion in cuts approved by the governor and Legislature and have alarmed other financially strapped states seeking ways to balance their budgets.
OPINION
December 2, 2012
In a bid to cut the state's healthcare bills, the Brown administration will begin shuttering the Healthy Families insurance program for low-income children on Jan. 1. More than 850,000 kids will be shifted over the course of the year into HMOs that participate in Medi-Cal, California's version of the federally subsidized Medicaid program. It may be too late now for the Legislature to rescue Healthy Families from its untimely and potentially disruptive end, even though lawmakers are heading to Sacramento on Monday to begin a special session devoted to healthcare issues.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1999 | Alex Katz, (949) 574-4206
The Saddleback Valley Unified School District will start a campaign this week to sign up low-income families for a federal health care program. About 18 instructional aides will learn how to help parents apply for the Healthy Families program, which provides inexpensive medical insurance to children. Bilingual district aides will be trained in the application process Friday at El Toro High School. The district will hold a sign-up meeting at El Toro High School in October.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001
"Salt in California's Wounds" (editorial, Aug. 8) lauded the governor's expansion of California's Healthy Families program. This expansion effort lacks any semblance of accountability. The state budget provision signed by the governor would enable adult members living in a family of four that earns 250% of the federal poverty level--approximately $44,000 a year--to become eligible for comprehensive health, dental and vision coverage presently available for low-income children. This budget provision also enables people wanting to take advantage of this taxpayer-subsidized coverage to merely self-certify that they are eligible for the Healthy Families program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1998 | HOLLY EDWARDS
Jewish Family Service of Los Angeles is seeking volunteers to help people apply for the Healthy Families Program, which provides health insurance for uninsured children, ages 1 to 19, in low-income working families. Initiated in July, the $197-million federal- and state-funded program provides coverage for doctor visits, hospital care, prescription drugs, dental care and glasses, said Peter Anderson, deputy director of the Managed Risk Medical Insurance Board, which administers the program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1998
Re "Group Sues U.S. Over Curbs on Free Shots," May 13: The California Medical Assn. is suing the federal government over its refusal to allow the state Healthy Families Program to participate in the federal Vaccines for Children Program. Whether or not federal policy is changed, all children enrolled in Healthy Families will receive free immunizations. All health plans were told to include the cost of immunizations in the rate they charge to the state. Health plans will notify parents when their children should have their free preventive care visits (which include immunizations)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 2013 | By Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- California children face a more difficult time finding dental coverage after the state changed their healthcare plan, according to a new report. The report, released by a Santa Monica-based advocacy organization Children's Partnership, examined dental coverage for children from low-income families who have been moved out of the Healthy Families program and into Medi-Cal. A number of dentist offices said they were not accepting new Medi-Cal patients or were not part of the program despite being listed on a government website, the report said.
OPINION
September 27, 1998
Last year, Congress passed a $24-billion program to help states extend health insurance to children of low-income parents. California got a huge, $2.6-billion slice of that pie, and with good reason: 1.7 million California children have no health insurance, about one in six of the total uninsured children in the country. Nearly 40% of these children live in Los Angeles County.
OPINION
August 31, 2012
One of Gov. Jerry Brown's budget-cutting moves this year was to end the Healthy Families insurance program for low-income children and cover them instead through Medi-Cal, the state's version of Medicaid. Now, at the very end of the legislative session, a bipartisan group of lawmakers is pushing to restore the program and boost its funding. Although we're skeptical of 11th hour bills, we agree that Healthy Families should be reinstated. Healthy Families is California's version of the State Children's Health Insurance Program, which Congress created in 1997 to provide coverage for low-income children whose parents weren't poor enough to qualify for Medicaid.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2010 | By Shane Goldmacher and Evan Halper, Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Sacramento Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger is expected to present a revised budget plan Friday that would dismantle some of California's landmark healthcare programs after efforts to scale them back have been reversed by federal courts. The rulings, issued mostly over the last two years, have already forced the state to unwind roughly $2.4 billion in cuts approved by the governor and Legislature and have alarmed other financially strapped states seeking ways to balance their budgets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2009 | Patrick McGreevy and Evan Halper
A state board voted today to begin terminating healthcare coverage for tens of thousands of low-income children on Oct. 1, the result of budget cuts recently signed into law by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. More than 60,000 children, up for annual reevaluation of their coverage next month, would be dropped from the Healthy Families program in October under the action by the state Managed Risk Medical Insurance Board. The board is scrambling to secure funding from other sources, including the Legislature and money set aside by voters for early childhood education.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2008 | Jordan Rau, Rau is a Times staff writer.
The state's healthcare program for the working poor received a temporary reprieve Monday when First 5 California's board voted to provide $16.8 million to avert imminent enrollment restrictions that were expected to leave 162,000 children without medical coverage in the next six months. The money will allow the Healthy Families Program to continue enrolling children through the end of the fiscal year in June instead of capping enrollment, as state officials planned to do Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2008 | Jordan Rau, Rau is a Times staff writer.
State officials are considering capping enrollment in California's health insurance program for children of the working poor, as an influx of new clients overwhelms it. If the Healthy Families Program were to be restricted, it would be the first such drastic action in its 10-year history, advocates said. As many as 162,750 children could end up on a waiting list within six months, according to a memorandum from Lesley Cummings, the executive director of the Managed Risk Medical Insurance Board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 2007 | Susannah Rosenblatt, Times Staff Writer
When Terry Badillo's teenage daughter Denise became pregnant, she didn't know what to do. Badillo's husband had health insurance through his job, but it didn't cover Denise, then 17. The Monterey Park homemaker, who made call after fruitless call for help, remembers that uncertainty a couple of years ago as "a terrible time." Badillo eventually learned about Maternal and Child Health Access, a Los Angeles nonprofit agency.
NEWS
September 4, 2000 | JULIE MARQUIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Legislature decided in the final hours of its session last week to extend the government-sponsored Healthy Families program to 600,000 low-income parents but failed to pass a measure to pay for the expansion. Even without a clear decision on funding, the move to broaden the program was hailed by many last week as a significant step toward patching gaping holes in California's health coverage for the working poor. Still, major uncertainties remain--starting with whether Democratic Gov.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 2006 | Juliet Chung, Times Staff Writer
Every youngster in California would qualify for health insurance if a bevy of legislative proposals and local efforts goes forward, creating what advocates say is the most promising moment in years for children's healthcare. In his revised budget, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has proposed spending $58 million, which would draw nearly as much in federal matching funds, to expand children's health coverage.
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