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Hearing Aids

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1985
I've learned President Reagan has been given $3,000 worth of hearing aids. Will someone please donate the batteries? JOHN DYKZEUL Paramount
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SPORTS
January 16, 2014 | Sam Farmer
RENTON, Wash. - For Seattle fullback Derrick Coleman, the Seahawks' home field is the loudest stadium he's never heard. Coleman is legally deaf, and has been since he was 3, so he won't have need for earplugs Sunday when the Seahawks play host to San Francisco in the NFC championship game. "I feel it, I don't exactly hear it," he said of the noise at CenturyLink Field, where twice this season the Seahawks "12th Man" set Guinness Book records for being the world's loudest crowd at a sporting event.
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HEALTH
February 28, 2000
Over the centuries, many creative devices were designed to help people hear better. Here is a look at how hearing aids have evolved. Late 1700s-1800s Conversation tubes: The narrow end was placed in a person's ear canal, and people spoke into the wide end, achieving modest amplification. 1800s Beginning in the early 17th century, people placed rams' horns to their ears to amplify sounds. In later centuries, people used many types of ear trumpets, like this one from the 1800s.
NEWS
June 29, 2013
By Kari Howard I was introduced to one of this week's bands, Balmorhea, in a video for a song called “Pyrakantha.”   If I needed an excuse, the short film made me fall in love with Los Angeles again. Showing a skateboarder making his way through the city as darkness falls and streetlights and neon signs flicker on, it doesn't romanticize Los Angeles. You see the incongruity of geese honking in the concrete of the L.A. River. Children eating ice cream cones outside Ray's Market & Liquor.
NEWS
February 10, 1988 | United Press International
President Reagan is wearing a new high-tech hearing aid that has a remote control to turn up the volume and filters out background noise, including helicopter engines, a White House spokeswoman said today. Leslye Arsht, deputy White House press secretary, said the new hearing aid, delivered Tuesday, "reduces the feedback" that the President has had with his previous hearing aids. It also helps him hear better on the telephone, she said.
NEWS
June 17, 1993
The state board that licenses hearing aid dispensers has revoked the license of Kay C. Lumas of Altadena seven years after she was convicted of Medi-Cal fraud. Kathleen Molly Wilson, chair of the Department of Consumer Affairs' Hearing Aid Dispensers Examining Committee, announced Monday that Lumas' license had been revoked because of fraudulent billings to Medi-Cal. Dispensers fit and sell hearing aids.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1993 | SAM ENRIQUEZ
State authorities on Friday revoked the license of a Tarzana businessman who sold a one-size-fits-all hearing aid, advertising a money-back guarantee and famous clients such as former President Ronald Reagan. William George Brennan, 65, has been stripped of his state license to dispense hearing aids, said M. Elizabeth Ware, executive officer of the Department of Consumer Affairs' hearing aid dispensers examining committee.
NEWS
April 22, 1993
Following a Federal Trade Commission investigation, a hearing-aid seller with offices in the San Gabriel Valley has agreed to stop allegedly "false and misleading" advertising that indicates Medicare pays for hearing aids and tests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1995 | TIM MAY
A Chatsworth dispenser of hearing aids has been placed on probation for five years by the state Department of Consumer Affairs for "repeated negligent acts, fraud and gross incompetence," officials said Monday. After an investigation prompted by consumer complaints, the state Hearing Aid Dispensers Examining Committee accused Coleman Shuwarger of "repeatedly issuing aids that did not improve patients' hearing and failure to perform proper tests or maintain patient charts."
NEWS
January 21, 1988 | Joseph N. Bell
When my father was in a nursing home many years ago, he shared a room with an elderly stroke victim whose paralytic tongue was unable to form words. While I was in their room one day, a nurse came to take my father's roommate away for a bath. He had already been given a bath by another nurse, but when he tried to convey this, the words wouldn't come out. He had been one of the largest contractors in his city, accustomed to giving orders, and now he couldn't make his most basic needs known.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 2012 | Kevin Berger
Stories pour out of Gabriela Lena Frank like music. Sitting on an old brown leather chair in her little house, where she lives with her grand piano, books and black Labrador retriever, she is describing her upbringing and musical education with passion and joy and not a note of calculation. The composer has electric-black curly hair and a mind as alive as morning light. Before she finishes her cup of tea, she has described, like a magical character in a Gabriel Garcia Marquez novel, the influence on her music of her father, a Jewish Mark Twain scholar who grew up in the Bronx; her mother, a Peruvian whose Chinese grandfather sold shovels to miners in the 1800s; her congenital hearing loss; Graves' disease, which has diminished her eyesight; bodybuilders and Andes Mountain Indian runners; and her perfect pitch, which Frank's piano teacher discovered when Frank was 10, after Frank informed her that a harp recording of Bach's Prelude in C was really in the key of F. Frank, 39, is also glad to help journalists who stammer like flummoxed tourists to categorize her. "I'm a Berkeley gringa, Latino, Peruvian, Chinese, Lithuanian Jew, deaf, short composer!"
HEALTH
January 9, 2012 | By Terri Goldstein, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Imagine yourself in a country where nobody speaks your language. It becomes a necessity to rely on your other senses and hone your powers of observation. You welcome the times when you can "fill in the blanks" and get the gist of a conversation. Each situation is stressful: Will you be a participant or an observer? This is the life of a hearing-impaired person. We are not deaf, and, therefore, most of us do not read lips, sign or wear hearing devices 100% of the time. We try to preserve whatever hearing we have left.
NEWS
March 1, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times
If you're older, chances are you're at a higher risk for hearing loss -- in a recent study about 63% of adults over 70 had it. But the same study found that being black may have a protective effect. While about 64% of whites in the study showed some hearing loss, only 43% of blacks did. The study, published online recently in the Journal of Gerontology: Medical Sciences , analyzed data from a two-year cycle of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, an ongoing national health research program.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2011 | By Gregory Karp
If you think Bluetooth is a rare dental condition and an app is what you eat before the entree, you might not be a candidate for today's high-tech, whiz-bang smart phones. Instead, you might be happier with a mobile phone geared toward seniors. Those phones typically don't have Web-surfing capability, GPS maps and video games. Instead they have large buttons, oversized digital readouts and hearing-aid compatibility, along with a relatively simple calling plan. Although senior-friendly phones aren't new, their lower prices and variety are. A recent price skirmish among wireless companies means seniors can get an easy-to-use cellphone and cheap service to go with it, said Mac Haddow, senior fellow on public policy for the independent and nonprofit Alliance for Generational Equity.
SPORTS
October 17, 2008 | Chris Foster, Times Staff Writer
Two moments that showed what UCLA tailback Derrick Coleman could accomplish and what he had to overcome came before he was 3 years old. "We had an Easter at his grandmother's house when he was 1; the kids had to wait while we hid the eggs," said May Hamlin, Coleman's mother. "When it was time, Derrick just plowed through everyone, running over the other kids. "His older cousin said right then, 'That kid is going to be a football player.'
BUSINESS
March 29, 2008 | From Reuters
The Food and Drug Administration said Friday that it wanted to fine Advanced Bionics, a Sylmar-based maker of cochlear implant hearing aids, $2.2 million for alleged manufacturing violations that put patients at risk. The FDA accused Advanced Bionics of failing to follow manufacturing standards to ensure the safety and quality of the hearing aids.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2008 | Tina Daunt, Times Staff Writer
NEW YORK -- When you're born in no man's land, nothing seems more distant than a place you can call home. Josh Swiller, the Yale-educated son of a prominent family, grew up on Manhattan's Upper West Side, but was nonetheless born on one of America's invisible margins, the silent world of the deaf. Swiller recounts in a newly released memoir how his search for a place in the world took him as far from Central Park as he could imagine, and how he found friendship, affection and a sense of himself alongside a river in Zambia.
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