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Hearing Loss

SCIENCE
February 14, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
For the first time, researchers have restored hearing in deaf mammals, a feat that represents a major step toward the treatment of the 27 million Americans with acquired hearing loss. By inserting a corrective gene with a virus, the team induced the formation of cochlear hair cells -- the key intermediaries in converting sound waves into electrical impulses -- in the ears of artificially deafened adult guinea pigs.
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SCIENCE
August 18, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Teenagers aren't necessarily tuning out adults; they simply might not be able to hear them. The proportion of teens in the United States with slight hearing loss has increased 30% in the last 15 years, and the number with mild or worse hearing loss has increased 77%, researchers said Tuesday. One in every five teens now has at least a slight hearing loss, which can affect learning, speech perception, social skills development and self-image; one in every 20 has a more severe loss.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1991 | JOHN HENKEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An autobiography may seem rather premature from a 26-year-old, Evelyn Glennie (24 when she wrote it) immediately concedes. But then, how many deaf percussionists are busy releasing CDs on a major label contract and touring to the tune of 100 concerts a season? "I've kept a diary since I was 11," she explains about her book, "Good Vibrations." "I happen to enjoy reading about people, myself, and I felt a real need to do it. It's written in a very lighthearted way, which seemed right at the time.
HEALTH
September 10, 2001 | LINDA MARSA, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
A powerful and potentially addictive painkiller used by millions of Americans is causing rapid hearing loss, even deafness, in some patients who are misusing the drug, according to hearing researchers in Los Angeles and elsewhere. So far, at least 48 patients have been identified by doctors at the House Ear Institute in Los Angeles and several other medical centers who have treated patients with sudden hearing loss.
NEWS
May 20, 2007 | Linell Smith, Baltimore Sun
Having trouble getting the buzz at the party because there's too much, er, buzz? Do those S's, F's, T's and Th's sound alike? A growing number of 40- and 50-somethings, baby boomers who grew up on rock music, played in bands and enjoyed living loud, are seeking a new form of high-tech relief: Digital hearing devices that help recapture the high-pitch frequency sounds they're beginning to lose.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2001 | STEVE CARNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Thanks to experimental drugs and cutting-edge technology, Rush Limbaugh will likely not go deaf and will continue to host his talk-radio program, his doctors and a spokesman for his show said Thursday. At the House Ear Clinic and Institute in Los Angeles, the specialists treating Limbaugh for the sudden and profound hearing loss he announced Monday explained the cause and treatment of his deafness, a rare condition called auto-immune inner ear disease, or AIED.
HEALTH
March 31, 2003 | Martin Miller, Times Staff Writer
Bruce McClymonds couldn't believe his ears. In a meeting, a colleague confided that his daughter had been missing for three days, and he wasn't sure another search would be mounted. The director nodded sympathetically but motioned to proceed with the agenda. Astonished, McClymonds rose from his chair and exclaimed: "Wait a minute! We've got to get out of this room right now and start looking for his daughter." The dramatic appeal drew nothing but laughter. "Dog!" corrected another colleague.
HEALTH
February 28, 2000 | ROSIE MESTEL, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Why are they advertising the Cleveland Symphony Orchestra all over the Philadelphia airport? Carren Stika wondered as she traipsed toward baggage claim. She stopped at a pay phone and noticed the area code: 216. "That's when I realized--oh, no! I'm in Ohio!" she says. Stika hadn't heard the garbled buzz of the in-flight announcement, so she hadn't known about the unscheduled touchdown in Cleveland. A fuzzy speech signal; the fuzzy ability of her ears to hear. Combining to confound her again.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | DEBORAH SULLIVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Francine Hokin Katz's lips move but she doesn't speak to her class at the Arcadia Community Center. Even when she makes sounds, however, many of her students can hear little more. Yet, thanks to the class, they understand what she's saying. Katz teaches lip-reading to more than 200 moderately to severely hearing-impaired senior citizens in the San Gabriel Valley each week. For some it's a hedge against future hearing loss, or a backup to hearing aids.
HEALTH
October 22, 2001 | JAMIE TALAN, NEWSDAY
Rush Limbaugh's revelation that he is going deaf has resonated through a nation that has 28 million people who are hard of hearing or experience total hearing loss. Doctors at the House Ear Clinic in Los Angeles diagnosed the controversial radio personality as having an autoimmune disorder that attacked his inner ear. About 1,000 people in the United States will experience sudden and unexplained deafness in both ears this year because of an autoimmune attack.
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