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NEWS
June 30, 1996 | FRANK CLIFFORD, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
For the better part of a century, the mountains and coastal moors that William Randolph Hearst regarded as the most beautiful countryside on earth has remained almost as wild and empty as when he first saw them. Along with neighboring Big Sur, this is one of those epic stretches of sculpted rock, roiling sea and teeming wildlife that makes the California coast one of nature's grand stage sets. Yet this land is also private property.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2013 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before gearing up for yet another TV press tour. The Skinny: I caught up on the last two episodes of CBS's "Under the Dome" over the weekend. I've decided viewers needs to watch "Under the Dome" as if they were watching "Sharknado. " If I nitpick, I'll turn it off after five minutes. But if I goof on it, it is tolerable. Monday's headlines include the weekend box office recap and speculation about the future of CNBC anchor Maria Bartiromo. Daily Dose: CBS and Time Warner Cable have just over two days to either agree to a new distribution deal or extend the old one. Otherwise, CBS content will disappear from millions of Time Warner Cable subscribers in New York, Los Angeles and elsewhere around the country.
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BUSINESS
November 2, 1989 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't so long ago that Hearst Corp. was seen as the stodgy old man of the media world. The company that William Randolph Hearst founded in 1887 was burdened with troubled newspapers in central cities and run by a management whose highest goal, many outsiders felt, was to cling desperately to the faded glory of its past. In this decade, the New York-based company has moved with a new vigor.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
Roku Inc., which makes devices to stream online content on television sets, said Wednesday it has received $60 million from investors including New York publishing giant Hearst Corp. The Saratoga, Calif., company said the Series F round was led by a "leading institutional investor," which the company did not name. The round included participation by BSkyB and News Corp., in addition to Hearst. The Apple TV competitor said the new funding will help it build its streaming software and services businesses.
BUSINESS
December 7, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Hearst Corp. said it would boost its investment in Hearst-Argyle Television Inc. to as much as 82%, less than two months after dropping a plan to buy out minority investors. The purchase of as many as 8 million additional shares will allow Hearst Corp. to consolidate results of Hearst-Argyle for U.S. income tax, New York-based Hearst-Argyle said in a regulatory filing. As of Wednesday, Hearst Corp. owned a 74% stake.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2007 | From Times Wire Services
Hearst Corp., publisher of the San Francisco Chronicle and almost 200 magazines, plans to offer about $593.1 million for the stock of Hearst-Argyle Television Inc. it doesn't already own. The cash offer of $23.50 a share represented a 15% premium over Hearst-Argyle's closing share price Thursday, closely held Hearst Corp. said. Hearst Corp. owns a 73% stake in Hearst-Argyle, whose sales and profit have been hurt by a decline in advertising revenue. Hearst-Argyle shares jumped $4.
NEWS
January 20, 1998 | FRANK CLIFFORD and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Subject to a will that threatens rebellious heirs with disinheritance, descendants of William Randolph Hearst are just now daring to break a long silence over the management of their legendary holdings. The impetus for speaking out is the controversy over a proposed commercial development on the 77,000-acre Hearst ranch at San Simeon. The rare public disagreements have brought into view an underlying division between at least some members of the famous family and its hired managers.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tribune Co. agreed to sell two Connecticut newspapers to Hearst Corp. for $62.4 million, less than Gannett Co. had planned to pay for them before canceling the deal in May. The Stamford Advocate and Greenwich Time will be managed by Denver-based MediaNews Group Inc. in a joint venture with Hearst, said Chicago-based Tribune, also parent of the Los Angeles Times. Connecticut Atty. Gen. Richard Blumenthal said his office planned to investigate the sale to see if it violates antitrust laws.
BUSINESS
July 28, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hearst to Raise Ad Rates 5%: The New York-based company also said it will raise prices and slash circulation by 10% in the sharpest response yet by a magazine publisher to rising paper costs. In an internal memo, the publisher of 13 titles including Esquire, Harper's Bazaar and Popular Mechanics said its paper costs have risen 37% from a year ago and that more increases are expected. Hearst Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 2013 | By Joe Flint
One of the longest-serving chief executives in the media industry is stepping down. Frank A. Bennack Jr., chief executive of Hearst Corp. since 1979, will give up that title in June. Steven Swartz, currently president and chief operating officer, will become CEO. Bennack will remain vice chairman of the Hearst Board. Although best known for its magazine unit, which includes Cosmopolitan and Esquire, Hearst also has a major presence in the TV industry. It owns stakes in several powerful cable networks including ESPN, A&E, History and Lifetime.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Scott Sassa has resigned as president of entertainment and syndication of Hearst Corp. Sassa's resignation was confirmed Thursday after the New York Post published a story saying Sassa had been cavorting with strippers and one -- in partnership with her boyfriend -- had tried to blackmail him and sent texts he'd written to senior officials at the magazine and television company. A Hearst spokesman declined to comment beyond confirming Sassa's resignation. Sassa did not immediately respond to request for comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Joe Flint
Consulting firm Beck Media & Marketing is acquiring Insignia Public Relations, which is run by veteran Hollywood media strategist Eddie Michaels. While Beck Media & Marketing focuses primarily on the digital space, Michaels is something of an old school public relations man who wotks with both actors and producers including Illumination Entertainment, the family animation company behind "Despicable Me. " Michaels is also something of a crisis specialist and last week was retained by "Two and a Half Men" co-star Angus T. Jones after a video of the actor blasting the show became public.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Joe Flint
Hearst Corp. continued its push to become a force in unscripted programming. The media conglomerate struck an agreement to acquire a 50% stake in NorthSouth Productions, whose television credits include "Say Yes to the Dress. " Terms of the deal were not disclosed. "This partnership gives us a significantly stronger presence in cable network production, which is experiencing a steady growth in overall demand,” said Hearst Chairman Frank Bennack. Although Hearst is still best known as a newspaper and magazine publisher, it has ownership stakes in cable networks A&E, History, Lifetime and ESPN.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 2012 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
Phoebe Hearst Cooke, who was a granddaughter of publishing tycoon William Randolph Hearst and used one of the nation's biggest fortunes to support a variety of philanthropic causes, has died. She was 85. Cooke, who had pneumonia, died Sunday in a Templeton, Calif., hospital, according to a statement from the Hearst Corp., the media company she served as a director for 36 years. Her twin brother, George Randolph Hearst Jr., who was a former publisher of the Los Angeles Herald Examiner, died in June after a stroke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 2012 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
The demise of the Hearst newspaper empire in Los Angeles began in 1962 when publisher George Randolph Hearst Jr. abandoned the morning newspaper market. Hearst and the company that owned the Los Angeles Times made what some viewed as a back-room deal: At almost the same time, they folded editions that directly competed with each other. A sister paper of The Times, the afternoon daily Mirror, stopped publishing while the Hearst Corp. "merged" the morning Examiner with the afternoon Herald-Express.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2001 | Bloomberg News
The Federal Trade Commission on Friday approved Hearst Corp.'s agreement to divest its Medi-Span unit and forfeit $19 million in profit to settle charges that it tried to monopolize the drug database market. The agreement marks the first time the FTC has obtained forfeiture of profit in a merger case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2004 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
Negotiations to preserve the Hearst Ranch at San Simeon are moving again as Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's administration is pursuing the project and focusing on turning the most visible part of the ranch -- 18 miles of coastline -- into state parkland. Although the Hearst Corp. has long floated the idea of preserving its historic family ranch for a price, only this week have details begun to emerge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2011
John Randolph Hearst Jr. Grandson and heir of William Randolph Hearst John Randolph Hearst Jr., 77, a grandson of media titan William Randolph Hearst and heir to the family fortune, died Friday in New York, Hearst Corp. said in a statement. The cause was not disclosed. Nicknamed "Bunky," Hearst spent most of his career at the company his grandfather founded. Besides serving on the board, he was a trustee of the Hearst Family Trust and a director of the Hearst Foundations.
BUSINESS
April 12, 2011 | Meg James, Los Angeles Times
Hearst Corp. said "You're hired" to mega-television producer Mark Burnett. Hearst and the producer of such popular reality shows as "The Apprentice" and "Survivor" on Monday announced a 50/50 joint venture that will charge Burnett with the task of creating television shows for the media giant. Hearst owns more than two dozen TV stations along with stakes in cable TV networks Lifetime, A&E, History Channel and ESPN as well as newspapers and magazines. "We were not looking to be in the television production business," Scott Sassa, president of Hearst Entertainment & Syndication, said in an interview.
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