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Hearst Corp

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2001 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Overcoming an intense lobbying effort by the Hearst Corp. and real estate interests, the Assembly on Monday passed a measure that would close a loophole speculators have used to earn millions by threatening to build on scenic property. Called a solution to a practice characterized by critics as "environmental terrorism," the measure obtained the minimum 41 votes needed for approval. It now goes back to the Senate for a final vote.
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NEWS
September 5, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS and JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Lawmakers launched an eleventh-hour attempt Tuesday to thwart Hearst Corp. from subdividing some of California's most renowned coastal property as a prelude to opening it up to extensive development. Proponents of the bill hope it will not only protect the sweeping tablelands below Hearst Castle on the Central Coast but also curb an increasingly popular tactic of using historic property records to circumvent zoning restrictions and increase land values.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hearst Corp. has agreed to postpone any development of its historic ranch in San Simeon for six months to allow two national conservation groups to come up with a plan to preserve the property forever. Hearst picked the Nature Conservancy and the Conservation Fund as its "conservation partners." These groups will try to raise public and private money for a deal that would set aside most, if not all, of the picturesque property from development. "It's a great opportunity," said Stephen T.
OPINION
August 5, 2001
After visiting Hearst Castle for the first time recently, I'm thinking that we Californians might as well give back the castle and its acreage to the Hearst Corp. so it can be developed. After all, whatever they do can't be any worse than what our state parks' management has done with it. William Randolph Hearst must be smiling in his grave at the class warfare that continues to be waged against visitors to his castle, with huge herds of them being bused through while loudspeakers blare a long list of rules.
OPINION
July 29, 2001
Re "In Hearst Land Fight, Old Papers Are New Weapon," July 22: So, let me get this straight. Stephen Hearst wants the taxpayers to fork over $300 million to preserve the Hearst ranch for his children in perpetuity. In return, all he asks is the opportunity to build a [possible] 650-room destination golf resort that will snarl traffic, dewater steelhead streams, pollute our beaches and overwhelm the local schools for our children. No wonder the Hearst Corp. has to hire Bruce Babbitt to grease the political skids and rev up its PR machine.
NEWS
June 6, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS and MARGARET TALEV, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Former Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt, in his first prominent role since leaving government, is helping the Hearst Corp. broker a deal worth $200 million or more that will determine the fate of Hearst's fabled seaside ranch at San Simeon. Babbitt also has been hired by a developer hoping to jump-start stalled plans to build a mini-city of 3,050 homes on Ahmanson Ranch in rural Ventura County, just northwest of Calabasas.
NEWS
February 16, 2001 | SALLY ANN CONNELL and JOHN JOHNSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Hearst Corp. formally unveiled its new, more conciliatory plan Thursday to build a long-stalled resort along a windswept stretch of the Central Coast--a plan that immediately drew a familiar chorus of skepticism. "The Hearst project is really unchanged from what it has always been," said Doug Buckmaster, a spokesman for Friends of the Ranchland. "What's changed is the tack they are taking. It's smoother."
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hearst Corp., seeking to resurrect a long-stalled plan to build a resort along an unspoiled stretch of the Central Coast, has made an offer it calls a compromise but some environmental activists see as a potential trap. Under the proposal, Hearst would sell its right to develop 83,000 acres--most of its vast coastal land holdings--if it receives permission to build the resort on 257 coastal acres near the famed Hearst Castle at San Simeon.
NEWS
November 17, 2000 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Hearst Corp. took two major steps to end a fierce 100-year newspaper rivalry and launch what it promises will be a world-class newspaper Thursday night. It named a new publisher and top editing team for the Chronicle, which it will begin publishing Wednesday, and it released a report exonerating its current newspaper, the Examiner, of charges that had undermined its editorial integrity. The report was the result of an investigation by former federal Judge Charles Renfrew.
NEWS
July 29, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Hearst Corp. completed its $660 million purchase of the rival San Francisco Chronicle on Friday and kept its promise to sell its venerable San Francisco Examiner to a local publisher of free papers. Hearst announced the changes in ownership a day after U.S. District Court Judge Vaughn Walker ruled out antitrust questions in Hearst's purchase of the Chronicle.
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