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Hearst Corp

BUSINESS
March 4, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Hearst Corp. announced Monday the sudden departure of San Francisco Chronicle Publisher John Oppedahl, who is leaving the company after less than three years on the job. Oppedahl will be succeeded by Associate Publisher Steven Falk. Spokespeople for Hearst and the Chronicle said they had no information on whether Oppedahl resigned or was fired.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2003 | John Johnson, Times Staff Writer
This county's highest elected body took the unusual step Tuesday of endorsing a deal to preserve the Hearst Ranch, even though the deal isn't done yet. The Board of Supervisors voted 5 to 0 to support the framework of an agreement between the Hearst Corp. and the American Land Conservancy that would save the 82,000-acre ranch from development and keep much of it in agriculture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 8, 2002 | John Johnson and Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writers
It was to be called Piedra Blanca, a gleaming new city at the edge of an untroubled sea. It was 1965. The Hearst family had big plans for its majestic 82,000-acre coastal ranch. In place of the stark and mostly treeless landscape, there would arise a thriving city of 65,000 people. There would be hotels, businesses, Hearst Airport and a bustling marina. Think Santa Monica at the foot of Hearst Castle, but move it just down the road from Big Sur.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2002 | Kenneth R. Weiss and John Johnson, Times Staff Writers
The Hearst Corp. is considering a $100-million conservation deal that would forsake previous development plans for its historic family ranch and deed virtually all of its oceanfront acreage -- the ranchland west of California Highway 1 -- to the state, sources said Tuesday. At the same time, the family would like to hold on to a few private beaches along its 18 miles of spectacular coastline and retain the option to build homes on 27 different lots for future Hearst generations, sources said.
BUSINESS
December 15, 2001 | Bloomberg News
The Federal Trade Commission on Friday approved Hearst Corp.'s agreement to divest its Medi-Span unit and forfeit $19 million in profit to settle charges that it tried to monopolize the drug database market. The agreement marks the first time the FTC has obtained forfeiture of profit in a merger case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2001 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO and JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Overcoming an intense lobbying effort by the Hearst Corp. and real estate interests, the Assembly on Monday passed a measure that would close a loophole speculators have used to earn millions by threatening to build on scenic property. Called a solution to a practice characterized by critics as "environmental terrorism," the measure obtained the minimum 41 votes needed for approval. It now goes back to the Senate for a final vote.
NEWS
September 5, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS and JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Lawmakers launched an eleventh-hour attempt Tuesday to thwart Hearst Corp. from subdividing some of California's most renowned coastal property as a prelude to opening it up to extensive development. Proponents of the bill hope it will not only protect the sweeping tablelands below Hearst Castle on the Central Coast but also curb an increasingly popular tactic of using historic property records to circumvent zoning restrictions and increase land values.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hearst Corp. has agreed to postpone any development of its historic ranch in San Simeon for six months to allow two national conservation groups to come up with a plan to preserve the property forever. Hearst picked the Nature Conservancy and the Conservation Fund as its "conservation partners." These groups will try to raise public and private money for a deal that would set aside most, if not all, of the picturesque property from development. "It's a great opportunity," said Stephen T.
OPINION
August 5, 2001
After visiting Hearst Castle for the first time recently, I'm thinking that we Californians might as well give back the castle and its acreage to the Hearst Corp. so it can be developed. After all, whatever they do can't be any worse than what our state parks' management has done with it. William Randolph Hearst must be smiling in his grave at the class warfare that continues to be waged against visitors to his castle, with huge herds of them being bused through while loudspeakers blare a long list of rules.
OPINION
July 29, 2001
Re "In Hearst Land Fight, Old Papers Are New Weapon," July 22: So, let me get this straight. Stephen Hearst wants the taxpayers to fork over $300 million to preserve the Hearst ranch for his children in perpetuity. In return, all he asks is the opportunity to build a [possible] 650-room destination golf resort that will snarl traffic, dewater steelhead streams, pollute our beaches and overwhelm the local schools for our children. No wonder the Hearst Corp. has to hire Bruce Babbitt to grease the political skids and rev up its PR machine.
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