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Heart And Soul

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
"Number fourteen, home " is an elaborate video requiem for the dead -- specifically for the great Romantic composer Frédéric Chopin but, by implication, for the entire network of cultural relations that made his work possible. Dutch artist and composer Guido van der Werve enacts a metaphoric lament for an era that has passed into history. At Marc Foxx Gallery, the 54-minute video screens every hour on the hour. In three movements and 12 acts, the artist performs a trans-European triathlon of swimming, bicycling and running from Warsaw, where Chopin grew up, to Paris,  where he died of respiratory disease at 39. Chopin was buried at Père Lachaise cemetery, but legend has it that his heart was smuggled out of France and interred at Warsaw's Holy Cross Church.
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SPORTS
March 23, 2014 | By Mike Bresnahan
Point guards are the lifeblood of Coach Mike D'Antoni 's system, the heads of the snake that drive and score or kick out to open shooters in a perfect basketball world (see: Steve Nash , 2005). Too bad none of them can stay healthy on the Lakers. Nash has played only 11 games because of his chronically sore back, Jordan Farmar has played only 36 games and backup point guard Xavier Henry has spent more than two months on the sidelines. Kobe Bryant , a backup point guard for a while, lasted all of six games this season.
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TRAVEL
March 14, 2014 | By Carolyn Lyons
CERRETO, Italy - Think of an Italian summer and you think of azure seas, sun-splashed beaches, cool mountains cupping dark lakes and overheated crowds of tourists investigating every museum and ancient church. Things are different in Tuscany as well as in Umbria, where I live, for part of the year. Every local community, no matter how small, puts on its own summer festa, or festival. Some are based on religion: Each village has its own patron saint to celebrate with a day of services and parades followed by a night of feasting, dancing and, of course, fireworks.
TRAVEL
March 14, 2014 | By Carolyn Lyons
CERRETO, Italy - Think of an Italian summer and you think of azure seas, sun-splashed beaches, cool mountains cupping dark lakes and overheated crowds of tourists investigating every museum and ancient church. Things are different in Tuscany as well as in Umbria, where I live, for part of the year. Every local community, no matter how small, puts on its own summer festa, or festival. Some are based on religion: Each village has its own patron saint to celebrate with a day of services and parades followed by a night of feasting, dancing and, of course, fireworks.
SPORTS
January 13, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
Baseball was drained of its charm and innocence long ago, when it went from being a kids' game to the multibillion-dollar enterprise we know as Baseball Inc. Now the sad spectacle involving Alex Rodriguez and his former drug dealer, Tony Bosch, is robbing the sport of what remains of its heart and soul. Actually "sport" may no longer be the right word, since it implies there is a winner and a loser. Clearly there are no winners in a process that involves liars, drug cheats, death threats, clandestine payments, blood drawn in the bathroom stall of a South Florida nightclub and more shady characters than an episode of "The Sopranos.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2001 | ROBERT HILBURN
* * * 1/2 TRAVIS "The Invisible Band" Epic Travis' lead singer and songwriter, Fran Healy, thinks it's the song, not the band, that is important--hence the album title. But it's the rare group of musicians that delivers music with as much heart and soul as this Scottish quartet.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1994 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When "Frankenstein" opens on Halloween night at the Odyssey Theatre in West L.A., it'll provide chills and thrills, promises director Debbie Devine. It will also dig a little deeper than that. The production, presented by the Glorious Repertory Company, a new group composed of theater professionals, inaugurates "Heart and Soul," a series of three plays that will "celebrate the word, the visual and human interaction."
NEWS
October 24, 2002 | Lina Lecaro, Special to The Times
What does it really mean anymore, for today's rap and R&B artists, to "keep it real"? There's nothing "real" about the designer duds, Bentleys and $200 bottles of Cristal champagne depicted in video after video from many of black music's biggest stars, unless we're talking about a universal street-level fantasy of the good life. Though the recent neo-soul movement represented by the likes of Alicia Keyes, Jill Scott and India.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2007 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
In directing a play or musical from another era, too much faithfulness can sometimes be as damaging as too little. By slavishly adhering to every punctuation mark in a script, you may end up locking your staging into a state of utter irrelevance. In the bubbly Reprise! revival of "Damn Yankees," which opened Wednesday at UCLA's Freud Playhouse, Jason Alexander, in his first season as the company's artistic director, takes substantial liberties.
SPORTS
November 17, 2006
REMEMBERING A TEAMMATE USC basketball players, including RouSean Cromwell (42) and Taj Gibson (22), react during an emotional halftime ceremony at the Galen Center honoring Ryan Francis, who was shot and killed in May. "He was our heart and soul," Athletic Director Mike Garrett said.
SPORTS
January 13, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
Baseball was drained of its charm and innocence long ago, when it went from being a kids' game to the multibillion-dollar enterprise we know as Baseball Inc. Now the sad spectacle involving Alex Rodriguez and his former drug dealer, Tony Bosch, is robbing the sport of what remains of its heart and soul. Actually "sport" may no longer be the right word, since it implies there is a winner and a loser. Clearly there are no winners in a process that involves liars, drug cheats, death threats, clandestine payments, blood drawn in the bathroom stall of a South Florida nightclub and more shady characters than an episode of "The Sopranos.
HOME & GARDEN
September 27, 2013 | Chris Erskine
Bob Newhart has a wonderful old bit where he claims that if you gave enough monkeys enough typewriters, sooner or later they would write all the great books. Whether they would come up with great comedy bits is another matter. You have to think that art isn't merely a mob effort. All it really takes is the right monkey. I used to think that if there were no booze, there would've been no great books. What sun is to citrus, hooch is to the recesses of the literary mind. That's not to say aspiring authors should drink.
NATIONAL
August 6, 2013 | By Benjamin Mueller
A terminally ill 2-year-old boy died just two days after serving as his parents' best man at their wedding in western Pennsylvania. Logan Stevenson, whose inclusion in Saturday's ceremony won his family well-wishers and admirers from across the country, died Monday night after a long battle with leukemia. “Today Logan was doing very bad," Logan's mother, Christine Swidorsky, wrote on Facebook Monday evening, "his breathing was very rapid then slowing down I called hospice to come and she checked him out and she said he's probably gonna pass Sean and I held him all day he was comfortable with his medication then at 8:18 my son took his last breath in my arms Logan passed away im so sad upset and im in disbelief he is with angels and he's in no more pain.no more sickness no more hospitals.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
"Number fourteen, home " is an elaborate video requiem for the dead -- specifically for the great Romantic composer Frédéric Chopin but, by implication, for the entire network of cultural relations that made his work possible. Dutch artist and composer Guido van der Werve enacts a metaphoric lament for an era that has passed into history. At Marc Foxx Gallery, the 54-minute video screens every hour on the hour. In three movements and 12 acts, the artist performs a trans-European triathlon of swimming, bicycling and running from Warsaw, where Chopin grew up, to Paris,  where he died of respiratory disease at 39. Chopin was buried at Père Lachaise cemetery, but legend has it that his heart was smuggled out of France and interred at Warsaw's Holy Cross Church.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2013 | By Mikael Wood, Los Angeles Times
The Grammy Awards are known - at least in the minds of people susceptible to corporate branding efforts - as Music's Biggest Night. But at the 55th ceremony, televised Sunday from Staples Center, it wasn't the grand production numbers that stood out but the smaller, more intimate moments. The pleasant-enough British group Mumford & Sons might have won the night's top award for their album "Babel," but more memorable was Rihanna delivering her stripped-down ballad "Stay" with eyes closed and hands outstretched.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2012 | By Susan Carpenter, Los Angeles Times
It's the rare book that challenges gender presumptions in a way that's as entertaining as it is unexpected and, perhaps most important, that's relatable to teens who may not think they need sensitivity training when it comes to sexual orientation and the nature of true love. "Every Day," from New York Times bestselling author David Levithan, is precisely such a book. Clever, bittersweet and utterly un-put-down-able, "Every Day" is a love story told from the most unusual of perspectives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1990
Now I've heard everything! What happened to compassion and caring about one's fellow men? No wonder this couple do not want their names used--a human life is not as important as the value of a home? If this couple don't have anything else to do besides checking on what their neighbors are doing, give them a cause. God knows, there are plenty of them to zero in on. LOUISE OKEY Huntington Beach
OPINION
April 20, 2007
Re "Free speech and pink slips," Opinion, April 19 Patt Morrison's column was a reminder of the period when the House Un-American Activities Committee wrought havoc with newspaper columnists, educators and actors. Morrison touched on the heart and soul of an issue so great and important and with such history that it ought not stop here. I implore her to go on to tell more tales of Americans who have been punished for their thoughts and words in a newspaper. JERRY ARONOW West Hollywood
SPORTS
February 2, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
From Indianapolis -- The biggest man in the Super Bowl yawns, a gaping chasm of a yawn, and it's as if all the air in the hotel conference room is sucked up under his backward camouflage baseball cap. It's 8:30 a.m. and, clearly, the biggest man in the Super Bowl has just climbed out of bed, his eyes clouded and his face unshaven and his belly bouncing through a tight red T-shirt pulled over his saggy gym shorts. Vince Wilfork, the New England Patriot who hauls at least 350 unruly pounds around on his bulging 6-foot-2 frame, has us right where he wants us. "In the locker room ... we always joke and jive about who is the best athlete," he said Thursday.
TRAVEL
May 1, 2011 | By Lauren Williams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It is said that the takeover of Chile in 1973 by Augusto Pinochet broke the heart of Pablo Neruda, the country's best-known poet. The man who wrote so openly of love and heartache could not bear to see his country in the hands of a military dictator and died days after Pinochet came to power. After his death, some Chileans said Neruda was spared the agony of seeing thousands of his countrymen killed during Pinochet's regime, which lasted until 1989. Revolutions. Dictatorships.
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