Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHeart Attack
IN THE NEWS

Heart Attack

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2006 | Bob Sipchen, Times Staff Writer
SHORTLY after Jeffrey "Toz" Toczylowski's last mission in Iraq a year ago this month, friends received a message. "If you are getting this e-mail, it means that I have passed away," the missive said. "No, it's not a sick Toz joke, but a letter I wanted to write in case this happened." The Army Special Forces captain, 30, said he would like family and friends to attend his burial at Arlington National Cemetery, "but understand if you can't make it."
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
April 23, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Over a five-year period, a government-mandated tracking system in France showed that physicians in that country treated 1,979 patients for serious health problems associated with the use of marijuana, and nearly 2% of those encounters were with patients suffering from cardiovascular problems, including heart attack, cardiac arrhythmia and stroke, and circulation problems in the arms and legs. In roughly a quarter of those cases, the study found, the patient died. In the United States, when young and otherwise healthy patients show up in emergency departments with symptoms of heart attack, stroke, cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrhythmia, physicians have frequently noted in case reports that these unusual patients are regular marijuana users.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 20, 1987 | NIKKI FINKE, Times Staff Writer
He was winding up four days of routine financial meetings in Philadelphia and had told his administrative assistant to confirm his return flight to Los Angeles. He had just finished reading Allan Bloom's "The Closing of the American Mind" and was looking for another good book. He was trying to figure out when he could reschedule dinner with actor Vincent Price. And, as he always did whenever he went out of town, Edgar Rosenberg kept in close telephone contact with his wife. "I spoke to him the day before," comedienne Joan Rivers said Tuesday night, her voice filled with disbelief and anguish.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2014 | By David Colker
John Henson, who occasionally performed as a puppeteer in the Muppets troupe his father founded, died Friday of a heart attack at his home in upstate New York. He was 48 and did not have a history of heart trouble, his sister Cheryl said. His father, Jim Henson, also died young: He was 53 when he died of pneumonia in 1990. John Henson sometimes performed as Sweetums, a large, hairy Muppet who towered over other puppets and humans. Henson played the character for a while at a Muppets movie/live-action attraction at Disney World, where he would suddenly run into the audience near the end to screams of delight from fans, said Brian Jay Jones, whose biography on Jim Henson came out last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1989 | MICHAEL GRANBERRY, Times Staff Writer
Frank Cox, known to generations of San Diegans as "Frank the Trainman" because of a four-decade affiliation with his own model train shop, died Thursday of a heart attack. He was 82. "He was the dean of train collectors," said Tom Sefton, president of San Diego Trust & Savings Bank, who said he and Cox had been friends since 1946. "He was responsible more than anyone else by far for the introduction of trains at Christmas time . . . for the young finding trains under the tree.
OPINION
November 2, 2011 | By Michael D. Lemonick
An obese, middle-aged man is running to catch a bus. Suddenly, he clutches his chest, falls to the ground and dies of a massive heart attack. It turns out that he's a smoker and a diabetic, has high blood pressure, eats a diet high in saturated fat and low in leafy green vegetables, pours salt on everything, drinks too much beer, avoids exercise at all costs and has a father, grandfather and two uncles who also died young of heart attacks. So what killed him? Most people are savvy enough about health risks to know this is a trick question.
SCIENCE
January 29, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Men over 65, as well as younger men with diagnosed heart disease, were at least twice as likely to have non-fatal heart attacks in the 90 days after they were prescribed testosterone medication than were men of the same age and health status who did not get the hormone supplement, a study has found. For men under 65 with no diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, testosterone supplementation did not appear to raise heart attack risk, the study suggests. But among men older than 65, many of whom may have had undiagnosed risk factors, rates of non-fatal heart attack rose as much as threefold in the 90 days after they filled a prescription for testosterone medication.
HEALTH
February 7, 2011 | By Andrea Markowitz, Special to Tribune Newspapers
How can you tell if you or someone you know is having a heart attack? Sometimes the symptoms can be surprisingly subtle. "They can be very different from person to person, between women and men and even within an individual who has more than one heart attack," says Dr. David Rizik, director of Interventional Cardiology for Scottsdale Healthcare Hospitals, in Scottsdale, Ariz. Men and women may experience atypical heart attack symptoms. In contrast to the "classic" chest-splitting, gasping-for-breath symptoms, many heart attacks begin with symptoms that are so mild they are often mistaken for indigestion or muscle ache.
NEWS
March 22, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Heart attacks can be difficult to diagnose. Moreover, doctors often can't tell a cardiac patient whether he or she is likely to suffer another heart attack. A new test to detect a particular substance in the blood may help with that problem but, if adopted for widespread use, it could also dramatically raise the number of heart attack diagnoses. In the study, published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn ., researchers reported success using a more sensitive test to identify troponin, a cardiac muscle protein.
NEWS
November 8, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Heart attacks require emergency treatment. But too many Americans are arriving at a hospital for treatment later than is optimal, researchers said Monday. Experts advise calling 911 for an ambulance if symptoms suggestive of a heart attack do not improve within five minutes. But a study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine found that the average patient arrived at the hospital about 2.6 hours after symptoms began and 11% arrived more than 12 hours after symptoms began.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2014
John Henson Son of Muppets founder Jim Henson John Henson, 48, who occasionally performed as a puppeteer in the famed Muppets troupe his father founded, died Friday of a heart attack at his home in Saugerties, New York. He did not have a history of heart trouble, his sister Cheryl said. His father, Jim Henson, died at age 53 of pneumonia in 1990. John Henson sometimes performed as Sweetums, a large, hairy Muppet who towered over other puppets and humans. Henson played the character for a while at the Muppet*Vision 3D attraction at Disney World, where near the end of the show he would suddenly run into the audience to screams of delight from fans, said Brian Jay Jones, whose Jim Henson biography was published last year.
HEALTH
February 14, 2014 | By Chris Woolston
Now that people in Colorado (and, soon, Washington state) can buy marijuana about as easily as they can pick up a 12-pack of Bud Light, it's a good time to ask: How risky is it to turn to pot? President Obama has already shared his opinion, telling the New Yorker magazine, "I don't think [marijuana] is more dangerous than alcohol. " The president's opinion stands in stark contrast with official federal policy that still classifies marijuana as a Schedule 1 drug, putting it in the same class as heroin and LSD. In this case, the president seems to be more correct than the government, says Richard Miller, professor of pharmacology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.
SCIENCE
January 29, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Men over 65, as well as younger men with diagnosed heart disease, were at least twice as likely to have non-fatal heart attacks in the 90 days after they were prescribed testosterone medication than were men of the same age and health status who did not get the hormone supplement, a study has found. For men under 65 with no diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, testosterone supplementation did not appear to raise heart attack risk, the study suggests. But among men older than 65, many of whom may have had undiagnosed risk factors, rates of non-fatal heart attack rose as much as threefold in the 90 days after they filled a prescription for testosterone medication.
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
Have you seen the "Devil's Due" movie promotion featuring a robotic devil baby in a remote-controlled perambulator? Everyone else has. Posted Monday, the viral video had nearly 9.4 million views on YouTube as of Tuesday afternoon. The stroller approaches people on the sidewalks of New York, and the baby then scares them out of their wits (except for that one guy). The YouTube video is shown in all its gory below (or here for mobile users). Be warned, the fake demon child screams, spews what looks like milk and even flips New Yorkers the bird.  The video doesn't show any fallout from the scares.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2014 | By Paresh Dave
A 60-year-old man charged with murder in the slayings of his ill wife and bedridden sister pleaded not guilty Monday. Lance Holger Anderson is suspected of shooting his wife, Bertha Maxine Anderson, 68, in the head in their Canyon Country apartment on Dec. 11. She had dementia. Later that day, he took a taxi to a North Hills nursing facility where, police said, he fatally shot his  sister, Lisa Florence Nave, 59. She had been there since suffering a heart attack five years ago. Homicide Report: Tracking killings in L.A. County Anderson surrendered outside the nursing home to police, who at the time described the slayings as possible "mercy killings.
SPORTS
January 8, 2014 | Eric Sondheimer
Former Santa Ana Mater Dei water polo standout Jon Walters, a freshman at USC, died on Wednesday of a heart attack, the Orange County Register reported . He was 19. "Heartbroken," former Mater Dei classmate Jeremy Martinez, a USC baseball player, tweeted.
NEWS
February 8, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Heart attacks kill. But not as often as they used to. In fact, you might say heart attacks can start life anew. Leonard Castro knows firsthand. His life was upended by a first heart attack at age 46 and subsequent bypass surgery. Like about 90% of heart attack patients who make it to a hospital, he lived. But he's not living the life he once had. Castro underwent cardiac rehabilitation that included Life Overhaul 101, a wake-up call that covered nutrition, exercise, stress reduction and how to manage medications.
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Researchers have used cardiac stem cells to regenerate heart muscle in patients who have suffered heart attacks, also known as myocardial infarction. The small preliminary study, which was conducted by the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, involved 25 patients who had suffered heart attacks in the previous one and a half to three months.  Seventeen of the study subjects received infusions of stem cells cultured from a raisin-sized chunk of their own heart tissue, which had been removed via catheter.
SCIENCE
January 2, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
As if the fiery rash and painful blisters of shingles were not punishment enough, the average patient who suffers a resurgence of the dormant chickenpox virus known as herpes zoster -- or shingles -- has a higher risk of heart attack or mild stroke two decades or more after the blisters and rash recede, says a new study. For those who suffer a case of shingles between the age of 18 and 40, the outlook is worse: They're more than twice as likely to suffer a mild stroke and 50% more likely to have a heart attack than those who have not had shingles.
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Chris Erskine
Traveling keeps you young. Or at least healthier. That's the finding of a new study linking travel to decreased risks of heart attack and depression and even the promotion of brain health.  The Global Commission on Aging and Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, in partnership with the U.S. Travel Assn., has released research that shows travel offers the same sort of physical and cognitive benefits as crossword puzzles or museum visits....
Los Angeles Times Articles
|