Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHeart Attacks
IN THE NEWS

Heart Attacks

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An autopsy Sunday concluded that a 14-year-old who died in a fistfight had a heart condition, officials said. The unidentified boy went to a park Saturday where he met Joshua Kang, 18, said Buena Park Police Lt. Terry Branum. The pair started a "fun boxing match," Branum said, but the boy went into cardiac arrest after Kang punched him in the chest. Prosecutors will decide this week whether to charge Kang, who was held on $250,000 bail.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SCIENCE
April 23, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Over a five-year period, a government-mandated tracking system in France showed that physicians in that country treated 1,979 patients for serious health problems associated with the use of marijuana, and nearly 2% of those encounters were with patients suffering from cardiovascular problems, including heart attack, cardiac arrhythmia and stroke, and circulation problems in the arms and legs. In roughly a quarter of those cases, the study found, the patient died. In the United States, when young and otherwise healthy patients show up in emergency departments with symptoms of heart attack, stroke, cardiomyopathy and cardiac arrhythmia, physicians have frequently noted in case reports that these unusual patients are regular marijuana users.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 28, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Here's another reason to dread mornings: Heart attacks may be slightly larger early in the day. Scientists already knew that heart attacks were more common in the morning . But they were unsure about the size of those heart attacks. In rodents, the size of heart attacks roughly follows the body's natural circadian rhythms, so they suspected the same might be true of people. Spanish researchers analyzed records of 811 patients brought to the Hospital Clínico San Carlos in Madrid, Spain, between 2003 and 2009 for a STEMI -- ST segment elevation myocardial infarction -- a severe type heart attack.
SCIENCE
January 29, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Men over 65, as well as younger men with diagnosed heart disease, were at least twice as likely to have non-fatal heart attacks in the 90 days after they were prescribed testosterone medication than were men of the same age and health status who did not get the hormone supplement, a study has found. For men under 65 with no diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, testosterone supplementation did not appear to raise heart attack risk, the study suggests. But among men older than 65, many of whom may have had undiagnosed risk factors, rates of non-fatal heart attack rose as much as threefold in the 90 days after they filled a prescription for testosterone medication.
NEWS
October 29, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times, For the Booster Shots Blog
Still nipping out of your workplace or a restaurant to cop a cigarette out on the sidewalk? You are public health hero, and a grateful nation salutes you. Workplaces and eating and drinking establishments that are free of second-hand smoke have shored up Americans' health even in the face of rising levels of obesity and Type 2 diabetes, says a new study. Published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine, the latest research focused on Olmsted County in Minnesota, and tracked the rate of heart attacks and sudden heart attack deaths in the wake of smoking bans that cleared Olmsted County's restaurants, bars and workplaces of tobacco smoke.
SPORTS
April 21, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
A few hours before a wary Landon Donovan ran onto the practice field at the Home Depot Center on Thursday, a funeral took place in Bergamo, Italy. And those two events may have more in common than you think. Piermario Morosini, a 25-year-old midfielder for Livorno in Italy's Serie B, collapsed and died of cardiac arrest in the first half of his team's match last weekend. He was laid to rest Thursday, with thousands of fans packing the streets of his hometown as his coffin, draped in numerous jerseys passed.
SCIENCE
November 6, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
Stem cell therapy may help repair the hearts of patients who have suffered heart attacks, and, according to a new study published Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., it may not matter whether those stem cells come from the patient or a donor. For decades, common belief was that areas of the heart severely damaged by a heart attack could not be repaired. But the development of advanced cell therapies, in which stem cells or other cell types are injected into the damaged area, have provided new hope that interventions may be possible.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2012 | By Matt Donnelly
Rosie O'Donnell blogged some major gratitude Monday: The former daytime host revealed she suffered a heart attack last week. What began as an act of kindness ended in the insertion of a stent, after doctors discovered a 99% blocked artery in O'Donnell's heart. An "enormous" woman Rosie spotted in a Nyack, N.Y., parking lot had asked for help getting out of her car last Tuesday. O'Donnell obliged, writing in her free-form blog style, "it was not easy but together we did it she was up and on her way with gratitude.
SCIENCE
May 23, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
Taking calcium supplements increases the risk of having a heart attack, Swiss and German researchers reported Wednesday. The finding adds to the growing body of evidence that such supplements increase the risk to those who take them while providing only minimal benefits. The study is considered important because large numbers of people, especially elderly women, continue to take the supplements in hopes of minimizing loss of bone density. The body of evidence now seems to suggest that calcium consumed as part of a normal diet can, indeed, increase bone density and perhaps help lower blood pressure, but that supplements may be too risky for most people to take.
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Researchers have used cardiac stem cells to regenerate heart muscle in patients who have suffered heart attacks, also known as myocardial infarction. The small preliminary study, which was conducted by the Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in Los Angeles, involved 25 patients who had suffered heart attacks in the previous one and a half to three months.  Seventeen of the study subjects received infusions of stem cells cultured from a raisin-sized chunk of their own heart tissue, which had been removed via catheter.
NEWS
January 15, 2014 | By Amy Hubbard
Have you seen the "Devil's Due" movie promotion featuring a robotic devil baby in a remote-controlled perambulator? Everyone else has. Posted Monday, the viral video had nearly 9.4 million views on YouTube as of Tuesday afternoon. The stroller approaches people on the sidewalks of New York, and the baby then scares them out of their wits (except for that one guy). The YouTube video is shown in all its gory below (or here for mobile users). Be warned, the fake demon child screams, spews what looks like milk and even flips New Yorkers the bird.  The video doesn't show any fallout from the scares.
SCIENCE
January 2, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
As if the fiery rash and painful blisters of shingles were not punishment enough, the average patient who suffers a resurgence of the dormant chickenpox virus known as herpes zoster -- or shingles -- has a higher risk of heart attack or mild stroke two decades or more after the blisters and rash recede, says a new study. For those who suffer a case of shingles between the age of 18 and 40, the outlook is worse: They're more than twice as likely to suffer a mild stroke and 50% more likely to have a heart attack than those who have not had shingles.
WORLD
December 3, 2013 | By Tracy Wilkinson
MEXICO CITY -- Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, Mexico's fiery leftist leader, suffered a heart attack early Tuesday and was hospitalized in stable condition, doctors said. Lopez Obrador , a two-time presidential contender, former mayor of Mexico City and an increasingly contentious figure in Mexico's political scene, was “progressing satisfactorily,” Dr. Patricio Ortiz, a cardiologist, said in a brief news conference at the Medica Sur hospital. He will remain hospitalized for two to five days for recovery, Ortiz said.
SCIENCE
November 28, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
The massive earthquake that struck Japan on March 11, 2011, and the tsunami that followed caused nearly 16,000 confirmed deaths, and more than 2,600 people are still missing and presumed dead, according to the National Police Agency. A new report in the New England Journal of Medicine adds to the casualty toll by confirming an increase in heart attacks in the weeks following the magnitude 9.0 quake. Researchers from Osaka University, Tokyo Women's Medical University and Kyoto University Health Service gathered data on heart attacks in Fukushima, Iwate and Miyagi, the three prefectures most affected by the quake and tsunami that struck off the coast of Sendai.
SCIENCE
November 21, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
A study that culls health data for 1.8 million people over more than 57 years of research finds that controlling high blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose could halve the number of heart attacks attributable to being overweight or obese and pare the number of strokes linked to excess weight by 75%. In populations in which being overweight or obese are widespread, the new research offers a guide to which public health policies most effectively drive...
SCIENCE
November 18, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Some of the nation's most influential cardiologists are challenging new recommendations that would greatly expand the number of Americans taking a statin medication to reduce their chances of a heart attack or stroke. The guidelines issued last week by the American Heart Assn. and the American College of Cardiology were accompanied by a "risk calculator" that was supposed to identify patients whose odds of suffering either a stroke or a heart attack over the next 10 years were judged to be at least 7.5%.
NEWS
November 19, 2012 | By Jon Bardin
As if the lost income weren't enough, unemployment appears to increase the risk of heart attacks. According to a study published Monday in the journal Archives of Internal Medicine, people who were unemployed, had a history of unemployment, and even those who had short periods without work were all at a higher risk for heart attacks. Unemployment continues to be a major issue in the United States, with the national unemployment rate at 7.9%. And that leaves out many people who are underemployed or who have stopped looking for a job. Numerous studies have linked unemployment with health issues, most notably mental health.
SCIENCE
November 28, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
The massive earthquake that struck Japan on March 11, 2011, and the tsunami that followed caused nearly 16,000 confirmed deaths, and more than 2,600 people are still missing and presumed dead, according to the National Police Agency. A new report in the New England Journal of Medicine adds to the casualty toll by confirming an increase in heart attacks in the weeks following the magnitude 9.0 quake. Researchers from Osaka University, Tokyo Women's Medical University and Kyoto University Health Service gathered data on heart attacks in Fukushima, Iwate and Miyagi, the three prefectures most affected by the quake and tsunami that struck off the coast of Sendai.
SCIENCE
November 12, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Dramatically escalating the fight against heart attacks and strokes, the nation's cardiologists have rewritten the guidebook on how Americans should be treated with statins and unveiled a plan that could double the number of patients taking the cholesterol-lowering drugs to about 70 million. The new approach, presented Tuesday by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Assn., represents a stark shift from the way doctors have prescribed the popular drugs for most of the last decade.
SCIENCE
October 22, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Get a flu shot to ward off a case of influenza, and as an added bonus you'll reduce your risk of a heart attack, stroke or other type of unpleasant “cardiovascular event,” a new study finds. For some time, researchers have suspected that flu shots can protect heart health as well as respiratory health. They have tested this theory in a handful of clinical trials, and the results have been mixed. Now an international group of researchers has compiled data from a dozen randomized clinical trials to see if they could get a clearer answer to the question.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|