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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1985 | ARMANDO ACUNA, Times Staff Writer
A new study by researchers at the UC San Diego School of Medicine has found that people with atherosclerosis in their legs are 7 1/2 times more likely to die of cardiovascular diseases than people who don't have such fatty deposits in their legs. The results of the study, if confirmed by follow-up analysis, would give doctors yet another way of finding out whether their patients are in danger of suffering heart attacks and strokes.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 19, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
Alzheimer's disease and other dementias not only destroy the lives of those who suffer from them but take a devastating toll on family caregivers and on those who must pay the cost of care. An estimated 5 million people in the United States suffer from Alzheimer's. But that number will increase exponentially in the years ahead because of what Robin Barr, a senior official at the National Institute on Aging, calls "an aging tsunami. " A highly cited published research analysis estimates that the number of people with Alzheimer's around the world will jump from 36 million today to 115 million by 2050.
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NEWS
October 17, 1994 | From Associated Press
Cristoforo Pomaroli and Rosa Giovanelli had a son in 1780 in their small town in Italy, never knowing they bequeathed a genetic legacy that offers hope for reversing heart disease two centuries later. The boy's descendants in the northern Italian town of Limone inherited a genetic defect that protects them from the scourge of Western living--fatty deposits that clog the arteries.
SCIENCE
February 25, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
If you are taking vitamin supplements to reduce your risk of heart disease or cancer, a government panel of health experts wants you to know that you're probably wasting your money. In some cases, those vitamins may actually increase your risk of cancer. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force came to this conclusion Monday after reviewing dozens of studies, including many randomized clinical trials, considered the gold standard for medical research. The task force's final recommendation was published online Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
NEWS
October 13, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
Heart disease prevalence in the U.S. has declined over the last five years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday. The agency mined results from a large national telephone survey called the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to figure out how many people 18 years or older said they had coronary heart disease. The CDC researchers analyzed the data by age, sex, education, state and race/ethnicity and published their results in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Visibly aging but young at heart?  Don't count on it, suggested researchers Tuesday.  In a study following more than 10,000 people over 35 years, the presence of visible signs of aging signaled an increased risk of heart attack and heart disease. The research was presented at the American Heart Assn.'s Scientific Sessions in Los Angeles and was conducted in Denmark by University of Copenhagen biochemist Dr. Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen and colleagues. The team analyzed data collected from participants in a large study of heart disease, noting whether subjects developed heart disease and also whether they had any of six signs of aging: baldness at the crown of the head, receding hairline at the temples, gray hair, wrinkles, earlobe crease and fatty deposits around the eyelids.
NEWS
October 6, 2010
Years spent in a noisy workplace may take a toll on both hearing and heart health. A study published Wednesday found that persistent noise in the workplace doubled the chances of an employee developing serious heart disease. Previous studies that have looked at the effect of loud noise on the heart have produced mixed results. For the new study, researchers examined a database of more than 6,000 employees ages 20 and older who were surveyed about lifestyle, occupation and health.
NEWS
September 7, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
After menopause, women are expected to experience a sharply increased risk of heart disease. The traditional thinking has been that hormones protect women from heart disease until menopause. But a new study turns that theory on its head. A study published Tuesday in the British Medical Journal suggests instead that heart disease death rates in women progress in an orderly rate as women age and are unlikely to be greatly influenced by hormones. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine looked at death statistics from people in England, Wales and the United States born from 1916 to 1945.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Monte Morin
More than half of all men and women over the age of 45 will develop heart disease in their lifetime, according to a new health risk analysis.  The study, published online Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., is the first of its kind to calculate the lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease for specific age groups. Among other conclusions, study authors found that even adults with optimal heart health face a 30% chance of developing heart disease. "To date, there have been no published data on lifetime risk," wrote Dr. John T. Wilkins and colleagues.
NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Heart disease is a killer, and now researchers  say staying late at work could be one contributing factor. But here’s a note to the water-cooler crowd: It’s not just the workaholics who get heart attacks.  One in four  deaths in the U.S. are due to heart disease. Most of those deaths are from coronary heart disease , in which fatty material clogs arteries that deliver blood and oxygen to the heart. Some big risk factors, such as age and family history, can’t be changed.  But you can lower your risk—even at the office—with some lifestyle changes.
SCIENCE
January 29, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Men over 65, as well as younger men with diagnosed heart disease, were at least twice as likely to have non-fatal heart attacks in the 90 days after they were prescribed testosterone medication than were men of the same age and health status who did not get the hormone supplement, a study has found. For men under 65 with no diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, testosterone supplementation did not appear to raise heart attack risk, the study suggests. But among men older than 65, many of whom may have had undiagnosed risk factors, rates of non-fatal heart attack rose as much as threefold in the 90 days after they filled a prescription for testosterone medication.
SCIENCE
December 18, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Experts are urging doctors to ease up on using medications to control blood pressure in older patients. Rather than aim for a target blood pressure of 140/90 mm Hg, the target will be relaxed slightly to 150/90 mm Hg, according to new guidelines issued Wednesday. The authors of the new guidelines , published in the Journal of the American Medical Assn., emphasized that they were not changing the definition of high blood pressure. Rather, they are recognizing that data from randomized clinical trials do not show that using drugs to nudge down systolic blood pressure from 150 to 140 provides any health benefit.
NEWS
December 17, 2013 | By Chris Erskine
Traveling keeps you young. Or at least healthier. That's the finding of a new study linking travel to decreased risks of heart attack and depression and even the promotion of brain health.  The Global Commission on Aging and Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, in partnership with the U.S. Travel Assn., has released research that shows travel offers the same sort of physical and cognitive benefits as crossword puzzles or museum visits....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Los Angeles County's mortality rate dropped 19% between 2001 and 2010, according to a new report from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. Data compiled for the report , which was released Monday, showed that death rates due to coronary heart disease fell 37% over that decade. Death rates due to stroke fell 35%. One ailment that bucked the trend was Alzheimer's disease, which saw death rates double, a sign of the aging population as well as increased awareness of the condition, the report noted.
SCIENCE
November 21, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
A study that culls health data for 1.8 million people over more than 57 years of research finds that controlling high blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose could halve the number of heart attacks attributable to being overweight or obese and pare the number of strokes linked to excess weight by 75%. In populations in which being overweight or obese are widespread, the new research offers a guide to which public health policies most effectively drive...
OPINION
November 19, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
According to two respected medical organizations, up to twice as many of us - nearly a third of all adults - should be taking statins to avoid heart attack and stroke. But statins, the potent cholesterol-lowering medications of which Lipitor is the most famous brand name, also are associated with some difficult side effects, including most notably muscle pain. And once prescribed, they are generally taken for the rest of one's life. Last week, the American Heart Assn. and the American College of Cardiology concluded that the drug should be prescribed for people with at least a 7.5% chance of having a heart attack within the next decade, a lower threshold than before.
NEWS
November 14, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Stress takes a toll on women's heart health. A study released Sunday found that women who report high stress on the job have a 40% increased risk of being diagnosed with heart disease. Researchers at Brigham & Women's Hospital in Boston looked at survey data from 17,415 women who were part of the Women's Health Study. These women were primarily white health professionals in their 50s. They were followed for more than 10 years. Job stress was defined as having a demanding job but little or no decision-making authority or opportunities to use one's creative or individual skills.
NEWS
September 15, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Healthy women who go through menopause naturally may lower their risk of heart disease if they take hormone therapy in the early years of menopause, according to a new study.   The research is the latest contribution to the longstanding controversy on the merits of hormone therapy after menopause. Previous studies show that hormone therapy in women who are 10 or more years past menopause raises the risk of cardiovascular problems. However, the question of whether hormone therapy may prevent or slow the development of heart disease in younger menopausal women has been a subject of continued debate.
SCIENCE
November 18, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Less than a week after the American Heart Assn. and the nation's cardiologists issued guidelines that would greatly expand the number of Americans taking a statin medication, the guidelines have been faulted for overestimating patients' risk of heart attack or stroke. Few authors of the new recommendations had even returned to their clinical practices before learning that an influential Harvard cardiologist and his biostatistician collaborator had taken the guidelines to task, arguing they use unreliable data on Americans' health to calculate which patients would benefit from taking the medication.
NEWS
November 14, 2013 | By Karin Klein
Adding to Americans' confusion about the ever-changing news from the medical world, there's a new recommendation that would, in effect, drastically increase the number of people who take statins in an effort to reduce their risk of heart attack and stroke. Statins are potent prescription medications with numerous side effects, including memory loss. The criteria for taking the statins, under the guidelines released by the American Heart Assn. and the American College of Cardiology (a professional organization, not an actual college)
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