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NEWS
October 6, 2010
Years spent in a noisy workplace may take a toll on both hearing and heart health. A study published Wednesday found that persistent noise in the workplace doubled the chances of an employee developing serious heart disease. Previous studies that have looked at the effect of loud noise on the heart have produced mixed results. For the new study, researchers examined a database of more than 6,000 employees ages 20 and older who were surveyed about lifestyle, occupation and health.
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NEWS
November 13, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Two or more sugar-sweetened drinks a day have been associated with a larger waist and a higher risk of heart disease in adult women, according to research released Sunday. Women ages 45 to 84 who drank at least two sugar-sweetened drinks a day -- such as soda or flavored waters with added sugar -- were nearly four times as likely to develop high triglycerides as women who drank one or fewer of those beverages. Two or more sugar-sweetened drinks a day also were linked to bigger waist size and a higher risk for Type 2 diabetes.
NEWS
November 22, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Americans' salt intake is a major issue among health experts, with controversy lingering over how much salt is too much. A new study suggests that clarification on this question is sorely needed, especially for people with existing heart disease. The study looked at sodium excretion in the urine -- which is a measure for sodium intake in one's diet -- of 28,800 adults who were at high risk for heart disease or diabetes or who had heart disease. Sodium and potassium excretion were measured for 24 hours, which was an advantage in this study compared to others that have tried to determine the impact of dietary salt on health.
NEWS
April 5, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Heart disease is a killer, and now researchers  say staying late at work could be one contributing factor. But here’s a note to the water-cooler crowd: It’s not just the workaholics who get heart attacks.  One in four  deaths in the U.S. are due to heart disease. Most of those deaths are from coronary heart disease , in which fatty material clogs arteries that deliver blood and oxygen to the heart. Some big risk factors, such as age and family history, can’t be changed.  But you can lower your risk—even at the office—with some lifestyle changes.
NEWS
March 8, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
The Mediterranean diet has had many fans over the years, even in the scientific community. A new analysis of 50 studies involving half a million participants reinforces what many healthcare professionals already have said about the diet: It helps lower the risk of heart disease and diabetes. The analysis published online Monday in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology examined how the diet affects metabolic syndrome, that is, disorders that increase the risk of heart disease.
NEWS
September 15, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Healthy women who go through menopause naturally may lower their risk of heart disease if they take hormone therapy in the early years of menopause, according to a new study.   The research is the latest contribution to the longstanding controversy on the merits of hormone therapy after menopause. Previous studies show that hormone therapy in women who are 10 or more years past menopause raises the risk of cardiovascular problems. However, the question of whether hormone therapy may prevent or slow the development of heart disease in younger menopausal women has been a subject of continued debate.
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Visibly aging but young at heart?  Don't count on it, suggested researchers Tuesday.  In a study following more than 10,000 people over 35 years, the presence of visible signs of aging signaled an increased risk of heart attack and heart disease. The research was presented at the American Heart Assn.'s Scientific Sessions in Los Angeles and was conducted in Denmark by University of Copenhagen biochemist Dr. Anne Tybjaerg-Hansen and colleagues. The team analyzed data collected from participants in a large study of heart disease, noting whether subjects developed heart disease and also whether they had any of six signs of aging: baldness at the crown of the head, receding hairline at the temples, gray hair, wrinkles, earlobe crease and fatty deposits around the eyelids.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The Los Angeles County Coroner's office reported Thursday that singer Whitney Houston's death at the Beverly Hills Hotel was an accidental drowning.  Cocaine use and heart disease were contributing factors in her death, officials said Thursday. “She may have had a heart attack” that rendered her unconscious, leading to her drowning, said Ed Winter , deputy chief of coroner investigations. Cocaine's negative effects on cardiac health are well-established.
NEWS
January 18, 1989 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
The harbingers of adult heart disease can be detected in early childhood, according to a prominent heart disease researcher who called Tuesday for routine cholesterol and blood pressure screening for all children upon entering school or sooner. Dr. Gerald Berenson, chief of cardiology at Louisiana State University Medical Center and head of an ongoing, 15-year study of 10,000 children and young adults in Bogalusa, La.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The first-ever city by city breakdown of deaths from heart disease and stroke in California shows that residents of Los Angeles suburbs have the highest heart disease risk, while those in the San Francisco Bay Area and the coast of San Diego County have the lowest. Although deaths from cardiovascular diseases in California have declined almost 50% since 1972, an estimated 87,000 people die from them each year.
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