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NEWS
November 14, 2010 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Stress takes a toll on women's heart health. A study released Sunday found that women who report high stress on the job have a 40% increased risk of being diagnosed with heart disease. Researchers at Brigham & Women's Hospital in Boston looked at survey data from 17,415 women who were part of the Women's Health Study. These women were primarily white health professionals in their 50s. They were followed for more than 10 years. Job stress was defined as having a demanding job but little or no decision-making authority or opportunities to use one's creative or individual skills.
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NEWS
September 15, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Healthy women who go through menopause naturally may lower their risk of heart disease if they take hormone therapy in the early years of menopause, according to a new study.   The research is the latest contribution to the longstanding controversy on the merits of hormone therapy after menopause. Previous studies show that hormone therapy in women who are 10 or more years past menopause raises the risk of cardiovascular problems. However, the question of whether hormone therapy may prevent or slow the development of heart disease in younger menopausal women has been a subject of continued debate.
NEWS
September 7, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
After menopause, women are expected to experience a sharply increased risk of heart disease. The traditional thinking has been that hormones protect women from heart disease until menopause. But a new study turns that theory on its head. A study published Tuesday in the British Medical Journal suggests instead that heart disease death rates in women progress in an orderly rate as women age and are unlikely to be greatly influenced by hormones. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine looked at death statistics from people in England, Wales and the United States born from 1916 to 1945.
NEWS
November 22, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Americans' salt intake is a major issue among health experts, with controversy lingering over how much salt is too much. A new study suggests that clarification on this question is sorely needed, especially for people with existing heart disease. The study looked at sodium excretion in the urine -- which is a measure for sodium intake in one's diet -- of 28,800 adults who were at high risk for heart disease or diabetes or who had heart disease. Sodium and potassium excretion were measured for 24 hours, which was an advantage in this study compared to others that have tried to determine the impact of dietary salt on health.
NEWS
March 8, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
The Mediterranean diet has had many fans over the years, even in the scientific community. A new analysis of 50 studies involving half a million participants reinforces what many healthcare professionals already have said about the diet: It helps lower the risk of heart disease and diabetes. The analysis published online Monday in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology examined how the diet affects metabolic syndrome, that is, disorders that increase the risk of heart disease.
NEWS
March 22, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
The Los Angeles County Coroner's office reported Thursday that singer Whitney Houston's death at the Beverly Hills Hotel was an accidental drowning.  Cocaine use and heart disease were contributing factors in her death, officials said Thursday. “She may have had a heart attack” that rendered her unconscious, leading to her drowning, said Ed Winter , deputy chief of coroner investigations. Cocaine's negative effects on cardiac health are well-established.
NEWS
January 14, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Younger women who ate at least three servings per week of strawberries or blueberries reduced their likelihood of suffering a heart attack by one-third compared with their sisters who incorporated fewer of the colorful berries into their diet, a new study says. The berry benefit was sufficiently strong that it held even after researchers adjusted for age, high blood pressure, family history of heart attack, body-mass index, exercise, smoking, and caffeine or alcohol intake. Researchers suggested that a group of dietary flavenoids called anthocyanins, which give blueberries and strawberries their jewel-like colors, may be responsible for the health benefits seen in the study's large sample of subjects.
NEWS
January 18, 1989 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
The harbingers of adult heart disease can be detected in early childhood, according to a prominent heart disease researcher who called Tuesday for routine cholesterol and blood pressure screening for all children upon entering school or sooner. Dr. Gerald Berenson, chief of cardiology at Louisiana State University Medical Center and head of an ongoing, 15-year study of 10,000 children and young adults in Bogalusa, La.
NEWS
October 9, 1996 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The first-ever city by city breakdown of deaths from heart disease and stroke in California shows that residents of Los Angeles suburbs have the highest heart disease risk, while those in the San Francisco Bay Area and the coast of San Diego County have the lowest. Although deaths from cardiovascular diseases in California have declined almost 50% since 1972, an estimated 87,000 people die from them each year.
NEWS
August 23, 1988
Rene Bine Jr., 73, a heart disease specialist who was one of the first physicians to enter Dachau concentration camp after its liberation by Allied troops in World War II. The San Francisco native, who earned his bachelor's and medical degrees at Stanford University, served as a captain in the Army Medical Corps in Europe and North Africa during the war. He was an expert in nutrition and its relation to heart disease and wrote numerous articles and pamphlets on cardiovascular topics.
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