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Heart Mountain Relocation Center

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NATIONAL
August 21, 2011 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
When they first came to this corner of Wyoming 69 years ago, shops and restaurants in the tiny town of Cody hung banners warning "No Japs Allowed. " A local newspaper announced their arrival with the headline, "TEN THOUSAND JAPS TO BE INTERNED HERE. " But this weekend, as hundreds of Japanese Americans interned during World War II at the Heart Mountain Relocation Center returned, many for the first time, new signs greeted them: "Welcome all Japanese Americans. Congratulations. " Photos: Heart Mountain reunion They returned to see the land, now fields of lima beans and alfalfa, and to see the opening of a long-awaited museum at the site that will preserve their stories.
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TRAVEL
March 31, 2013 | By Diana Lambdin Meyer
CODY, Wyo. - The drive east of Cody is through high desert, and the February weekend of my visit was bitterly cold. But I was wearing a heavy down coat, snow pants and boots, and riding in a cozy, warm SUV. That's not how nearly 14,000 earlier visitors had arrived in Cody. They came by train from California in late August, and they weren't wearing down or fleece, nor did they have a comfy hotel room awaiting them. They were among the 100,000 Japanese Americans relocated from the West Coast to the interior of the U.S. at the beginning of World War II, shortly after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor.
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TRAVEL
March 31, 2013 | By Diana Lambdin Meyer
CODY, Wyo. - The drive east of Cody is through high desert, and the February weekend of my visit was bitterly cold. But I was wearing a heavy down coat, snow pants and boots, and riding in a cozy, warm SUV. That's not how nearly 14,000 earlier visitors had arrived in Cody. They came by train from California in late August, and they weren't wearing down or fleece, nor did they have a comfy hotel room awaiting them. They were among the 100,000 Japanese Americans relocated from the West Coast to the interior of the U.S. at the beginning of World War II, shortly after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor.
NATIONAL
August 21, 2011 | By Esmeralda Bermudez, Los Angeles Times
When they first came to this corner of Wyoming 69 years ago, shops and restaurants in the tiny town of Cody hung banners warning "No Japs Allowed. " A local newspaper announced their arrival with the headline, "TEN THOUSAND JAPS TO BE INTERNED HERE. " But this weekend, as hundreds of Japanese Americans interned during World War II at the Heart Mountain Relocation Center returned, many for the first time, new signs greeted them: "Welcome all Japanese Americans. Congratulations. " Photos: Heart Mountain reunion They returned to see the land, now fields of lima beans and alfalfa, and to see the opening of a long-awaited museum at the site that will preserve their stories.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1992 | IRENE CHANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A flood of emotion poured over Bacon Sakatani as he wandered into the wooden barracks, one of hundreds that had housed him and 10,700 other Japanese-Americans at Wyoming's Heart Mountain Relocation Center during World War II. "This room is powerful," he said during a September visit to Heart Mountain, documenting his reactions on a tape recorder. "You just look around and it really brings back memories of what we went through.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2004 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of Japanese Americans who had been held in World War II internment camps gathered here Saturday for the first public look at an interpretive center that tells the bitter story of their imprisonment with stark pictures and blunt words. The sign at the entrance of the new National Park Service museum sets the tone: "In 1942, the U.S. Government ordered more than 110,000 men, women and children to leave their homes and detained them in remote military-style camps." Manzanar, a square-mile plot sandwiched between the Sierra Nevada and the Inyo Mountains, is the only one of the 10 relocation camps across the county to have such an exhibit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 2007 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Violet Kazue de Cristoforo, a California poet and scholar who wrote, collected and translated haiku that compressed into a few lines the heartaches and realities of the detention camps where thousands of Japanese Americans were incarcerated during World War II, died Wednesday at her home in Salinas. She was 90. De Cristoforo died two weeks after returning from Washington, D.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Emiko Omori's "Rabbit in the Moon" is arguably the most comprehensive and illuminating documentary yet on the internment of Japanese Americans in the wake of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. It takes its curious title from a Japanese tradition that envisions the lunar landscape as a rabbit pounding sweet rice. Omori's older sister (and co-producer) Chizuko, who is the film's key figure, further explains that when she sees a full moon she sees a smiling man. She likens the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 2007 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Dr. Mitsuo Inouye, a Culver City physician who helped bring teams of Japanese medical experts to the United States to examine and treat American survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb blasts, has died. He was 82. Inouye died Dec. 15 of complications from renal failure at the Culver West Convalescent Hospital in Culver City, said his son, Jon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2004 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of Japanese Americans who had been held in World War II internment camps gathered here Saturday for the first public look at an interpretive center that tells the bitter story of their imprisonment with stark pictures and blunt words. The sign at the entrance of the new National Park Service museum sets the tone: "In 1942, the U.S. Government ordered more than 110,000 men, women and children to leave their homes and detained them in remote military-style camps." Manzanar, a square-mile plot sandwiched between the Sierra Nevada and the Inyo Mountains, is the only one of the 10 relocation camps across the county to have such an exhibit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1992 | IRENE CHANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A flood of emotion poured over Bacon Sakatani as he wandered into the wooden barracks, one of hundreds that had housed him and 10,700 other Japanese-Americans at Wyoming's Heart Mountain Relocation Center during World War II. "This room is powerful," he said during a September visit to Heart Mountain, documenting his reactions on a tape recorder. "You just look around and it really brings back memories of what we went through.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2008 | Christopher Knight, Times Staff Writer
Between 1900 and 1930, Los Angeles built the foundations of its singular metropolitan identity. The construction of a deep-water port, a regional transportation network and an aqueduct to bring water to the semi-arid desert laid the groundwork for a rapid, quarter-century transformation. L.A. went from small town to the nation's largest municipal territory. Fueled by a torrent of more than 1 million new residents, most from the Midwest, the city became, in H.L.
NATIONAL
September 5, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
CASPER, Wyo. - One man describes finding salvation by adopting a small bird during his years in a World War II internment camp. A former highway patrolman explains his friendship with the felon who shot and nearly killed him 30 years ago. And a veteran ranch couple discuss their early years on the American prairie. The disparate stories share a single thread: They all take place in Wyoming. An effort to collect the oral histories of ordinary residents - from longtime natives to unlikely foreign transplants - is being launched in this wide-open Western state, showing that although the landscape may be flat, the depth of life and experience here is decidedly multidimensional.
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