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Heart Pacemakers

BUSINESS
October 1, 1991
Siemens-Pacesetter, a Sylmar-based heart pacemaker company, said it plans to appeal a decision by a federal court in Illinois that it has infringed on a patent held by its chief competitor, Medtronic Inc. of Minneapolis. The court found last week that Siemens-Pacesetter, a unit of German electronics concern Siemens AG, had infringed on a Medtronic patent for a technology that uses signals from the body to control the rate of pacesetters.
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NEWS
September 8, 1991 | From Associated Press
Retiring Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall was "resting comfortably and in good spirits" Saturday after surgery to implant a pacemaker, a spokesman for the National Naval Medical Center said. "The pacemaker is functioning as expected," hospital spokesman Lt. Cmdr. Bill Clyde said in a written statement announcing the surgery. The device was implanted Friday afternoon "to treat an abnormally slow heart rate," Clyde said.
SPORTS
October 15, 1990
Forward Joe Rhett, who had a pacemaker implanted in February after doctors detected an irregular heartbeat, will be cleared to play basketball this season but probably not in time for today's opening practice, South Carolina athletic director King Dixon said. Rhett, a 6-foot-8 junior who averaged 10.6 points and 7.9 rebounds, was given medical clearance to play last month. But his return has been delayed by questions over legal responsibility for his on-court welfare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1990 | ERIK HAMILTON
At 14 years old, Nicky is no spring chicken. And so it was not surprising that the Australian shepherd was having heart problems. On Wednesday night, however, Nicky's heart became particularly agitated and her owner, William Hipp, took Nicky to a Garden Grove animal emergency hospital. There, the veterinarian on duty thought the dog should be seen by a specialist. After conducting a series of ultrasound tests, the specialist determined that Nicky needed a pacemaker if she was to survive.
NEWS
March 18, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Skippy, a 7-year-old red kangaroo from the San Francisco Zoo that received a pacemaker during a first-of-its-kind operation earlier this month, has died. Zoo officials said the animal died Wednesday at UC Davis Veterinary Hospital, where she had been transferred after the March 5 surgery. A team of cardiologists led by Dr. John Langbert of the UC San Francisco Medical School performed the operation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1990
The $3 million spent by the U.S. government to aid the Chamorro election in Nicaragua was merely a down payment, we hear. As was the amount spent to unseat Noriega in Panama. A few hundred mil for Nicaragua, a few for Panama, some for Poland, Hungary, Czechoslovakia. Now we know where to mail that peace dividend. HARRY SIMMONS Laguna Niguel
BUSINESS
October 31, 1989 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In mid-August, Siemens-Pacesetter Inc., a Sylmar manufacturer of heart pacemakers, got federal approval to start selling its latest pacemaker, the Synchrony. The device, which costs doctors $6,300, is the most sophisticated and expensive pacemaker Siemens-Pacesetter has yet designed. Chairman Alfred E. Mann believes that Synchrony will enable his company, the industry's No. 2 player with about 25% of the $1.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | Associated Press
Four former Cordis Corp. officials were found innocent in federal court Friday of selling defective heart pacemakers between 1983 and 1985. All have left the Miami-based company, which has since sold off its pacemaker division. Cordis itself had pleaded guilty previously and paid a $764,000 fine, along with $5 million in civil penalties, to various federal agencies.
NEWS
September 20, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Doctors treating Mother Teresa described her condition Tuesday as "serious but not critical," adding that the 79-year-old Nobel Peace Prize winner is likely to remain in the hospital for "a minimum of four to six weeks." The fever that posed an imminent threat to Mother Teresa's life last week has finally gone, the doctors said, but her heart remains erratic and the internationally acclaimed Roman Catholic nun continues to have chest pains. "It's an old heart," declared Dr.
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