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Heart Pacemakers

BUSINESS
January 13, 1995 | Times Wire Services
A faulty heart pacemaker wire has been blamed for two deaths, prompting a meeting between federal regulators and the manufacturer concerning 40,500 people worldwide who have the device in their chests. Food and Drug Administration officials and executives from Telectronics Pacing Systems Inc. in Englewood, Colo., will try to determine whether surgery would be more risky than leaving the devices intact. "We're concerned," Bruce Burlington of the FDA said Thursday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1993 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many brothers spend their teen-age years at one another's throats, but not 16-year-old Dustin Petok and his 19-year-old sibling, Josh. They enjoy each other's company, make home movies together and often team up to play jazz, Dustin on piano and Josh on guitar. There is something else unusual about the San Fernando Valley residents: Both have pacemakers. In fact, the Petoks may be the only teen-age brothers in the United States who have the heart-stimulation devices.
NEWS
March 19, 1993 | ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary Les Aspin received a pacemaker implant Thursday to prevent further deterioration of his heart. His physicians declared the operation a success and said he probably would be back at work early next week. The relatively simple 90-minute procedure was performed using a local anesthetic and a mild sedative. Aspin, 54, was fully conscious as the silver-dollar-sized device was implanted just below his collarbone, with twin wires leading to his heart.
BUSINESS
February 16, 1993 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the pacemaker business, there are two main providers to the U.S. market: industry leader Medtronic Inc. in Minneapolis, followed by Siemens Pacesetter Inc. in Sylmar. Together, they supply roughly 70% of the conventional pacemakers that bolster otherwise slow heartbeats. Now Medtronic is getting lots of attention for its new device that does something different--it calms fast heartbeats.
NEWS
October 24, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The federal government warned Friday that faulty parts on some types of cardiac pacemakers could cause the devices to fail and urged doctors to closely monitor patients who have the implants. Troublesome "leads" on some of the pacemakers in question have lead to a failure rate of up to 8% from three to seven years after implantation, according to a report prepared by the General Accounting Office and released by Rep. Henry A.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1991
Siemens-Pacesetter, a Sylmar-based heart pacemaker company, said it plans to appeal a decision by a federal court in Illinois that it has infringed on a patent held by its chief competitor, Medtronic Inc. of Minneapolis. The court found last week that Siemens-Pacesetter, a unit of German electronics concern Siemens AG, had infringed on a Medtronic patent for a technology that uses signals from the body to control the rate of pacesetters.
NEWS
September 8, 1991 | From Associated Press
Retiring Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall was "resting comfortably and in good spirits" Saturday after surgery to implant a pacemaker, a spokesman for the National Naval Medical Center said. "The pacemaker is functioning as expected," hospital spokesman Lt. Cmdr. Bill Clyde said in a written statement announcing the surgery. The device was implanted Friday afternoon "to treat an abnormally slow heart rate," Clyde said.
SPORTS
October 15, 1990
Forward Joe Rhett, who had a pacemaker implanted in February after doctors detected an irregular heartbeat, will be cleared to play basketball this season but probably not in time for today's opening practice, South Carolina athletic director King Dixon said. Rhett, a 6-foot-8 junior who averaged 10.6 points and 7.9 rebounds, was given medical clearance to play last month. But his return has been delayed by questions over legal responsibility for his on-court welfare.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1990 | ERIK HAMILTON
At 14 years old, Nicky is no spring chicken. And so it was not surprising that the Australian shepherd was having heart problems. On Wednesday night, however, Nicky's heart became particularly agitated and her owner, William Hipp, took Nicky to a Garden Grove animal emergency hospital. There, the veterinarian on duty thought the dog should be seen by a specialist. After conducting a series of ultrasound tests, the specialist determined that Nicky needed a pacemaker if she was to survive.
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