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BUSINESS
May 3, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn, This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details
Are you addicted to checking your work email? Do you check it first thing in the morning and right before you go to bed? Do you check it on work breaks and even on vacations?  Well, here's a piece of advice: Stop. According to a new study by researchers at UC Irvine , people who check their work email regularly exhibit higher states of stress, and less focus, than workers who continue to do their jobs while being cut off from email entirely. The study examined the heart rate of workers at a suburban office outside of Boston.
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HEALTH
April 11, 2011 | By Roy M. Wallack, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When the music starts up in the Zumba dance class at Big Bear's Mountain Fitness Center gym, everyone is on their feet — except for Pam Newman. She's the 300-plus-pound woman in the back of the room who's lost 100 pounds in the last year by violating the "standing to exercise" rule. That's because she enthusiastically kicks her legs and flails her arms … while sitting down on a bench. Newman, the director of a local preschool and a grandmother of five, can't stand up and dance — yet. A year ago she weighed 440 pounds; for seven years, she barely moved, walking only from her door to the car on crutches.
HEALTH
July 4, 2005 | Roy M. Wallack
Some personal trainers say that obtaining biofeedback is the best way to get the most out of your cardio training. Consisting of a chest strap that uses electrodes to detect your heart rate and a wristwatch readout that displays it as beats per minute, a heart rate monitor encourages you to stay in a heart rate target zone that is challenging enough to increase your fitness, but easy enough to avoid injury or exhaustion.
HEALTH
February 12, 2007 | Jeannine Stein, Times Staff Writer
Giusy Mele-Brown is no slouch when it comes to exercise -- she clocks in about two hours of workouts most days. But in the last six years she had seen her weight steadily climb. She eventually gained 25 pounds.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Exercising 15 minutes a day provides health benefits, a study finds , good news to those who are always strapped for time. The study, which appeared in the journal the Lancet this week, found that doing 15 minutes of leisure time physical activity was linked with an average three added years of life expectancy, along with a 10% decrease in cancer mortality and a 20% drop in cardiovascular disease, compared with sedentary people. So now that we have the good news, just what can you do in 15 minutes?
NEWS
December 28, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
As you reach for another snickerdoodle you're probably thinking about taking off all the weight you gained over the holidays. Maybe you're contemplating buying a piece of exercise equipment to use at home. Consumer Reports is here to help by rating the top home-use treadmills and ellipticals as well as pedometers, all in different price ranges. The Precor 9.31 is the top-rated non-folding treadmill, and also a pricey one at $4,000. At the number two spot is the Landice L7 Cardio Trainer at $3,800 and in third place is the True PS300 at $2,400.
SCIENCE
December 3, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
This is your heart on an energy drink, and it's contracting significantly faster than it was before you opened that can full of liquid stimulant. So says a team of cardiac radiologists who were concerned about adverse side effects from energy drinks, especially on heart function. Energy drinks like Red Bull, Monster, 5-Hour Energy and Rockstar are involved in tens of thousands of emergency room visits each year. In the U.S. alone, nearly 21,000 people went to E.R.s after consuming energy drinks in 2011, according to a 2013 report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.
HEALTH
September 24, 2007
These Web-only Health offerings can be found at latimes.com/health: ASK US Our reporters answer readers' health questions. Today's query: When engaging in the most strenuous portion of my cardio workout, my heart rate routinely gets up to around 95% of the maximum heart rate calculated for my age. I am going by the standard formula or chart that's on the cardio machine. I don't feel winded and can sustain that rate for some time. Should I be concerned?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
HEART RATE HITS: Aerobicists' 10 Most Popular Workout Songs 1. "I Saw Him Standing There," Tiffany (increases average heart rate to 161 beats per minute) 2. "Wild, Wild West," The Escape Club (140 b/m) 3. "The Way You Make Me Feel," Michael Jackson (112 b/m) 4. "Pink Cadillac," Natalie Cole (125 b/m) 5. "Get Outta My Dreams," Billy Ocean (118 b/m) 6. "The Loco-motion," Kylie Minogue (130 b/m) 7. "Underneath the Radar," Underworld (146 b/m) 8. "Just Got Paid," Johnny Kemp (117 b/m) 9.
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