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SCIENCE
February 7, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Hugh Laurie only plays a doctor on TV, but he has a following among physicians in Germany who are crediting his fictional Dr. House with helping them diagnose a man with a life-threatening case of cobalt intoxication. The 55-year-old patient was referred to their clinic in Marburg in May 2012 suffering from severe heart failure. An echocardiogram revealed that his ejection fraction - a measure of how well his heart was pumping blood - was only about 25%. (In a healthy person, it's between 55% and 70%, according to the Cleveland Clinic .)
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HEALTH
July 4, 2005 | Roy M. Wallack
Some personal trainers say that obtaining biofeedback is the best way to get the most out of your cardio training. Consisting of a chest strap that uses electrodes to detect your heart rate and a wristwatch readout that displays it as beats per minute, a heart rate monitor encourages you to stay in a heart rate target zone that is challenging enough to increase your fitness, but easy enough to avoid injury or exhaustion.
HEALTH
September 1, 2012 | Melinda Fulmer
Take your weight routine to the next level with this high-intensity cardio drill. The Russian dance is a favorite of personal trainer and group fitness instructor Amy Dixon, who uses it on her latest high-intensity interval training video, "Breathless Body Volume 2: The Edge. " Sandwich this drill between weight-bearing exercises to create a circuit that packs in a cardio and strength workout at the same time. -- What it does This move gets your heart rate up quickly, allowing you to burn a lot of calories while challenging your leg muscles.
HEALTH
April 11, 2011 | Roy Wallack, Gear
Larry Brooks had been a football player through high school and college and was athletic well into adulthood — in fact, he was a power lifter into his mid-40s. But by the time he hit his mid-50s, a busy decade of all work, no exercise and drinking as many as 35 cups of coffee each day took its toll. In December 2009, after a bout of pneumonia, the geologist from Keller, Texas, found himself with a 54-inch waist, 40.3% body fat, total cholesterol of 325 and a $300 monthly bill for Lipitor, three beta blockers and other drugs.
NEWS
September 21, 2012 | By Maeve Reston
Mitt Romney's physician described the Republican presidential nominee as an “energetic, strong, physically fit” and vigorous man in a letter released Friday offering the first detailed glimpse into the state of his health. Dr. Randall D. Gaz, who practices at Massachusetts General Hospital and has been Romney's personal physician since 1989, said the former Massachusetts governor has “no physical impairments that should interfere with his rigorous and demanding political career as the next president of the United States.”  “He has shown the ability to be engaged in multiple, varied, simultaneous activities requiring complex mental, social, emotional, and leadership skills,” Gaz wrote in the letter released on Romney's website.
HEALTH
September 29, 2012 | Roy Wallack, Gear
When the weather cools off (we hope) this fall, the active man and woman will hit the trail. Whether you hike, bike, run or bird-watch, carry a giant backpack or a pocket-sized water bottle, push your heart rate to the limit or barely break a sweat, the items below will add to the fun - helping to speed you along, keep you on track, record the adventure and get you home safer and sounder. Smart head light Petzl NAO: Patented, self-adjusting headlamp for all-night marathoners, mountaineers and rock climbers that automatically alters light output based on how far you are from an object, theoretically maximizing safety and battery life.
SCIENCE
December 3, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
This is your heart on an energy drink, and it's contracting significantly faster than it was before you opened that can full of liquid stimulant. So says a team of cardiac radiologists who were concerned about adverse side effects from energy drinks, especially on heart function. Energy drinks like Red Bull, Monster, 5-Hour Energy and Rockstar are involved in tens of thousands of emergency room visits each year. In the U.S. alone, nearly 21,000 people went to E.R.s after consuming energy drinks in 2011, according to a 2013 report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration.
HEALTH
May 11, 1998 | CANDACE A. WEDLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dibs on the TV set Wednesday night. The Nanny--Fran Drescher--and Mr. Sheffield--Charles Shaughnessy--are getting married on "The Nanny" (CBS). We've waited nearly six years for this wedding. Come 8 p.m., Poco (the cat) and I will be celebrating the hourlong show in fine viewer fashion: We'll unplug the phone, call a truce on the remote control, set two pillows and two bowls of popcorn on the floor--and none of that low-fat business, either.
HEALTH
September 24, 2007
These Web-only Health offerings can be found at latimes.com/health: ASK US Our reporters answer readers' health questions. Today's query: When engaging in the most strenuous portion of my cardio workout, my heart rate routinely gets up to around 95% of the maximum heart rate calculated for my age. I am going by the standard formula or chart that's on the cardio machine. I don't feel winded and can sustain that rate for some time. Should I be concerned?
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