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Heart Rate

HEALTH
January 4, 2010 | By Karen Ravn
Whether you're trudging on a treadmill, pedaling on an exercise bike or taking on Roger Federer in a Wii game of Grand Slam Tennis, the machine will probably give you a reading of how many calories are going up in sweat. In fact, no matter what you're doing -- and that includes doing nothing -- you can find a gadget to compute how many calories you're working off. But should you put a lot of weight on these figures? "The short answer is no," says Dr. Chris Cooper, director of the UCLA exercise physiology research laboratory.
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HEALTH
December 29, 2012 | By Melinda Fulmer
Cardio doesn't have to be deadly dull and serious. In this fun animal-inspired exercise, you'll get your heart rate up, build muscle and you might even crack a smile. Called the lateral traveling ape, this move is part of the new "Animal Flow Workout" that body weight fitness pro Mike Fitch developed for Equinox gyms. What it does It's great for entire body conditioning, as it works muscles in the arms, shoulders and legs at the same time it's elevating your heart rate and torching calories.
HEALTH
September 24, 2007
These Web-only Health offerings can be found at latimes.com/health: ASK US Our reporters answer readers' health questions. Today's query: When engaging in the most strenuous portion of my cardio workout, my heart rate routinely gets up to around 95% of the maximum heart rate calculated for my age. I am going by the standard formula or chart that's on the cardio machine. I don't feel winded and can sustain that rate for some time. Should I be concerned?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
HEART RATE HITS: Aerobicists' 10 Most Popular Workout Songs 1. "I Saw Him Standing There," Tiffany (increases average heart rate to 161 beats per minute) 2. "Wild, Wild West," The Escape Club (140 b/m) 3. "The Way You Make Me Feel," Michael Jackson (112 b/m) 4. "Pink Cadillac," Natalie Cole (125 b/m) 5. "Get Outta My Dreams," Billy Ocean (118 b/m) 6. "The Loco-motion," Kylie Minogue (130 b/m) 7. "Underneath the Radar," Underworld (146 b/m) 8. "Just Got Paid," Johnny Kemp (117 b/m) 9.
HEALTH
August 16, 2004 | Roy M. Wallack
They're more than heart rate monitors. Now they have names like "personal fitness computer," and they're jammed with such features as altimeters, thermometers and the capability of downloading workout data into your cellphone. They can make your workouts more efficient, whether you're a serious runner, biker or hiker or a first-time power walker in need of some coaching.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1986 | JODY BECKER, Times Staff Writer
Jason Davey had been sleeping too much. Returning home from his job this summer at a McDonald's near his Santa Ana home, Jason, 16, would sleep all afternoon and into the next morning. Although he was born with a defect that reduced his heart rate to only 45 beats per minute, he played on Little League teams and had always kept up with his friends. In August, Jason underwent an Activitrax implant at St.
NEWS
February 11, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Fetal heart rate monitoring is a modern technology used in childbirth that has been highly debated. Some doctors feel the monitors, which measure the baby's heart rate during labor, provide valuable information. Others, including some studies, suggest electronic monitors are unnecessary and were adapted without concrete evidence that they're helpful. Research published Saturday comes down on the side of using monitors. Scientists examined data from the National Birth Cohort of more than 1.9 million U.S. births in which a singleĀ  baby was delivered.
HEALTH
July 17, 2006 | Marc Siegel, Special to The Times
"Superman Returns," Warner Bros., July 2006 The premise: AFTER returning to Earth from an extended sojourn, Superman (Brandon Routh) saves a space shuttle and its carrier jumbo jet from disaster, is assaulted by and prevails over criminals (in an incredibly vivid scene, his invulnerability to bullets is depicted as one is actually flattened by his eyeball), and is attacked by the evil Lex Luthor (Kevin Spacey).
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