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HEALTH
April 11, 2011 | By Roy M. Wallack, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Debbie Bumgardner was an overworked 52-year-old legal secretary and frustrated yo-yo dieter from Tarzana who'd gradually cut back on tennis and biking over the years. By early 2010, she was 100 pounds overweight. A year later, Bumgardner is still overworked and stressed-out. But she's 70 pounds lighter, which she attributes almost entirely to Trikking. A Trikke (pronounced "trike") is a three-wheeled vehicle with foot platforms and upright handlebars that you propel in a standing position by shifting body weight from side-to-side, as if carving "S" turns while skiing.
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SPORTS
July 8, 1989 | JIM LINDGREN
Football has always been a way of life for Guy Liggins of the San Francisco 49ers. But after surgery Monday to temper a rare heart disorder, the former Castle Park High and Southwestern College receiver feels fortunate just to be living. And he is through with football. On June 26, Liggins, 23, was working out with a friend at San Jose State when "it just happened," he said. "My heart rate speeded up. It made me feel real dizzy, and I felt like I was going to pass out."
HEALTH
July 4, 2005 | Roy M. Wallack
Some personal trainers say that obtaining biofeedback is the best way to get the most out of your cardio training. Consisting of a chest strap that uses electrodes to detect your heart rate and a wristwatch readout that displays it as beats per minute, a heart rate monitor encourages you to stay in a heart rate target zone that is challenging enough to increase your fitness, but easy enough to avoid injury or exhaustion.
NATIONAL
September 22, 2012 | By Maeve Reston, Los Angeles Times
Mitt Romney's physician described the Republican presidential nominee as an "energetic, strong, physically fit" man who looks younger than his age in a letter released Friday that offered the first glimpse into the state of the candidate's health. Dr. Randall D. Gaz, who practices at Massachusetts General Hospital and has been Romney's personal physician since 1989, said the former Massachusetts governor has "no physical impairments that should interfere with his rigorous and demanding political career" or his hopes of becoming the next president.
SPORTS
August 27, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
OK, enough talk about Lance Armstrong and his possible use of drugs or blood doping as a performance enhancer. It turns out some athletes in the Paralympics, which begins Wednesday in London, use pain as a performance enhancer. Paralympics officials said Monday that, along with testing for banned drugs, they will be on the lookout for something called "boosting" among wheelchair athletes. What is boosting? Pain. In able-bodied athletes, physical exercise raises the heart rate and blood pressure, which helps you perform better during an event.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Exercising 15 minutes a day provides health benefits, a study finds , good news to those who are always strapped for time. The study, which appeared in the journal the Lancet this week, found that doing 15 minutes of leisure time physical activity was linked with an average three added years of life expectancy, along with a 10% decrease in cancer mortality and a 20% drop in cardiovascular disease, compared with sedentary people. So now that we have the good news, just what can you do in 15 minutes?
HEALTH
September 24, 2007
These Web-only Health offerings can be found at latimes.com/health: ASK US Our reporters answer readers' health questions. Today's query: When engaging in the most strenuous portion of my cardio workout, my heart rate routinely gets up to around 95% of the maximum heart rate calculated for my age. I am going by the standard formula or chart that's on the cardio machine. I don't feel winded and can sustain that rate for some time. Should I be concerned?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
HEART RATE HITS: Aerobicists' 10 Most Popular Workout Songs 1. "I Saw Him Standing There," Tiffany (increases average heart rate to 161 beats per minute) 2. "Wild, Wild West," The Escape Club (140 b/m) 3. "The Way You Make Me Feel," Michael Jackson (112 b/m) 4. "Pink Cadillac," Natalie Cole (125 b/m) 5. "Get Outta My Dreams," Billy Ocean (118 b/m) 6. "The Loco-motion," Kylie Minogue (130 b/m) 7. "Underneath the Radar," Underworld (146 b/m) 8. "Just Got Paid," Johnny Kemp (117 b/m) 9.
HEALTH
August 16, 2004 | Roy M. Wallack
They're more than heart rate monitors. Now they have names like "personal fitness computer," and they're jammed with such features as altimeters, thermometers and the capability of downloading workout data into your cellphone. They can make your workouts more efficient, whether you're a serious runner, biker or hiker or a first-time power walker in need of some coaching.
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