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HEALTH
June 13, 2005 | From the Washington Post
Fitness enthusiasts don't really need an oxygen testing program to be fit, but the test can help tailor workouts to a specific fitness level. Oxygen consumption testing, or VO2 max testing, has long been used to determine elite athletes' cardiac fitness. It can be applied to everyone, says Conrad Earnest, director of the Center for Human Performance and Nutrition Research at the Cooper Institute in Dallas.
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SPORTS
July 8, 1989 | JIM LINDGREN
Football has always been a way of life for Guy Liggins of the San Francisco 49ers. But after surgery Monday to temper a rare heart disorder, the former Castle Park High and Southwestern College receiver feels fortunate just to be living. And he is through with football. On June 26, Liggins, 23, was working out with a friend at San Jose State when "it just happened," he said. "My heart rate speeded up. It made me feel real dizzy, and I felt like I was going to pass out."
BUSINESS
May 3, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn, This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details
Are you addicted to checking your work email? Do you check it first thing in the morning and right before you go to bed? Do you check it on work breaks and even on vacations?  Well, here's a piece of advice: Stop. According to a new study by researchers at UC Irvine , people who check their work email regularly exhibit higher states of stress, and less focus, than workers who continue to do their jobs while being cut off from email entirely. The study examined the heart rate of workers at a suburban office outside of Boston.
NEWS
February 11, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Fetal heart rate monitoring is a modern technology used in childbirth that has been highly debated. Some doctors feel the monitors, which measure the baby's heart rate during labor, provide valuable information. Others, including some studies, suggest electronic monitors are unnecessary and were adapted without concrete evidence that they're helpful. Research published Saturday comes down on the side of using monitors. Scientists examined data from the National Birth Cohort of more than 1.9 million U.S. births in which a single  baby was delivered.
SCIENCE
September 1, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Slave to your email? Wonder what would happen if you had to do without it? UC Irvine informatics professor Gloria Mark was curious - so she recently led a study that separated 13 people from their email for five days and recorded what happened when they unplugged. Mark spoke with The Times about the joys and sorrows of ditching email and why the Army is interested in her research. What made you want to see how people fared without email? That was way back in 2005. I had this crazy idea that people were addicted to email.
HEALTH
July 4, 2005 | Roy M. Wallack
Some personal trainers say that obtaining biofeedback is the best way to get the most out of your cardio training. Consisting of a chest strap that uses electrodes to detect your heart rate and a wristwatch readout that displays it as beats per minute, a heart rate monitor encourages you to stay in a heart rate target zone that is challenging enough to increase your fitness, but easy enough to avoid injury or exhaustion.
SCIENCE
February 7, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Hugh Laurie only plays a doctor on TV, but he has a following among physicians in Germany who are crediting his fictional Dr. House with helping them diagnose a man with a life-threatening case of cobalt intoxication. The 55-year-old patient was referred to their clinic in Marburg in May 2012 suffering from severe heart failure. An echocardiogram revealed that his ejection fraction - a measure of how well his heart was pumping blood - was only about 25%. (In a healthy person, it's between 55% and 70%, according to the Cleveland Clinic .)
HEALTH
September 24, 2007
These Web-only Health offerings can be found at latimes.com/health: ASK US Our reporters answer readers' health questions. Today's query: When engaging in the most strenuous portion of my cardio workout, my heart rate routinely gets up to around 95% of the maximum heart rate calculated for my age. I am going by the standard formula or chart that's on the cardio machine. I don't feel winded and can sustain that rate for some time. Should I be concerned?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
HEART RATE HITS: Aerobicists' 10 Most Popular Workout Songs 1. "I Saw Him Standing There," Tiffany (increases average heart rate to 161 beats per minute) 2. "Wild, Wild West," The Escape Club (140 b/m) 3. "The Way You Make Me Feel," Michael Jackson (112 b/m) 4. "Pink Cadillac," Natalie Cole (125 b/m) 5. "Get Outta My Dreams," Billy Ocean (118 b/m) 6. "The Loco-motion," Kylie Minogue (130 b/m) 7. "Underneath the Radar," Underworld (146 b/m) 8. "Just Got Paid," Johnny Kemp (117 b/m) 9.
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