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SPORTS
July 8, 1989 | JIM LINDGREN
Football has always been a way of life for Guy Liggins of the San Francisco 49ers. But after surgery Monday to temper a rare heart disorder, the former Castle Park High and Southwestern College receiver feels fortunate just to be living. And he is through with football. On June 26, Liggins, 23, was working out with a friend at San Jose State when "it just happened," he said. "My heart rate speeded up. It made me feel real dizzy, and I felt like I was going to pass out."
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HEALTH
March 23, 2013 | By Melinda Fulmer
Ready to kick-start your fitness routine but don't want to face the crowds at the gym? We've got you covered. The Los Angeles Times reviewed a recent crop of fitness DVDs and selected our picks of the best gym-free workouts for exercisers of different levels and interests. Whether you're trying to build muscle, protect your knees or just start moving your body, we've got a workout for you. You're an intermediate exerciser looking for a new challenge: If you haven't tried kettlebells, you're missing out on a super-efficient workout that builds strength and blasts fat all at once.
HEALTH
April 11, 2011 | By Roy M. Wallack, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When the music starts up in the Zumba dance class at Big Bear's Mountain Fitness Center gym, everyone is on their feet — except for Pam Newman. She's the 300-plus-pound woman in the back of the room who's lost 100 pounds in the last year by violating the "standing to exercise" rule. That's because she enthusiastically kicks her legs and flails her arms … while sitting down on a bench. Newman, the director of a local preschool and a grandmother of five, can't stand up and dance — yet. A year ago she weighed 440 pounds; for seven years, she barely moved, walking only from her door to the car on crutches.
HEALTH
August 10, 2009 | Marc Siegel
"Royal Pains" USA Network, July 30 Episode: "The Honeymoon's Over" The premise Chuck Sutherland, a famous children's book illustrator, has been admitted to Hamptons Heritage, a hospital on Long Island, for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a cardiac arrhythmia (in this case, atrial fibrillation, in which the collecting chambers of the heart quiver instead of pump). He is supposed to have surgery but, instead, signs out of the hospital "against medical advice" with prescriptions for the diuretic Lasix, which reduces blood volume, and a calcium channel blocker, which lowers blood pressure and heart rate.
HEALTH
July 4, 2005 | Roy M. Wallack
Some personal trainers say that obtaining biofeedback is the best way to get the most out of your cardio training. Consisting of a chest strap that uses electrodes to detect your heart rate and a wristwatch readout that displays it as beats per minute, a heart rate monitor encourages you to stay in a heart rate target zone that is challenging enough to increase your fitness, but easy enough to avoid injury or exhaustion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2003 | Cara Mia DiMassa, Times Staff Writer
The question, posed by a group of high school teachers at USC's Wrigley Institute Saturday, had the makings of the set-up for a bad joke. How do you monitor the heartbeat of a crab? The answer, it turned out, was more than obvious: Carefully. For the nine local high school teachers, the weekend conference on Catalina Island, which was sponsored by USC and the Global Heartbeat program, was a fun way to learn about the ins and outs of heart-rate monitors for the ocean-dwelling set.
HEALTH
September 1, 2012 | Melinda Fulmer
Take your weight routine to the next level with this high-intensity cardio drill. The Russian dance is a favorite of personal trainer and group fitness instructor Amy Dixon, who uses it on her latest high-intensity interval training video, "Breathless Body Volume 2: The Edge. " Sandwich this drill between weight-bearing exercises to create a circuit that packs in a cardio and strength workout at the same time. -- What it does This move gets your heart rate up quickly, allowing you to burn a lot of calories while challenging your leg muscles.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn, This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details
Are you addicted to checking your work email? Do you check it first thing in the morning and right before you go to bed? Do you check it on work breaks and even on vacations?  Well, here's a piece of advice: Stop. According to a new study by researchers at UC Irvine , people who check their work email regularly exhibit higher states of stress, and less focus, than workers who continue to do their jobs while being cut off from email entirely. The study examined the heart rate of workers at a suburban office outside of Boston.
HEALTH
December 29, 2012 | By Melinda Fulmer
Cardio doesn't have to be deadly dull and serious. In this fun animal-inspired exercise, you'll get your heart rate up, build muscle and you might even crack a smile. Called the lateral traveling ape, this move is part of the new "Animal Flow Workout" that body weight fitness pro Mike Fitch developed for Equinox gyms. What it does It's great for entire body conditioning, as it works muscles in the arms, shoulders and legs at the same time it's elevating your heart rate and torching calories.
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