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Heart Rate

SPORTS
July 8, 1989 | JIM LINDGREN
Football has always been a way of life for Guy Liggins of the San Francisco 49ers. But after surgery Monday to temper a rare heart disorder, the former Castle Park High and Southwestern College receiver feels fortunate just to be living. And he is through with football. On June 26, Liggins, 23, was working out with a friend at San Jose State when "it just happened," he said. "My heart rate speeded up. It made me feel real dizzy, and I felt like I was going to pass out."
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HEALTH
December 29, 2012 | By Melinda Fulmer
Cardio doesn't have to be deadly dull and serious. In this fun animal-inspired exercise, you'll get your heart rate up, build muscle and you might even crack a smile. Called the lateral traveling ape, this move is part of the new "Animal Flow Workout" that body weight fitness pro Mike Fitch developed for Equinox gyms. What it does It's great for entire body conditioning, as it works muscles in the arms, shoulders and legs at the same time it's elevating your heart rate and torching calories.
HEALTH
March 23, 2013 | By Melinda Fulmer
Ready to kick-start your fitness routine but don't want to face the crowds at the gym? We've got you covered. The Los Angeles Times reviewed a recent crop of fitness DVDs and selected our picks of the best gym-free workouts for exercisers of different levels and interests. Whether you're trying to build muscle, protect your knees or just start moving your body, we've got a workout for you. You're an intermediate exerciser looking for a new challenge: If you haven't tried kettlebells, you're missing out on a super-efficient workout that builds strength and blasts fat all at once.
HEALTH
February 4, 2002 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
SANTA MONICA--I arrived early, and already there was a crowd waiting at the door. Minutes later, more than a hundred of us packed into the basement of the Boathouse in Santa Monica, tentatively swinging our hips to the swaying tropical rhythms. Our salsa teacher, Raoul Santiago, stood on the stage in wool pants, a crisp white T-shirt and a New York Yankee cap. He was teaching us to move our feet, hips, knees to the beat--and to smile seductively into our partners' eyes.
HEALTH
July 4, 2005 | Roy M. Wallack
Some personal trainers say that obtaining biofeedback is the best way to get the most out of your cardio training. Consisting of a chest strap that uses electrodes to detect your heart rate and a wristwatch readout that displays it as beats per minute, a heart rate monitor encourages you to stay in a heart rate target zone that is challenging enough to increase your fitness, but easy enough to avoid injury or exhaustion.
HEALTH
September 6, 2012 | By Jessica P. Ogilvie
RuPaul became famous for his over-the-top drag performances and later, his VH1 show, "RuPaul's Drag Race. " But recently, the 51-year-old performer has turned his focus inward, embarking on a hiking regimen in his hometown of Los Angeles that, he says, has changed his life physically, emotionally and spiritually. We talked to him about what making that change was like, and the impact it's had on his life. How did you get into hiking? It started when I quit smoking. I was around 40, and I knew that I needed to get out of the house and occupy myself.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn, This post has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details
Are you addicted to checking your work email? Do you check it first thing in the morning and right before you go to bed? Do you check it on work breaks and even on vacations?  Well, here's a piece of advice: Stop. According to a new study by researchers at UC Irvine , people who check their work email regularly exhibit higher states of stress, and less focus, than workers who continue to do their jobs while being cut off from email entirely. The study examined the heart rate of workers at a suburban office outside of Boston.
NEWS
August 17, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Exercising 15 minutes a day provides health benefits, a study finds , good news to those who are always strapped for time. The study, which appeared in the journal the Lancet this week, found that doing 15 minutes of leisure time physical activity was linked with an average three added years of life expectancy, along with a 10% decrease in cancer mortality and a 20% drop in cardiovascular disease, compared with sedentary people. So now that we have the good news, just what can you do in 15 minutes?
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