Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHeart Rate
IN THE NEWS

Heart Rate

HEALTH
September 24, 2007
These Web-only Health offerings can be found at latimes.com/health: ASK US Our reporters answer readers' health questions. Today's query: When engaging in the most strenuous portion of my cardio workout, my heart rate routinely gets up to around 95% of the maximum heart rate calculated for my age. I am going by the standard formula or chart that's on the cardio machine. I don't feel winded and can sustain that rate for some time. Should I be concerned?
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
HEART RATE HITS: Aerobicists' 10 Most Popular Workout Songs 1. "I Saw Him Standing There," Tiffany (increases average heart rate to 161 beats per minute) 2. "Wild, Wild West," The Escape Club (140 b/m) 3. "The Way You Make Me Feel," Michael Jackson (112 b/m) 4. "Pink Cadillac," Natalie Cole (125 b/m) 5. "Get Outta My Dreams," Billy Ocean (118 b/m) 6. "The Loco-motion," Kylie Minogue (130 b/m) 7. "Underneath the Radar," Underworld (146 b/m) 8. "Just Got Paid," Johnny Kemp (117 b/m) 9.
HEALTH
August 16, 2004 | Roy M. Wallack
They're more than heart rate monitors. Now they have names like "personal fitness computer," and they're jammed with such features as altimeters, thermometers and the capability of downloading workout data into your cellphone. They can make your workouts more efficient, whether you're a serious runner, biker or hiker or a first-time power walker in need of some coaching.
HEALTH
November 16, 2009 | Roy M. Wallack
Nothing would seem to be more "green" than exercise, which gives off sweat and smell but not pollution. But if you get your cardio on a machine, you're not completely eco-clean unless you use one that doesn't plug into a wall socket, which is at least partially powered by fossil-fuel-burning power plants. Aside from a few categories -- rowing machines, spinning bikes and some high-end self-generating exer-bikes -- there have been no other electricity-free treadmills and ellipticals available until just a few months ago. Here's the first look at the workout world's newest green machines.
HEALTH
August 10, 2009 | Marc Siegel
"Royal Pains" USA Network, July 30 Episode: "The Honeymoon's Over" The premise Chuck Sutherland, a famous children's book illustrator, has been admitted to Hamptons Heritage, a hospital on Long Island, for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and a cardiac arrhythmia (in this case, atrial fibrillation, in which the collecting chambers of the heart quiver instead of pump). He is supposed to have surgery but, instead, signs out of the hospital "against medical advice" with prescriptions for the diuretic Lasix, which reduces blood volume, and a calcium channel blocker, which lowers blood pressure and heart rate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1986 | JODY BECKER, Times Staff Writer
Jason Davey had been sleeping too much. Returning home from his job this summer at a McDonald's near his Santa Ana home, Jason, 16, would sleep all afternoon and into the next morning. Although he was born with a defect that reduced his heart rate to only 45 beats per minute, he played on Little League teams and had always kept up with his friends. In August, Jason underwent an Activitrax implant at St.
NEWS
February 11, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times
Fetal heart rate monitoring is a modern technology used in childbirth that has been highly debated. Some doctors feel the monitors, which measure the baby's heart rate during labor, provide valuable information. Others, including some studies, suggest electronic monitors are unnecessary and were adapted without concrete evidence that they're helpful. Research published Saturday comes down on the side of using monitors. Scientists examined data from the National Birth Cohort of more than 1.9 million U.S. births in which a singleĀ  baby was delivered.
NEWS
June 15, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots blog
Men with cardiovascular disease often wonder whether sexual activity might be dangerous for them, potentially triggering a heart attack in the midst of the excitement, or whether the exercise might actually be good for the heart. A new review by the Harvard Men's Health Watch indicates that, as exercise, sex is probably not very helpful, but it is also most likely not very dangerous either. Careful studies have shown that about one in every 100 heart attacks is related to sexual activity; for fatal arrhythmias, the rate is about one in 200. For a healthy 50-year-old man, the risk of having a heart attack in any one hour is about one in a million; sexual activity doubles the risk, but that risk is still just two in a million.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|