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REAL ESTATE
May 3, 1998
Here are the top-selling home builders in Orange County, through the first quarter of 1998: 1) Shea Homes: 130 houses 2) Lewis Homes: 87 houses 3) Hearthside Homes: 81 houses 4) Western Pacific Housing: 80 houses 5) California Pacific Homes: 79 houses Source: Market Profiles of San Diego.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2010 | By Britney Barnes, Los Angeles Times
Despite the environmental community's pleas to "save it, don't pave it," the Huntington Beach City Council has approved plans to convert a former 5-acre archeological site near the Bolsa Chica wetlands into the city's first "green" housing development. "I'm sure every community has its cross to bear, and Bolsa Chica has been Huntington's for a long time," said Councilman Don Hansen, who voted to approve the project. "I find all the findings that were presented tonight adequate." But environmentalists who packed Tuesday's meeting raised concerns about building a 22-home development so close to the wetlands and argued that the area is of great ecological and historical importance.
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BUSINESS
January 9, 1998 | E. Scott Reckard
Irvine Co. tycoon Donald Bren's home-building company and huge Kaufman & Broad Home Corp. have been bumped as Orange County's top builders, their customary position during the mid-1990s when other builders found it hard to get financing. The Meyers Group, a consulting firm that tracks new housing, said John Laing Homes sold 623 homes at 11 Orange County projects last year, compared with 605 sold at 13 projects by California Pacific Homes, Bren's home-building company. Kaufman & Broad was No.
OPINION
September 10, 2005
Re "Battle over Bolsa Chica marshland not over yet," letter, Aug. 28 I want to clearly state that all of my 6.2 acres are on the bluff above Bolsa Chica, not in the marshland. Julie Bixby's letter implies that my land is in the marshland itself, which is incorrect. The bunker in question was not completed nor used in World War II. Second, the claim that my property is home to a "sacred Indian site" is erroneous. Signal Landmark Development, now Hearthside Homes, spent several years researching and excavating the entire area and found no evidence of Indian artifacts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1999 | Eron Ben-Yehuda, (714) 965-7172, Ext. 13
Additional soil samples tested last month confirmed cancer-causing chemicals exist on property south of the Bolsa Chica mesa, but in an area smaller than previously thought, an official for the property owner said. The "hot" spot is limited to a section where Graham Street dead-ends near the 42-acre Fieldstone property, said Lucy Dunn, executive vice president of Hearthside Homes, which owns the land. The substance involved is polychlorinated biphenyls, Dunn said.
OPINION
September 10, 2005
Re "Battle over Bolsa Chica marshland not over yet," letter, Aug. 28 I want to clearly state that all of my 6.2 acres are on the bluff above Bolsa Chica, not in the marshland. Julie Bixby's letter implies that my land is in the marshland itself, which is incorrect. The bunker in question was not completed nor used in World War II. Second, the claim that my property is home to a "sacred Indian site" is erroneous. Signal Landmark Development, now Hearthside Homes, spent several years researching and excavating the entire area and found no evidence of Indian artifacts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A judge Wednesday ordered a hearing that could lead to a new environmental study at a Huntington Beach construction site where ancient bones were found last week. Orange County Superior Court Judge William McDonald set a Sept. 8 hearing to determine if discovery of human remains on a six-acre site overlooking the Bolsa Chica wetlands requires a full environmental review.
OPINION
March 16, 2003
With no media coverage or fanfare, Hearthside Homes' spurious "takings" lawsuit against the California Coastal Commission was finally tossed out of court last month for having no cause of action. This is a victory for the Coastal Commission that needs to be known in all circles. Once again, the developers of the Bolsa Chica mesa had tried to use the courts to bully our environmental protection system and were beaten back by common sense and clear adherence to the intent and process of the California Coastal Act. The Bolsa Chica Land Trust is proud to have been a partner with the stalwart Coastal Commission in defending the suit and once again is thrilled to be on the winning side.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2001
In "City to Seek Funds for Bolsa Chica" (March 7), The Times reported that the Huntington Beach City Council voted 4 to 3 to start negotiations with the developer (Hearthside Homes/Koll) for the purchase of Bolsa Chica. Hearthside Homes suggested it would be willing to sell at a profit for their shareholders. Assemblyman Tom Harman has proposed AB 1256, which would set aside $25 million for the purchase, and for the first time in 30 years, there's money to complete the purchase. The surplus that is budgeted already is earmarked for open space and parks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2001
It is ironic that Hearthside Homes, the same developer that has been crying for "closure" on the Bolsa Chica issue for years to anyone who would listen, has chosen to prolong the permitting process by suing the Coastal Commission. ("Bolsa Chica Builder Sues Coastal Panel," Jan. 13.) When Hearthside acquired the property on the Bolsa Chica Mesa, it was zoned agricultural. It had every right to pursue entitlements to build, but certainly never any guarantees that these entitlements would be granted.
OPINION
March 16, 2003
With no media coverage or fanfare, Hearthside Homes' spurious "takings" lawsuit against the California Coastal Commission was finally tossed out of court last month for having no cause of action. This is a victory for the Coastal Commission that needs to be known in all circles. Once again, the developers of the Bolsa Chica mesa had tried to use the courts to bully our environmental protection system and were beaten back by common sense and clear adherence to the intent and process of the California Coastal Act. The Bolsa Chica Land Trust is proud to have been a partner with the stalwart Coastal Commission in defending the suit and once again is thrilled to be on the winning side.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2002 | SEEMA MEHTA and DAVE McKIBBEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
State toxic-substance examiners, in tests that were expanded last week, have discovered a cancer-causing compound in the lawns of homes near the Bolsa Chica wetlands, unnerving homeowners who worry about their exposure to the chemicals as well as their tanking property values. "I would leave in a heartbeat, but I can't," said Chris Daly, who two years ago bought a $580,000 home next to a Bankton Drive house where moderate levels of PCBs were discovered in the lawn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2001
Re "A Big Step for Bolsa Chica," Nov. 25: The editorial accurately reflected the history of and proceedings on the restoration of the Bolsa Chica wetlands and thoughtfully focused on the issues of concern to our community. As you pointed out, the California Coastal Commission imposed strict water quality monitoring and remediation requirements on the project. Because no urban runoff will flow into the wetlands from Orange County flood-control channels, that usual source of beach contamination will be eliminated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2001
As a resident of Huntington Beach, I have watched with disgust and dismay as yet another development plan for the Bolsa Chica mesa is on its way to be approved by the governing authorities. I am 100% against the 387-home development that is proposed for the mesa (Aug. 14). This construction will destroy valuable foraging habitat for the wildlife that thrives on the mesa and the wetlands below. It will also destroy land sacred to the Acjachemen Nation, the Juaneno band of Mission Indians and the Gabrieleno/Tongva Tribal Council of the Tongva Nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2001 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Developer Hearthside Homes is moving forward with plans to build 387 homes on the upper portion of the two-tier Bolsa Chica mesa, while letting the courts decide the fate of the rest of its land. "It appears that everyone agrees that this is where development should go," said Lucy Dunn, Hearthside's executive vice president. "There was no opposition to development on the upper bench at any time by any group."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 11, 2001
In "City to Seek Funds for Bolsa Chica" (March 7), The Times reported that the Huntington Beach City Council voted 4 to 3 to start negotiations with the developer (Hearthside Homes/Koll) for the purchase of Bolsa Chica. Hearthside Homes suggested it would be willing to sell at a profit for their shareholders. Assemblyman Tom Harman has proposed AB 1256, which would set aside $25 million for the purchase, and for the first time in 30 years, there's money to complete the purchase. The surplus that is budgeted already is earmarked for open space and parks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 2010 | By Britney Barnes, Los Angeles Times
Despite the environmental community's pleas to "save it, don't pave it," the Huntington Beach City Council has approved plans to convert a former 5-acre archeological site near the Bolsa Chica wetlands into the city's first "green" housing development. "I'm sure every community has its cross to bear, and Bolsa Chica has been Huntington's for a long time," said Councilman Don Hansen, who voted to approve the project. "I find all the findings that were presented tonight adequate." But environmentalists who packed Tuesday's meeting raised concerns about building a 22-home development so close to the wetlands and argued that the area is of great ecological and historical importance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2001
It is ironic that Hearthside Homes, the same developer that has been crying for "closure" on the Bolsa Chica issue for years to anyone who would listen, has chosen to prolong the permitting process by suing the Coastal Commission. ("Bolsa Chica Builder Sues Coastal Panel," Jan. 13.) When Hearthside acquired the property on the Bolsa Chica Mesa, it was zoned agricultural. It had every right to pursue entitlements to build, but certainly never any guarantees that these entitlements would be granted.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2000 | DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state agency's decision to curb the long-controversial home-building project on a mesa off the Bolsa Chica wetlands could cut the development's value by more than 60%, an expert said Friday. The panel's decision, rendered late Thursday, leaves California Coastal Communities Inc., parent company of developer Hearthside Homes, with a project worth less than $50 million, said Eric van der Porten, an analyst at Leeward Investments in San Carlos, Calif.
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