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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2011 | By Ramie Becker, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Valentine's Day is a high-pressure holiday, no matter what your relationship status says. Venerated or vilified, the date is packed with events; L.A. seems to be overflowing with innovative ways to make the entire weekend a lovefest. Whether you're spending this Valentine's Day indulging a loved one or being self-indulgent, there's a meal, mixer, dance, date night or gondola ride for you. Dig in, it's time to feel the love. Thursday Lucha Va Voom: My Kinky Valentine . Valentine's Day threatens to overwhelm us all with a gooey mess of lovey-dovey, but Lucha Va Voom will wipe your eyeballs clean of all that.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
A remake of the 1984 film of the same name, the new "Red Dawn" arrives in theaters following years of delays involving bankruptcy and a switch of the film's central villains from the Chinese to North Koreans. If the original, with its premise of American teenagers fighting off a Russian invasion, was something like "The Outsiders Fight Back" steeped in last-gasp Cold War anxiety, this update never finds an equivalent relevance or hook, failing to connect fully with our here and now. While a foreign regime exerting its emergent power over America certainly has a familiar ring to it, if anything, this new "Red Dawn" is a movie in search of its moment.
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OPINION
August 20, 2006
Re "U.S. Hopes to Rival Hezbollah With Rebuilding Effort," Aug. 17 It seems a little ironic that only now is the Bush administration realizing that to win hearts and minds it is better to help the people who have been adversely affected by another petty war. It will be interesting to see who wins the hearts and minds of the displaced Lebanese -- Hezbollah, on the ground with actual physical help, or Halliburton, with an open-end, no-bid contract and...
SPORTS
February 15, 2012 | By Sam Farmer
This isn't football, it's an unseemly game of tennis. First, the ball's in the court of the Indianapolis Colts. Then, it's in Peyton Manning's court. Colts. Peyton. Colts. Peyton. Every swing chips at their once indivisible bond and at all the memories they built. Manning, the NFL's only four-time most valuable player, has made it plain he wants to continue his football career, and his doctor has cleared him to do so. Grateful as they are for what he has done - and no athlete has done more for his franchise - the Colts are focused on their next chapter, the one that begins with them making Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck the first pick in April's draft.
SPORTS
January 15, 2010 | By Lisa Dillman
Danny Davis wasn't alone on his history-making halfpipe run here the other day, his journey on the board bolstered by the vibe of a close friend, almost riding shotgun. Nor was Hannah Teter truly running solo when she steeled to take on the icy pipe, preparing to drop in and chase a spot at the Olympics in Vancouver next month. Kevin Pearce wasn't in Mammoth. But the severely injured and hospitalized snowboarder has found a safe place, deep in the hearts and minds of his friends and colleagues in the tight snowboarding community.
WORLD
February 1, 2007 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Times Staff Writer
A U.S. Army colonel danced the debka at a garden party in this rural village last month, hand in hand with half a dozen former Kurdish guerrillas. They were a study in contrasts: Col. Patrick Stackpole with crisp fatigues and a blond buzz cut, pistol strapped to his thigh, stomping along with swarthy peshmerga fighters with thick black mustaches, baggy shirwal pants and Muslim prayer beads.
NEWS
February 27, 1996 | SCOTT SHIBUYA BROWN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
To know of her was to envy her. To know her was to not. On the surface, what made the San Francisco woman the subject of envy was her grand romance with a man several years her senior, a well-known figure who had once been her teacher. Although he was married, it was a dizzying and passionate affair by her account--the details of which she would tantalize friends with, saying she "couldn't really talk about it." The affair purportedly ended when she abruptly left the country for another job.
NEWS
March 9, 2008
Editors' choice: If the U.S. wants to be successful in Iraq and Afghanistan, it must return to fighting a conventional war with its full military power, not covert operations, Michael Scheuer writes. The battle for 'hearts and minds' is already lost, he says. OPINION, M1
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2000
Re "With Money Comes a Wealth of Side Effects," Ventura County Life column, March 19. I would suggest to the poor darlings who find themselves suddenly rich and "adrift" that they go out and find a worthy cause to apply their hearts and minds to--and also some of their newfound wealth. There are plenty of them. PAULINE HUTSON Ventura
SPORTS
September 9, 1989
Bart Giamatti left an indelible mark in the hearts and minds of baseball fans throughout America. The baseball world has lost a true friend and a great human being. PHILIP STEIN, Mission Viejo
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Bert Schneider, the iconoclastic producer behind a trio of influential movies — "Easy Rider," "Five Easy Pieces" and "The Last Picture Show" — that captured the rootlessness and discontent of the late 1960s and '70s and became symbols of a new era in Hollywood, has died. He was 78. Schneider had been in failing health and died of natural causes Monday at Olympia Medical Center in Los Angeles, said his daughter, Audrey Simon. The son of a Hollywood power broker — his father, Abraham, ran Columbia Pictures in the late 1960s — Schneider helped revitalize moviemaking in the "New Hollywood" movement in which directors, not studios, held the creative reins and made movies that embraced the sensibilities of the emerging counterculture.
HEALTH
November 14, 2011 | By James S. Fell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
My grandmothers always called me Jamie. Everyone did, until I insisted that we switch to the name on my birth certificate. This happened around the same time I attempted to grow my first mustache. Regardless, there is a history of me using the name Jamie. I tell you this because I want you to join Jamie Fell's Fitness Rebellion. Sound familiar? Of course, there are a few differences between me and chef-activist Jamie Oliver (beyond the fact that I don't have an Emmy-winning reality show on TV)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2011 | By Ramie Becker, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Valentine's Day is a high-pressure holiday, no matter what your relationship status says. Venerated or vilified, the date is packed with events; L.A. seems to be overflowing with innovative ways to make the entire weekend a lovefest. Whether you're spending this Valentine's Day indulging a loved one or being self-indulgent, there's a meal, mixer, dance, date night or gondola ride for you. Dig in, it's time to feel the love. Thursday Lucha Va Voom: My Kinky Valentine . Valentine's Day threatens to overwhelm us all with a gooey mess of lovey-dovey, but Lucha Va Voom will wipe your eyeballs clean of all that.
WORLD
August 17, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
"So, did you have your three cups of tea?" a U.S. infantryman, bulky in body armor, asked another soldier as he emerged from the mud-brick home of an Afghan village elder. In this case, it wasn't tea but slices of cool melon, served to the sweating troops who spent an hour crouched on a plastic tarp covering the dirt floor of the house in this hamlet in northern Afghanistan. But the phrase "three cups of tea" has entered the American troop lexicon as shorthand for any leisurely, trust-building chat with locals.
WORLD
June 29, 2010 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
Stricken with severe chest pains recently, a village elder named Shabarat Sageed made his way to a U.S. Special Forces base near this remote settlement in southern Afghanistan. Soldiers there radioed a U.S. medical helicopter unit at a bigger compound 55 miles south. Within minutes, crews climbed aboard two Black Hawk helicopters for a 38-minute flight to pick up the ailing man. Sageed, hobbling on a hand-carved wooden cane, was then flown to a U.S. military clinic. The extraordinary effort to treat a single villager is one way the U.S. military is trying to woo Afghans away from the Taliban in parts of southern Afghanistan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2010 | Steve Lopez
Memo to Meg Whitman, Steve Poizner and Jerry Brown: I've been talking to independent voters, the fastest-growing political force in California and a group that could decide this year's race for governor, and they are not impressed. With any of you. On the up side, they haven't counted you out yet. So, with next month's primary and the November general election, you've got time to win them over. But it won't be easy. This little project of mine began a few weeks ago when I put out a call to independents, asking for volunteers who'd let me check in with them over the next several months as they endure millions of dollars worth of vapid TV advertising, distortions, generalizations and name-calling by candidates.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1989
Your headline and lead article on July 23 were not only in bad taste but disgusting, revolting and repulsive; a blow to the hearts and minds of all people who want peace. Sure, we want all the news, but not the worst-scene scenario highlighted on the Sunday front page when so many positive things are going on in the world. EUGENE DECHENE Los Angeles
NEWS
February 9, 1993
Zan Thompson's "A Farewell Wish" expresses sentiments and wisdom that can apply to each of us. Her wish is an eloquently expressed gift encouraging the appreciation of life through intimate, personal experience. Her wish, however, can never be regarded as a farewell; it will remain in the hearts and minds of her readers forever. JOAN FAITH FORMAN Redondo Beach
SPORTS
February 21, 2010 | Chris Erskine
Know what I like? Ice dancing -- the elegance, the artistry, the physical contact. I used to express myself by cursing politicians on TV or swearing at other drivers. Now, ice dancing has come into my life. Ice dancing is the sort of sport Barry Manilow might've invented. It belongs in Las Vegas, except it would all probably melt. Then it would be water dancing, which doesn't sound so bad. Just imagine what NBC would do with a "skin cam." Right away you're probably thinking, "Oh, this dude's writing about ice dancing, he's going to make fun of it."
SPORTS
February 4, 2010 | Mark Heisler
No. 1 in scoring among the Lakers, if not yet in the hearts of Lakerdom. . . . These days it's an exploit a month for Kobe Bryant, the youngest NBA player to score 20,000 points . . . and 21,000, 22,000, 23,000, 24,000 and 25,000 . . . who just passed Jerry West's 25,192 to break the Lakers' record. Of course, it was coming for years. The only surprise was the outcry among Lakers fans at references to Bryant as the best Laker ever by the Lakers broadcast team and local papers.
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