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Heat Strokes

SPORTS
August 9, 2001 | SAM FARMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Minnesota Viking officials met for two hours Wednesday with state investigators looking into the heatstroke death of tackle Korey Stringer. "We walked through our entire setup, top to bottom," said Viking Vice President Mike Kelly, who, along with the team trainer and equipment manager, met with investigators from the state's Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
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SPORTS
August 3, 2001 | DIANE PUCIN
The breeze is sweet on this cloudy morning, bursts of cool air off the Pacific. When the puffs of wind arrive, a dozen, maybe two dozen San Diego Charger football players turn their faces west, toward the ocean, toward that blowing air. At this time of year, in training camp, the Chargers are the envy of everyone in the NFL. Training camp is less than a mile from the ocean, at UC San Diego.
NEWS
August 2, 2001 | ROB FERNAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By taking precautions, such as frequent water breaks and practicing at cooler times of the day, football teams can prevent heat-related tragedies like the one that befell Korey Stringer of the Minnesota Vikings this week, medical and athletic training authorities say. The All-Pro offensive lineman died Wednesday after he was stricken during workouts Tuesday in extreme heat and humidity at a training camp in Mankato, Minn.
NEWS
July 28, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Unrelenting summer heat was being blamed for more than two dozen deaths, buckled pavement and badly stressed electrical grids across the Midwest. The heat-related death toll in St. Louis rose to seven since late last week with the discovery of the partially decomposed body of another elderly resident, the local medical examiner said. The victim's apartment lacked air conditioning. Two other deaths across the Mississippi River in East St. Louis and Peoria, Ill.
SPORTS
August 2, 2001 | STEVE ROSENBLOOM, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
The rain fell. The news hit. The tears flowed. This small college town that is the summer home to the Minnesota Vikings endured death Wednesday. "He was 27 years old," Bill Breitbarth said. "You're just starting your life then." Breitbarth, 64, a stocky, ruddy-faced retired businessmen, gingerly cradled a beer in the aging brick building called the Circle Inn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2007 | Dave McKibben
A 16-year old football player who collapsed in August during practice at Arnold O. Beckman High School in Irvine died of heatstroke, the Orange County coroner's office said Thursday. Kenny Wilson, a 6-foot-2, 276-pound junior lineman, fell ill toward the end of 2 1/2 hours of conditioning drills that began at 8:30 a.m. Aug. 17. Officials with the Tustin Unified School District said the heat-related death could prompt policy changes for athletic practices.
SPORTS
August 2, 2001 | J.A. ADANDE
If there was a moment that provided any hope at all in the disturbing aftermath of Minnesota Viking lineman Korey Stringer's death, it came when teammate Randy Moss put his head down and cried. He and fellow wide receiver Cris Carter and Viking Coach Dennis Green held a news conference. They couldn't provide the medical details of how workouts in the summer heat caused Stringer's body to shut down. They didn't want to discuss the circumstances that led to the tragedy.
BUSINESS
June 30, 1994 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So you think it's hot? Just be glad you don't have to work all day on a tar roof, lifting heavy materials dozens of feet above the ground with absolutely no shade in sight. In an informal survey of the "hottest" jobs in the sweltering summer heat, roofers topped the list, followed by other construction workers, dry-cleaning employees--and Mickey Mouse.
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