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Heather O Rourke

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NEWS
February 3, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Heather O'Rourke, the terrified youngster sucked into a spectral vacuum by supernatural spirits in the "Poltergeist" films, has died on an operating table at a San Diego hospital, it was reported Tuesday. The 12-year-old ingenue, who finished filming "Poltergeist III" last June in which she starred as the angelic Carol Ann Freeling for the third time, died late Monday afternoon.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
"They're here." That phrase, uttered by the late child actress Heather O'Rourke in the horror classic "Poltergeist," has sent chills up moviegoers' spines for 25 years. And undoubtedly, they'll do it once more Thursday, as the Motion Picture Academy's Science and Technology Council presents a "Prime Tech" screening at the Linwood Dunn Theater in Hollywood.
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NEWS
May 26, 1988 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Heather O'Rourke, the young actress pulled into a supernatural vacuum in the "Poltergeist" movies, died because the doctors who treated her throughout her childhood failed to diagnose a long-standing obstruction of the small bowel that led to her death on Feb. 1, according to a wrongful-death suit filed Wednesday by a law firm representing the girl's mother. The 12-year-old actress, who warned, "They're heeere!" in "Poltergeist" and "They're baaack!"
NEWS
May 26, 1988 | BOB BAKER, Times Staff Writer
Heather O'Rourke, the young actress pulled into a supernatural vacuum in the "Poltergeist" movies, died because the doctors who treated her throughout her childhood failed to diagnose a long-standing obstruction of the small bowel that led to her death on Feb. 1, according to a wrongful-death suit filed Wednesday by a law firm representing the girl's mother. The 12-year-old actress, who warned, "They're heeere!" in "Poltergeist" and "They're baaack!"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2007 | Susan King, Times Staff Writer
"They're here." That phrase, uttered by the late child actress Heather O'Rourke in the horror classic "Poltergeist," has sent chills up moviegoers' spines for 25 years. And undoubtedly, they'll do it once more Thursday, as the Motion Picture Academy's Science and Technology Council presents a "Prime Tech" screening at the Linwood Dunn Theater in Hollywood.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1988 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
The sudden death last month of "Poltergeist III" child-star Heather O'Rourke brings MGM face to face with one of the toughest dilemmas any studio's movie marketers can expect to encounter. The second "Poltergeist" sequel was already in the can, at a cost of more than $10 million, when the 12-year-old actress died of what had seemed to be flu symptoms, but proved to be septic shock from an unsuspected bowel obstruction.
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Heather O'Rourke, the terrified youngster sucked into a spectral vacuum by supernatural spirits in the film "Poltergeist," is dead at the age of 12, it was learned today. The blonde ingenue, who finished filming "Poltergeist III" last summer, starring as Carol Ann Freeling for the third time, died Monday. The Associated Press said she had been pronounced dead at Children's Hospital in San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2001
If you like your terror with a slice of melody and a splash of dark humor, tune in for composer Stephen Sondheim's "Sweeney Todd in Concert: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street" (8 p.m. KCET, 9 p.m. KVCR), featuring George Hearn, Patti LuPone and the San Francisco Symphony and Chorus. SERIES John de Lancie, "Star Trek's" meddlesome "Q," brings considerably more menace to his guest spot on tonight's episode of the fantasy-horror series "Special Unit 2" (9 p.m. UPN).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1988 | MICHAEL CIEPLY, Times Staff Writer
The sudden death last month of "Poltergeist III" child-star Heather O'Rourke brings MGM face to face with one of the toughest dilemmas any studio's movie marketers can expect to encounter. The second "Poltergeist" sequel was already in the can, at a cost of more than $10 million, when the 12-year-old actress died of what had seemed to be flu symptoms, but proved to be septic shock from an unsuspected bowel obstruction.
NEWS
February 3, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Heather O'Rourke, the terrified youngster sucked into a spectral vacuum by supernatural spirits in the "Poltergeist" films, has died on an operating table at a San Diego hospital, it was reported Tuesday. The 12-year-old ingenue, who finished filming "Poltergeist III" last June in which she starred as the angelic Carol Ann Freeling for the third time, died late Monday afternoon.
NEWS
February 2, 1988 | BURT A. FOLKART, Times Staff Writer
Heather O'Rourke, the terrified youngster sucked into a spectral vacuum by supernatural spirits in the film "Poltergeist," is dead at the age of 12, it was learned today. The blonde ingenue, who finished filming "Poltergeist III" last summer, starring as Carol Ann Freeling for the third time, died Monday. The Associated Press said she had been pronounced dead at Children's Hospital in San Diego.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1987
Now that the Oscar race is officially off and chasing, we thought we'd take a final look at some of the more far-fetched Academy Award ad campaigns that were run in the trades as attempts to snare Oscar nominations. Among the critically unacclaimed works hyped were. . . . "The Money Pit" for best pic--with Tom Hanks for best actor and Shelley Long for best actress. "Pretty in Pink" for best pic--with its crop of teenies suggested for acting honors, and John Hughes for best screenplay.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
"Innocence is what you're given as a gift," Zelda Rubinstein chants fervently as she glides down glassy corridors in "Poltergeist III" as spook nemesis Tangina Barrons. "Everything else you have to fight for." You'd think anyone making movies like "Poltergeist III" (citywide)--second sequel to a 1982 box-office hit that didn't need even one sequel--would have abandoned innocence long ago. But it's nice to know sentiment survives packaging. Not much else does.
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