Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsHeather Woodbury
IN THE NEWS

Heather Woodbury

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2006 | Karen Wada, Special to The Times
HEATHER WOODBURY loves words. She loves how they sound and act, and all the ways we use and misuse them -- accents, drawls, grunge slang, radio rants. "For me, voices lead to the story," says the 42-year-old playwright/performer. "I just walk around a lot and I hear things that make me want to know more. I start off in a voice, and ask it to keep talking."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2008 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
Heather Woodbury has that gift common to all mesmerizing performance artists -- an ability to capture an audience's imagination as much with her story as her singularly flamboyant way of telling it. In her latest piece, "The Last Days of Desmond Nani Reese: A Stripper's History of the World," which runs Saturdays at Bang Studio Theatre, she channels the voices of two women who supposedly speak the same language but have great difficulty understanding each other.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2000 | PHILIP BRANDES
"It's important that we remember who we really are," cautions Violet, an aging patrician New Yorker, ruminating on her poodle's birthday party (and by extension, the passage of time itself). "No one else will." Performance artist Heather Woodbury aimed to stave off that slide into oblivion, chronicling the adventures of Violet and more than 100 other characters in "What Ever," her sweeping, eight-act solo epic.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2006 | Karen Wada, Special to The Times
HEATHER WOODBURY loves words. She loves how they sound and act, and all the ways we use and misuse them -- accents, drawls, grunge slang, radio rants. "For me, voices lead to the story," says the 42-year-old playwright/performer. "I just walk around a lot and I hear things that make me want to know more. I start off in a voice, and ask it to keep talking."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2008 | Charles McNulty, Times Staff Writer
Heather Woodbury has that gift common to all mesmerizing performance artists -- an ability to capture an audience's imagination as much with her story as her singularly flamboyant way of telling it. In her latest piece, "The Last Days of Desmond Nani Reese: A Stripper's History of the World," which runs Saturdays at Bang Studio Theatre, she channels the voices of two women who supposedly speak the same language but have great difficulty understanding each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2006 | Lynne Heffley
Fifteen local artists have been awarded 2006-07 City of Los Angeles Individual Artist Fellowships by the Department of Cultural Affairs. They are visual artists Paul J. Botello, Aya Dorit Cypis, Caryl Davis, Andrew Freeman, Clement S. Hanami, Ruben Ortiz-Torres, Coleen Sterritt, Lincoln Tobier, Carrie Ungerman and J. Michael Walker; literary arts honorees Diane Lefer and Luis Rodriguez; and performing artists Hector Aristizabal, Phil Ranelin and Heather Woodbury.
NEWS
December 17, 1998
THEATER Heather Woodbury performs "What Ever"--a solo "performance novel." Tonight at 2100 Square Feet in L.A. (213) 936-6818. COMEDY Revel in the rants of George Carlin. Tonight through Saturday at the Comedy Store in West Hollywood. (323) 656-6225. ART "Rodin's Monument to Victor Hugo" opens today at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 5905 Wilshire Blvd. in L.A. (213) 857-6000.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2008
It's 2014 in monologist Heather Woodbury's newest work, and a 108-year-old stripper has a lot to get off her chest. Inspired by a real life neighbor with a possibly shady past, "The Last Days of Desmond Nani Reese" debuted last year at Barnsdall Art Park as a matter of official city business -- Woodbury (pictured) won a grant from the Department of Cultural Affairs to commission the work.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1998
Museum "Inventing the Southwest: The Fred Harvey Company and Native American Art," an exhibition documenting the period between 1910 and 1940, ends Sunday at the Autry Museum of Western Heritage, 4700 Heritage Way. Through Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Adults, $7.50; senior citizens and students, $5; children 2-12, $3. (213) 667-2000. Family Knott's Berry Farm's 4th Annual Easter EggMazeMent of walk-through mazes and hands-on kids' activities ends Sunday. 8039 Beach Blvd., Buena Park. Maze hours, 11 a.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1998
Solo actors often portray multiple characters in their shows, but few if any match Heather Woodbury's total: In her much-lauded solo epic "What Ever, an American Odyssey in 8 Acts," performed over four evenings, Woodbury plays a whopping 100 characters. (Excerpts have been aired on National Public Radio's "This American Life.") * "What Ever, an American Odyssey in 8 Acts," 2100 Square Feet, 5615 San Vicente Blvd., Los Angeles, Thursdays-Sundays, 8 p.m. Ends April 19.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 8, 2000 | PHILIP BRANDES
"It's important that we remember who we really are," cautions Violet, an aging patrician New Yorker, ruminating on her poodle's birthday party (and by extension, the passage of time itself). "No one else will." Performance artist Heather Woodbury aimed to stave off that slide into oblivion, chronicling the adventures of Violet and more than 100 other characters in "What Ever," her sweeping, eight-act solo epic.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1998 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It sounds worthy of note in the Guinness Book of World Records--one woman wrote a 10-hour play with 100 characters, and she performs it all by herself, over four evenings. It's called "What Ever," subtitled "An American Odyssey in 8 Acts," now at 2100 Square Feet. Heather Woodbury displays remarkable gifts as both writer and monologuist. Her characters are varied and lively, and she plays them with consummate skill. Only one major problem: "What Ever" is too long.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
If an attractive member of the opposite sex with "kind of a timeless quality" came on to you at a hip New York party, would you wonder if this was one of the undead or just be pleasantly surprised? If the best sex of your life resulted, how much would it matter if you started feeling weaker and began noticing what look suspiciously like bite marks on your body? Would you assume the worst or just think your tired mind was playing odd little tricks on you?
Los Angeles Times Articles
|