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Heathers Movie

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March 23, 1989 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Riding shotgun, Winona Ryder kicked her feet up on the dashboard and pumped up the volume on KROQ-FM, ebulliently crooning to the Dead Milkmen's "Punk Rock Girl." It was time for her favorite pursuit--exploring abandoned houses. "Quick--turn right," she said abruptly as the car approached Sunset and Doheny, bumping along in heavy evening traffic. "It should be around here somewhere. The stories about this house sound incredible. I hear it's a great spooky old place."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1989 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Riding shotgun, Winona Ryder kicked her feet up on the dashboard and pumped up the volume on KROQ-FM, ebulliently crooning to the Dead Milkmen's "Punk Rock Girl." It was time for her favorite pursuit--exploring abandoned houses. "Quick--turn right," she said abruptly as the car approached Sunset and Doheny, bumping along in heavy evening traffic. "It should be around here somewhere. The stories about this house sound incredible. I hear it's a great spooky old place."
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
Warning: This is not "The Breakfast Club." First-time director Michael Lehmann's new film, "Heathers," is anything but a John Hughes imitation. Lehmann wants his piercing, comedic look at the dark side of teen-age angst to disturb and unnerve audiences. "I do want people to be a little shaken up," Lehmann confesses. But the 31-year-old director didn't intend to stir up public fears about teen-age suicide.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1989 | NINA J. EASTON, Times Staff Writer
Warning: This is not "The Breakfast Club." First-time director Michael Lehmann's new film, "Heathers," is anything but a John Hughes imitation. Lehmann wants his piercing, comedic look at the dark side of teen-age angst to disturb and unnerve audiences. "I do want people to be a little shaken up," Lehmann confesses. But the 31-year-old director didn't intend to stir up public fears about teen-age suicide.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn, Los Angeles Times
The summer after seventh grade, Danny Fleming and I spent an uninterrupted seven hours on the phone together -- our personal record. He had three-way calling, so we got some other people into the mix, but Danny and I were the constant. We watched the entire "Heathers" movie over the course of that phone call, and he might have read me a whole book of fart jokes too. Those were the days! But the epic teenage telephone call may be a thing of the past. A new report by the Pew Research Center's Internet and American Life Project has found that as the frequency of teenage texting continues to increase, teen use of the phone is on a significant downslide.
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