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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1988
A man who was walking along railroad tracks in Van Nuys on Tuesday while listening to heavy-metal music through earphones was hit by a train and killed, Los Angeles police said. Detectives said the 22-year-old man was listening to an Ozzy Osbourne tape when he was hit.
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NEWS
July 12, 2009 | Gerry Smith
The bullying seemed inescapable. Iain Steele's family and friends say it followed him from junior high to high school -- from hallways, where one tormentor shoved him into lockers, to cyberspace, where another posted a video on Facebook making fun of his taste for heavy metal music. "At one point, [a bully] had told [Iain] he wished he would kill himself," said Matt Sikora, Iain's close friend. Iain's parents know their son had other problems, but they think the harassment contributed to a deepening depression that hospitalized the 15-year-old twice this year.
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NEWS
October 19, 1988 | TAMARA JONES, Times Staff Writer
The moon, just out, hung over the Ozarks like a pale opal. Soon families would be saying grace over Sunday dinner; children would be clamoring to turn on the Christmas lights. It was time to go home. But in the darkening woods, four teen-agers lingered, enjoying the rush they always felt when they killed something. A kitten lay crumpled nearby. Sharing some unspoken secret, the boys exchanged furtive glances in the fading light. They were growing edgy.
NEWS
August 18, 2005 | Marc Weingarten, Special to The Times
WHEN KISS wiped off the makeup in the early 1980s, heavy metal's cartoon Gorgons rubbed away much of their mystique as well. Hence, the band's fans welcomed the reapplication of the greasepaint in the 1990s when the band embarked on a series of mega-bucks tours.
NEWS
February 10, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What the devil has gotten into the Egyptians? Devil-mania has been the order of the day in Cairo since police swooped into homes on the night of Jan. 22, rounding up scores of upper-class teenagers and young adults. The crime? They were accused of losing their religion and worshiping the devil.
SPORTS
January 3, 1995 | ERIK HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For many, music by such heavy-metal bands as Megadeath and Black Sabbath means one thing: teen-age rebellion. But for Jim Ambriz, the bands' songs serve as lightning rods, supplying the Saddleback High wrestler with an adrenaline overload. "Before I wrestle I pace back and forth. I've usually got Megadeath's 'Symphony of Destruction' or Sabbath's 'Iron Man' or 'Paranoid' playing in my head," Ambriz said. "Then I go out there (on the mat) and beat my opponent."
NEWS
October 20, 1988 | TAMARA JONES, Times Staff Writer
The "action"--as student body president Jim Hardy now calls the bludgeoning death of Steven Newberry--began to unfold with a casual conversation among seven classmates one September afternoon. Jim and his best friends, Pete Roland and Ron Clements, were there, and the talk, as usual, was about killing. But this time, it wasn't just the twisted fantasies of tough teen-agers fixated on drugs, acid rock and violence. This time, it would be self-fulfilling prophesy.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Roman Catholic priests have performed two exorcisms in New York recently to banish the devil, and Cardinal John J. O'Connor blames heavy-metal rock music for popularizing devil worship. O'Connor said in his Sunday sermon at St. Patrick's Cathedral that "as far as we know (the exorcisms) have been successful." O'Connor said heavy-metal music "can help trap people, especially teen-agers," into devil worship. "I think the industry had better police itself," O'Connor said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1986
What I have to say in this letter may come as a tremendous shock to Robert Hilburn, so I suggest that he sit down before he reads it. I am a teen-ager and I like heavy metal music. I also (and this may be hard to comprehend) enjoy groups like Berlin and Fleetwood Mac, and I love the works of Tchaikovsky, Beethoven and Mozart. I also like my parents, my teachers and I don't constantly leer at members of the opposite sex. Hilburn's attitude toward teen-agers and their music stinks.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1989 | JESS BRAVIN
Did Wally George narrowly avert a sinister end, plotted by drug-crazed, satanic heavy-metal musicians? Or did he simply wimp out? Either way, the abrasive Orange County talk show host refused to take the stage at Bogart's for his scheduled appearance Thursday night. According to the Long Beach club's management, he also walked off with his $1,500 fee for the show.
NEWS
July 21, 2005 | Marc Weingarten, Special to The Times
For 10 years, Ozzfest was every mega-decibel addict's one-stop shop for heavy metal music during the summer, a chance to experience the requisite banging of heads and the brandishing of devil's horns to the quarry-mining accompaniment of a handful of hard rock bands in a festival setting.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2005 | Randy Lewis
Could the critical rock 'n' roll question at concerts soon shift from "How ya doin' (insert city name here)?" to "Can you hear me now?" Don't laugh. In the ongoing search for ways to leave rock musicians and concert-going fans with happy memories instead of permanent hearing loss, the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland last week held an experimental "quiet concert" with, of all acts, the Eagles of Death Metal, the side project of Queens of the Stone Age frontman Josh Homme.
NATIONAL
December 10, 2004 | Sam Howe Verhovek, Geoff Boucher and P.J. Huffstutter, Times Staff Writers
Heavy-metal music fans gathered in a cold rain outside the Alrosa Villa nightclub Thursday as police and patrons reconstructed the rampage that had unfolded the night before. It left five people dead, including "Dimebag" Darrell Abbott -- a Grammy-nominated musician -- and the ex-Marine who jumped on stage and shot Abbott at least five times at point-blank range. Abbott, 38, had a huge following as the guitar hero of his original band, Pantera.
NEWS
October 3, 2002 | STEVE APPLEFORD
That is not his hair. The man called Ratchet is alone on stage for a moment, indulging in the mindless bliss and ego of a heavy metal guitar solo. The wig on his head looks like roadkill, long and frazzled and soaked in hairspray, but the leopard scarf across his forehead at least matches his spandex tights.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 2001 | LINA LECARO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Like the piercing pain in the gut that follows a heartbreaking loss, the dark, emotive sounds of Massachusetts metal quartet Staind stay with you long after you hear them. The band's soul-baring lyrics of isolation, anger and confusion are a huge part of its appeal, but it's Staind's ability to mesh infectious melodies with raw yet lustrous vocals and expressive guitar work that made its "Break the Cycle" one of the most anticipated rock albums of the year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2000 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a Friday night at Paladino's Lounge, and from the parking lot you can hear the ripping guitars of Chigger Redd cutting through a rendition of "Working Blues." Outside, heavy metal dudes with long hair and black leather pants and silver rings on their fingers queue up beside women in short skirts and halter tops. A muscular guy without a shirt on elbows his way past them into the club, carrying equipment, and another man walks past tuning a guitar.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 1990 | CHUCK PHILIPS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aunetta Roberson and Phyllis Vance lived in the same suburb for years. Their husbands frequented the same casinos. Their sons attended--and dropped out of--the same school. Outside of a few phone calls related to academic or legal problems their sons encountered, however, the women's lives rarely crossed. About the only thing they had in common was their mutual hatred for the loud heavy-metal music that their sons played for hours in the sons' rooms. Yet on Dec.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1987 | JAMES RAINEY, Times Staff Writer
There is an unwritten code of conduct, even in the bravura, super- macho world of heavy-metal music. And according to record company executive Bryn Bridenthal Housman, that code was broken last month by two members of the band Poison who doused her with beer and ice water at a post-concert party at the Forum in Inglewood. What some might have written off as just another skirmish in the world of heavy-metal, will not be forgiven easily by Housman. $1.
BUSINESS
November 29, 1999 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, P.J. Huffstutter covers high technology for The Times. She can be reached at (714) 966-7830 and at p.j.huffstutter@latimes.com
Who says computer guys don't rock? When hard-rock station KNAC was sold and became a Spanish-language station in 1995, Orange County fans of muscle-flexing power ballads and head-thrashing tunes were left hanging. Gone were the hard-livin', hard-playin' personalities like Long Paul, Nasty Neil and Eveready Ed. But thanks to the Internet, nothing ever truly dies. Online radio has been grabbing listeners, generating a lot of excitement and, said KNAC.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1999 | J.D. CONSIDINE, THE BALTIMORE SUN
To be perfectly honest, nobody in Drain sth is particularly happy with having to lug that little "sth" around. "Drain sth doesn't sound as nice as just Drain," says Flavia Canel, who plays guitar with the Swedish heavy rock quartet. "We thought Drain was perfect with our kind of music and our lyrics, because it's about, like, to empty yourself, empty your mind of your thoughts." Unfortunately for Canel and company, the name was already taken in America.
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