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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1996 | BARRY STAVRO
A San Fernando Valley business group has voted against recent recommendations by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to build a light-rail transit system, with enhanced bus service, across the east-west Valley corridor. Instead, the Valley Industry and Commerce Assn. favors building a heavy-rail line that would run from North Hollywood to the San Diego Freeway, between Burbank and Chandler boulevards.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
January 10, 1999
Re "Building the Pasadena Light-Rail Line," Jan. 4: Since the politicians, lobbyists, contractors, engineering firms and all the other special-interest groups insist on ramrodding an isolated light-rail trolley line to Pasadena down the throats of us taxpayers, it finally occurred to me what the true purpose of a mass transit project is all about. It isn't about constructing an efficient, well-planned transportation system that will be embraced by the traveling public. No, here in L.A., the true purpose of a mass transit project is to act as a taxpayer-supported cash cow that keeps the money flowing into the pockets of a small group of vested interest groups.
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OPINION
June 28, 1998
Re "Rail Supporters Giving a Push to Stalled Pasadena Project," June 22: When will the MTA and the residents and politicians of Pasadena quit playing "Alice in Transit-land"? Why do the taxpayers have to have a light-rail system ramrodded down their throats when another alternative makes so much more sense? The proposed "North" Blue Line (the one to Pasadena) won't even physically connect with the already-existing "South" Blue Line (the one to Long Beach). When it comes time for routine maintenance of the light-rail vehicles, are we going to truck them down to the repair shop in Carson?
OPINION
June 28, 1998
Re "Rail Supporters Giving a Push to Stalled Pasadena Project," June 22: When will the MTA and the residents and politicians of Pasadena quit playing "Alice in Transit-land"? Why do the taxpayers have to have a light-rail system ramrodded down their throats when another alternative makes so much more sense? The proposed "North" Blue Line (the one to Pasadena) won't even physically connect with the already-existing "South" Blue Line (the one to Long Beach). When it comes time for routine maintenance of the light-rail vehicles, are we going to truck them down to the repair shop in Carson?
OPINION
January 10, 1999
Re "Building the Pasadena Light-Rail Line," Jan. 4: Since the politicians, lobbyists, contractors, engineering firms and all the other special-interest groups insist on ramrodding an isolated light-rail trolley line to Pasadena down the throats of us taxpayers, it finally occurred to me what the true purpose of a mass transit project is all about. It isn't about constructing an efficient, well-planned transportation system that will be embraced by the traveling public. No, here in L.A., the true purpose of a mass transit project is to act as a taxpayer-supported cash cow that keeps the money flowing into the pockets of a small group of vested interest groups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1997
Re "Rail Critics Are Right--and Wrong," Commentary, Dec. 26: Rick Cole, a former mayor of Pasadena, and Katherine Perez, a member of Pasadena's Transportation Advisory Commission, apparently "forgot" to mention the prime reason why the Blue Line extension into their fair city is costing the taxpayers so much money. Could it possibly have something to do with Pasadena's insistence that the former Santa Fe rail line linking Pasadena with Los Angeles be converted from a "heavy" rail line (one that could have easily accommodated MetroLink trains two or three years ago)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1990
The idea of rail transportation in Southern California has been derailed many times by old-fashioned attitudes such as the ones expressed by William Fulton in his Opinion article ("Transit Rides the Rail Right-of-Way With Opportunistic Approach in L.A.," Oct. 21). One attitude is that Southern California is so spread out that only a handful of us will benefit from rail transit. Another is that many commuters can't--or won't--use rail transit regularly. Both of these attitudes are wrong.
NEWS
September 29, 1988
Pasadena's Transportation Commission has grave concerns with Senate Bill 2111 now before Gov. Deukmejian for approval or veto. This bill arbitrarily allocates 15% of Los Angeles County's rail transit funds to the San Fernando Valley for the eventual construction of light or heavy rail. This bill removes from the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission the authority to decide how best to allocate limited rail transit resources in our region. It therefore removes from that same agency the ability to fund those lines for which there is strong community support and strong traffic demands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1994 | GERALD A. SILVER and MYRNA L. SILVER, Gerald A. Silver and Myrna L. Silver live in Encino. Gerald Silver is president of Homeowners of Encino and is a member of the Transportation Summit, an advisory committee on Valley bus transportation
Public transportation agencies have allocated $500,000 for a major study designed to restructure bus service in the San Fernando Valley. It could not have come at a better time, because the much-publicized rail projects under way or under study will take decades to complete. Any solution to our transportation problems must recognize a fundamental reality: Transit in the Valley is a patchwork quilt. Thousands of jobs are intermixed with thousands of residents. This creates a vast crisscrossing of people going from home to work.
NEWS
March 21, 1986 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Urban Affairs Writer
With the opening of another 4.5-mile route Thursday, the San Diego Trolley consolidated its position as the most successful new "light rail" transit system in the nation. San Diego now has in place a 16-mile line running between downtown and the Mexican border, and the new East Line connecting downtown with predominantly minority neighborhoods in the southeastern part of the city. The two lines have been built for about $150 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1997
Re "Rail Critics Are Right--and Wrong," Commentary, Dec. 26: Rick Cole, a former mayor of Pasadena, and Katherine Perez, a member of Pasadena's Transportation Advisory Commission, apparently "forgot" to mention the prime reason why the Blue Line extension into their fair city is costing the taxpayers so much money. Could it possibly have something to do with Pasadena's insistence that the former Santa Fe rail line linking Pasadena with Los Angeles be converted from a "heavy" rail line (one that could have easily accommodated MetroLink trains two or three years ago)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1996 | BARRY STAVRO
A San Fernando Valley business group has voted against recent recommendations by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to build a light-rail transit system, with enhanced bus service, across the east-west Valley corridor. Instead, the Valley Industry and Commerce Assn. favors building a heavy-rail line that would run from North Hollywood to the San Diego Freeway, between Burbank and Chandler boulevards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1994 | GERALD A. SILVER and MYRNA L. SILVER, Gerald A. Silver and Myrna L. Silver live in Encino. Gerald Silver is president of Homeowners of Encino and is a member of the Transportation Summit, an advisory committee on Valley bus transportation
Public transportation agencies have allocated $500,000 for a major study designed to restructure bus service in the San Fernando Valley. It could not have come at a better time, because the much-publicized rail projects under way or under study will take decades to complete. Any solution to our transportation problems must recognize a fundamental reality: Transit in the Valley is a patchwork quilt. Thousands of jobs are intermixed with thousands of residents. This creates a vast crisscrossing of people going from home to work.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1990
The idea of rail transportation in Southern California has been derailed many times by old-fashioned attitudes such as the ones expressed by William Fulton in his Opinion article ("Transit Rides the Rail Right-of-Way With Opportunistic Approach in L.A.," Oct. 21). One attitude is that Southern California is so spread out that only a handful of us will benefit from rail transit. Another is that many commuters can't--or won't--use rail transit regularly. Both of these attitudes are wrong.
NEWS
September 29, 1988
Pasadena's Transportation Commission has grave concerns with Senate Bill 2111 now before Gov. Deukmejian for approval or veto. This bill arbitrarily allocates 15% of Los Angeles County's rail transit funds to the San Fernando Valley for the eventual construction of light or heavy rail. This bill removes from the Los Angeles County Transportation Commission the authority to decide how best to allocate limited rail transit resources in our region. It therefore removes from that same agency the ability to fund those lines for which there is strong community support and strong traffic demands.
NEWS
March 21, 1986 | WILLIAM TROMBLEY, Times Urban Affairs Writer
With the opening of another 4.5-mile route Thursday, the San Diego Trolley consolidated its position as the most successful new "light rail" transit system in the nation. San Diego now has in place a 16-mile line running between downtown and the Mexican border, and the new East Line connecting downtown with predominantly minority neighborhoods in the southeastern part of the city. The two lines have been built for about $150 million.
NEWS
February 2, 1986
A series of articles recently appeared in local newspapers regarding the impending traffic gridlock we can all expect in the near future in South Bay. The articles prompted me to reflect, and I realized that the warning signals being given to the public were not being adequately balanced with creative solutions. As a public official, I understand that we cannot afford to be lackadaisical, for if we continue with business as usual, all of our communities will be choked with traffic. Let us consider . . . the situation at hand.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 28, 1988
Former Los Angeles County Supervisor Baxter Ward, campaigning to regain his old post in the June 7 primary, on Wednesday accused county transportation officials of violating a voter-approved law by building light-rail systems such as the the Los Angeles-Long Beach and Century Freeway lines under construction.
NEWS
February 2, 1986
A series of articles recently appeared in local newspapers regarding the impending traffic gridlock we can all expect in the near future in South Bay. The articles prompted me to reflect, and I realized that the warning signals being given to the public were not being adequately balanced with creative solutions. As a public official, I understand that we cannot afford to be lackadaisical, for if we continue with business as usual, all of our communities will be choked with traffic. Let us consider . . . the situation at hand.
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