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Hector Hex Rios

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For weeks, the street had rumbled with rumors that "Slick" and "Hex" were headed for a showdown. On Friday, it erupted at an industrial, weed-choked site between the Levitz furniture warehouse and the Los Angeles River on the Glendale-Los Angeles border. At stake was nothing less than the title of graffiti king of Los Angeles. The battle--which lasts until sundown on Sunday and involves judges and hard-core partisans on both sides--will determine whose artwork rules the street.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1990 | DENISE HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For weeks, the street had rumbled with rumors that "Slick" and "Hex" were headed for a showdown. On Friday, it erupted at an industrial, weed-choked site between the Levitz furniture warehouse and the Los Angeles River on the Glendale-Los Angeles border. At stake was nothing less than the title of graffiti king of Los Angeles. The battle--which lasts until sundown on Sunday and involves judges and hard-core partisans on both sides--will determine whose artwork rules the street.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1990 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Michael Gold's mural is making him sick, and he's worried that it will have the same effect on his North Hollywood neighbors. Gold wants to educate people about the state of the environment, so he is having a colorful, six-part mural painted on the outside of his Riverton Avenue clothing factory. But a stark scene depicting a clear-cut forest littered with tree carcasses turned out to be so powerful that Gold said he stayed in bed for four days after it was completed recently.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | VICTOR MERINA, Times Staff Writer
For most graffiti artists, their typical canvasses are the blank walls, hideaway tunnels and freeway underpasses where they can work with one eye on the paint job and another on the lookout for police. Their usual audience is a mixture of fellow artists competing for work space and passing motorists and pedestrians, many of whom disdain the colorful artwork and blame them only for the gang signatures, nicknames and crude messages that share space with their street art.
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