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Hector Monsalve

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April 28, 1996 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Hector Monsalve, then a young, top-flight cyclist, competing for Colombia at the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne, Australia, was the crowning moment of his athletic career. "Being so far away on the other side of the world and seeing all those athletes from all the countries, that was impressive," Monsalve said. "It was wonderful just to compete." Forty years later, Monsalve again is linked to the Olympics. He is among those carrying the Olympic torch through the Southland this afternoon.
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SPORTS
April 28, 1996 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Hector Monsalve, then a young, top-flight cyclist, competing for Colombia at the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne, Australia, was the crowning moment of his athletic career. "Being so far away on the other side of the world and seeing all those athletes from all the countries, that was impressive," Monsalve said. "It was wonderful just to compete." Forty years later, Monsalve again is linked to the Olympics. He is among those carrying the Olympic torch through the Southland this afternoon.
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SPORTS
July 9, 1993 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everything was going smoothly for Hector Monsalve and his bicycle-riding friends during another 75 or so training miles through Valley streets on a Sunday morning. Then, as the group turned a corner in San Fernando, it happened. Quickly and without warning. The front tire on Monsalve's racing bike went flat, sending him crashing to the pavement on his right side. After his friends helped him up, Monsalve assessed the damage: The bike was fine; his right thigh was not. "I was going about 17 miles an hour and it was like somebody pulled the bike from under me," Monsalve said.
SPORTS
July 9, 1993 | FERNANDO DOMINGUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everything was going smoothly for Hector Monsalve and his bicycle-riding friends during another 75 or so training miles through Valley streets on a Sunday morning. Then, as the group turned a corner in San Fernando, it happened. Quickly and without warning. The front tire on Monsalve's racing bike went flat, sending him crashing to the pavement on his right side. After his friends helped him up, Monsalve assessed the damage: The bike was fine; his right thigh was not. "I was going about 17 miles an hour and it was like somebody pulled the bike from under me," Monsalve said.
SPORTS
September 20, 1990 | LAURA PALMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The waiting following the race Wednesday night was more nerve-racking for Joe Saling than the race itself. Just as the cyclists in the men's 50-plus points race of the Masters World Cup were taking their cool-down lap, the lights at the Velodrome went out, leaving the judges who were counting points searching for flashlights, and ultimately delaying the announcement of the winner. While he waited, Saling, of Bridgewater, N.J., computed his total and figured he should have enough for victory.
TRAVEL
December 17, 2000 | MIKE McINTYRE
There's a bowling alley at the end of the world. A movie theater too. Casinos, ice cream parlors, sporting goods stores, ATMs, Internet cafes, restaurants that serve whiskey and homemade chocolate. The end of the world has it all. Argentines call this harbor town of 44,000 the end of the world because it's the southernmost city on the planet. They don't care that several Chilean islands and Antarctica lie farther south.
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