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Hedy Burress

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August 24, 1996 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In early 1995, Hedy Burress was a typical college student just four months shy of graduation. What a difference a year can make. Burress literally came out of nowhere to land a starring role in the feature film "Foxfire," which opened Friday, and on the hit NBC sitcom "Boston Common." "My story is the story that every L.A. actor does not want to hear," says the 22-year-old Burress.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 24, 1996 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In early 1995, Hedy Burress was a typical college student just four months shy of graduation. What a difference a year can make. Burress literally came out of nowhere to land a starring role in the feature film "Foxfire," which opened Friday, and on the hit NBC sitcom "Boston Common." "My story is the story that every L.A. actor does not want to hear," says the 22-year-old Burress.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1996 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
What can you say about the comedy series "Boston Common"--getting a trial run on NBC--except there's not much to say? Nor to laugh about. Think of this as the Boston Hillbillies. The setting is the campus of a wee Boston college invaded by a sister and brother from small-town Virginia (read: Hicksville). And do they show those reserved New Englanders a thing or two.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2000 | ERNESTO LECHNER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A slickly produced movie about a homicidal screenwriter who specializes (surprise, surprise) in beautiful young women, USA Network's "Cabin by the Lake" has a nasty, generally unpleasant air about it. Stanley Caldwell (portrayed with cold efficiency by Judd Nelson) is your average Hollywood scribe: plain-looking, self-absorbed, obsessed with morbid thoughts of death and violence. But Caldwell takes the motto of "write what you know" a little too seriously.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1996 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
Who said girls just want to have fun? Sometimes, they just want to bond. And they want to bond just like guys. Which is what they're doing in a mini-rash of movies about young women and adolescent girls rebelling against their restrictive roles and kicking some deserving male butt while they're at it. Annette Haywood-Carter's "Foxfire," adapted from a Joyce Carol Oates novel and awkwardly transported from the '50s to the '90s, tells the story of four high school seniors in Portland, Ore.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2008 | Mindy Farabee
IN 2003, writer/actor David Landsberg got hit with a massive heart attack, one that brought him within 20 minutes of meeting the late David Landsberg. And he's making the most of it. "Now I can do anything I want, because I'm dying," he jokes. "This is my time to be an artist."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2004 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Good things came in threes at the Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle Awards ceremony. With the critics spreading the honors fairly evenly this year, three shows each won three awards, announced Sunday at the Coronet Theatre: Pacific Resident Theatre's revival of Tennessee Williams' "Orpheus Descending," the Mark Taper Forum's production of August Wilson's "Gem of the Ocean" and Powerhouse Theatre Company's premiere of the musical "The Shaggs: Philosophy of the World" at [Inside] the Ford.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2008 | David C. Nichols, Special to The Times
In a certain brand of commercial play, watching the formula stretch around itself is half the fun. That's the case with "An Act of Love" at the Falcon Theatre. David Landsberg's comedy about a newly divorced man and the women in his life is both familiar and original, and there lies its appeal. Meet Peter Sandusky (Timothy Hornor), an affably sarcastic insurance agent introduced mid-conversation with ne'er-do-well kid sister Julia (Hedy Burress).
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2003 | Rob Kendt, Special to The Times
Musical talent has been a ticket out of dreary small-town life ever since Bach packed up his clavier for the Weimar court. For the Shaggs, though, music was a chore, not a choice, and talent never entered into it. Needless to say, they didn't escape. Instead, the three New Hampshire teen girls made strange, terrible music to placate a tyrannical father and left it to posterity in a historic 1969 recording that's become a cult classic.
NEWS
August 10, 1997 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday "Diving With the Great Whales" / 6 p.m. TBS While Discovery scours the oceans for sharks, TBS goes in search of humpback whales, one of the species' most active creatures. Filmmaker Mitsuaki Iwago documents their feeding (a foraging effort of 12 whales known as "bubble netting") and "breeching," the awesome act in which they leap out of the water (some observers think it's done to remove parasites) and come crashing back to the surface. **** "Elvis Meets Nixon" / 9 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 1996 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anthony Clark--stand-up comic and now star of the 4-week-old NBC comedy hit "Boston Common"--is too busy to sit around and leisurely crack jokes . . . unless you ask. A product in part of his down-home upbringing near Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains, the 31-year-old, lanky, open-faced actor is unfailingly polite. He has but one hour to be interviewed and eat lunch, so when the paper-plate fare arrives--seared chicken legs, mashed potatoes with gravy, beans--Clark lets it sit.
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