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Heinrich Muller

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NEWS
February 26, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 50 years, Nazi hunters and historians have tried in vain to discover what happened to Gestapo chieftain Heinrich Muller, who vanished in 1945 at the end of World War II. Of all the major Nazis, Muller, who was Adolf Eichmann's immediate superior, is the most important still unaccounted for, according to numerous Holocaust experts. Now, efforts to solve the mystery are resurfacing, including attempts to answer the most provocative question of all: Was Muller briefly in U.S.
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NEWS
February 26, 2001 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 50 years, Nazi hunters and historians have tried in vain to discover what happened to Gestapo chieftain Heinrich Muller, who vanished in 1945 at the end of World War II. Of all the major Nazis, Muller, who was Adolf Eichmann's immediate superior, is the most important still unaccounted for, according to numerous Holocaust experts. Now, efforts to solve the mystery are resurfacing, including attempts to answer the most provocative question of all: Was Muller briefly in U.S.
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HOME & GARDEN
August 21, 1999 | RALPH KOVEL and TERRY KOVEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Collecting is a great way to remember your childhood, so it is not surprising that old, metal lunch boxes have become popular collectibles. The idea of a tin pail or box to hold a lunch is not new. In the late 1800s, products like tobacco were sold in tin containers with handles so they could be reused as lunch boxes. The boxes were decorated with ads for the product. In those days, many men took a lunch with them to their work in factories, fields or offices.
BOOKS
July 7, 2002 | MICHAEL FRANK, Michael Frank is a contributing writer to Book Review.
On a wintry morning in January 1942, 15 German bureaucrats, representatives of ministries responsible for the "Jewish question," repaired to a comfortable villa by a lake in Wannsee, a suburb southwest of Berlin where members of the German bourgeoisie had been summering since the late 19th century. The villa had a lake view, a music room and a billiards table and offered pleasant food, central heating and hot and cold running water. The men sat around a table for perhaps an hour and a half.
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