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Heinz Galinski

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NEWS
July 23, 1992
Heinz Galinski, 79, a leader of Germany's tiny postwar Jewish community who spoke against neo-Nazism with the authority of an Auschwitz survivor. In 1943, Galinski was deported to the Auschwitz concentration camp. He was transferred to Buchenwald and Bergen-Belsen, which was liberated just before World War II ended. Later, Galinski led Berlin's postwar community of a few thousand Jews. Galinski's father, a World War I veteran of the German army, died while under Gestapo arrest.
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NEWS
July 25, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a national television audience looked on, German leaders Friday paid their final respects to Heinz Galinski, the controversial leader of the country's tiny Jewish community. As the single most important individual in re-establishing Judaism in the land that unleashed the Holocaust, Galinski was a pivotal figure of post-World World War II German democracy.
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NEWS
July 25, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a national television audience looked on, German leaders Friday paid their final respects to Heinz Galinski, the controversial leader of the country's tiny Jewish community. As the single most important individual in re-establishing Judaism in the land that unleashed the Holocaust, Galinski was a pivotal figure of post-World World War II German democracy.
NEWS
July 23, 1992
Heinz Galinski, 79, a leader of Germany's tiny postwar Jewish community who spoke against neo-Nazism with the authority of an Auschwitz survivor. In 1943, Galinski was deported to the Auschwitz concentration camp. He was transferred to Buchenwald and Bergen-Belsen, which was liberated just before World War II ended. Later, Galinski led Berlin's postwar community of a few thousand Jews. Galinski's father, a World War I veteran of the German army, died while under Gestapo arrest.
NEWS
October 23, 1990 | Associated Press
The leader of Germany's Jewish community issued a strong protest Monday over a march on Saturday by several hundred neo-Nazis in the southeastern city of Dresden to protest the presence of Communists and foreigners in Germany. Heinz Galinski, chairman of the Central Council of Jews in Germany, said the march "overstepped . . . the patience of democratic forces."
NEWS
June 9, 1988
East Germany is prepared to give humanitarian aid to Jewish victims of the Holocaust, and talks are under way to work out details, the Foreign Ministry said in a statement. The announcement followed remarks earlier this week by West German Jewish leader Heinz Galinski that East Berlin is ready to pay $100 million in compensation.
NEWS
November 11, 1985 | Associated Press
Jews in West Germany gathered in synagogues Sunday to mark the 47th anniversary of Crystal Night, the Nazi regime's pogrom against Jews and their institutions. In West Berlin, Jewish community leader Heinz Galinski warned against the "suppression of history" and said Crystal Night is a "symbol of the horrors for the Jews in our more than 2,000-year history in this country." In the night from Nov. 9 to Nov.
NEWS
May 17, 1988 | Reuters
The former leader of West Germany's Jewish community embezzled more than $10 million from official funds intended for victims of Nazism, his successor said today. Heinz Galinski, head of the West German Jewish Central Council, said auditors were examining the community's books. Galinski said the missing sum was "double-digit and in the millions."
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | From Times Wire Service
The leader of West Germany's Jewish community, Heinz Galinski, said today that he fears a new rise of German nationalism, especially in East Berlin. In a speech to Jews in West Berlin reported by the East German state news agency ADN, Galinski also criticized West German firms that sold arms to countries hostile to Israel. Galinski said he will raise the nationalism issue with West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl.
NEWS
November 9, 1987 | From Reuters
The 49th anniversary of Nazi Germany's "Crystal Night" pogrom against Jews was observed in a memorial service on Sunday, with speakers lamenting the lack of resistance to the official anti-Semitism of the Hitler era. "There were only some reserved objections to the Jewish pogrom of Nov. 9-10, 1938. The planners of state terror against Jews could feel encouraged as a result," West Berlin Mayor Eberhard Diepgen said in a speech.
NEWS
June 12, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The industrial giant Daimler-Benz, which forced thousands of people into work programs to fuel the Nazi war effort, will pay nearly $12 million to the laborers and their families, the West German Red Cross said in a statement prepared for release today. Heinz Galinski, chairman of the West German Jewish Council, on Saturday welcomed news of the payment but said the company should have made reparations years ago. "To wait this long is a horrible betrayal of all those who suffered," Galinski said.
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