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Heiress

ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 1993 | RICHARD STAYTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If "Sunset Boulevard" had an opium-induced sequel, "Tarantula" would be it. Imagine Norma Desmond as a dime-store heiress, hiding in an island estate to write her memoirs after spending decades in an asylum. The demented heiress and B-movie star has snared two stud hustlers in her moneyed web. But there's an obstacle to the autobiography's completion: Opium addiction has eroded her brain. Now imagine Norma Desmond as portrayed by Tina Preston, one of L.A.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2002 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a young FBI agent in the mid-1970s, James Botting spent 18 months looking for Emily Harris and her fugitive band of Symbionese Liberation Army terrorists. Roaming the country, he kept her wanted poster in his briefcase and her face--bright, blue-eyed, imperious--ever present in his mind. Twenty-five years later, when it no longer mattered, he found her. By that time, Botting had left the FBI and become head of security for MGM Studios in Santa Monica.
NEWS
March 17, 2000 | From Associated Press
The husband of a DuPont family heiress was sentenced Thursday to more than 16 years in prison for his role in the contract killing of a former prostitute who became a family nemesis. "To this day, I don't know why I did what I did," Christopher Moseley told U.S. District Judge Justin Quackenbush. "But I do know Patricia Margello is dead, and I'm responsible for that." Moseley and three others were charged in the Aug. 2, 1998 death of Margello in a seedy motel near the Las Vegas Strip.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2003 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
A judge sentenced four graying former soldiers of the radical Symbionese Liberation Army to prison Friday for killing a mother of four in a botched 1975 bank robbery, ending a quarter-century quest for justice in a case that was once deemed impossible to resolve. After the grown son of Myrna Opsahl derided the SLA as a group of "pathetic, deranged revolutionaries," Superior Court Judge Thomas Cecil sentenced the foursome to terms ranging from six to eight years for second-degree murder.
NEWS
August 28, 1994 | SHARON COHEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It is portrayed as a conspiracy of the rich and infamous--a network of riders, trainers, owners and veterinarians who concocted a vicious plot to kill horses to collect insurance. The same people who pampered horses, picking up silver cups and blue ribbons along the exclusive riding circuit here and abroad, now stand accused of playing a role in the cruelest crimes: electrocuting, starving, even allowing animals to be burned alive.
NEWS
October 31, 1985 | From Reuters
Marchioness Isabella Guglielmi, an Italian noblewoman kidnaped by armed men four months ago, was freed late Tuesday night on a roadside near this northern Italian city, police reported Wednesday. According to Italian press reports, her relatives paid a ransom of $1.12 million about two weeks ago.
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | JON MATSUMOTO
Catherine Sloper, the center of William Wyler's sensitive and enduring 1949 film, "The Heiress," is the type of character that haunts you like the sight of a lost puppy searching futilely for home. Catherine is surely one of cinema's most memorable and heartbreaking doormats. She is a turn-of-the-century spinster and the sole heir to her father's vast estate. But despite the best schooling, she is also bereft of the type of charm, grace and intelligence expected of a woman of her class.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Polly Lauder Tunney, 100, the Carnegie Steel Co. heiress whose marriage to heavyweight boxing champion Gene Tunney made international headlines in 1928, died Saturday at her home in Stamford, Conn., her family said. Mary "Polly" Lauder was 21 when she married Tunney in Italy a year after he successfully defended his heavyweight boxing title against Jack Dempsey in the famous "long count" fight in Chicago.
IMAGE
October 14, 2007 | Adam Tschorn, Times Staff Writer
If Los Angeles fashion week has one face, it might belong to Caroline D'Amore. Over the course of her career, the 23-year-old has walked hundreds of runway shows in this town -- sometimes up to 14 a week -- and left an impression that's hard to ignore. At 5-foot-9, with a mane of shoulder-length brown hair, D'Amore is recognizable even to those who've never heard her name. Her distinctive gait -- catch it tomorrow night at the Heatherette show and at the Jenny Han show on Tuesday -- has helped.
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