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Helen Greenblatt

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NEWS
November 22, 1998 | BONNIE HARRIS HAYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He spent three hours choosing the perfect bouquet to give his date, a charming gesture that made him half an hour late picking her up. He worried all evening about kissing her good night. He felt clumsy. Nauseated. Silly. He's 73, on his first date in seven years, and undergoing a resurrection of the senses that seems to be pervading his generation as never before.
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NEWS
November 22, 1998 | BONNIE HARRIS HAYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He spent three hours choosing the perfect bouquet to give his date, a charming gesture that made him half an hour late picking her up. He worried all evening about kissing her good night. He felt clumsy. Nauseated. Silly. He's 73, on his first date in seven years, and undergoing a resurrection of the senses that seems to be pervading his generation as never before.
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NEWS
November 27, 1991 | SHERRY ANGEL
Some older workers feel self-conscious and lack confidence because they're afraid they won't be able to keep up with their younger co-workers, notes Helen Greenblatt, a 70-year-old Laguna Hills psychotherapist. However, she adds, many older workers are just as quick as everyone else, and those who need a bit more time to complete tasks shouldn't worry about it. "The younger boss doesn't hire an older worker for speed," Greenblatt says.
NEWS
August 1, 1990 | SHERRY ANGEL
Loneliness in old age is a pain no matter where you live, but it's particularly difficult for Orange County seniors because "most people come from someplace else and neighborhoods keep changing," says Shirley Cohen, executive director of the Feedback Foundation. And even stable neighborhoods are often empty because it takes two incomes to support a household in this high-priced housing market.
NEWS
November 30, 1993 | SHERRY ANGEL
When Gary Risner is in top form, he's able to work 70 hours a week and come home between his day job as an advertising salesman and his night job as a disc jockey with enough energy to cook dinner and provide good company for his wife, Erin. "When I'm well," he says, "I'm as nice as can be." But when Gary has the flu, he's a different person.
NEWS
December 26, 1990 | SHERRY ANGEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
You refuse to drive anywhere on New Year's Eve and you're so burned out on holiday cheer by then that you'd rather not invite anyone to your place, so you are settling in for a quiet evening at home. If you're like many other New Year's Eve couch potatoes, you'll probably end up falling asleep in front of the tube long before the countdown in Times Square reaches your living room. You'll greet 1991 in the morning, just in time for the first kickoff.
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