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Helen Irlen

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1991 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Fernando High School students who for years had trouble reading anything more complicated than the TV guide without falling asleep or getting headaches say they can now read textbooks for hours with no problem. Their teacher, reading specialist Jerry Spitz, says colored sheets of plastic placed over the printed page have solved a host of longtime reading problems, such as words that look blurry or seem to move off the page.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1991 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
San Fernando High School students who for years had trouble reading anything more complicated than the TV guide without falling asleep or getting headaches say they can now read textbooks for hours with no problem. Their teacher, reading specialist Jerry Spitz, says colored sheets of plastic placed over the printed page have solved a host of longtime reading problems, such as words that look blurry or seem to move off the page.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1997 | ANDY ROSE
Police were looking for two young men Tuesday in connection with an attempted robbery of a woman in her room at the Pierpont Hotel. The two men confronted Helen Irlen of Long Beach shortly after 7 p.m. Monday. They choked her and knocked her to the floor of the room, but then ran out when a friend of Irlen's walked in, Ventura police said. Irlen, whose age wasn't available, was treated for neck pain at Ventura County Medical Center and released. The suspects were described as about 18 years old.
NEWS
December 14, 1990 | SUE MILLER, THE BALTIMORE EVENING SUN
Colored plastic overlays--particularly blue and gray--used on books can produce immediate and dramatic effects on the reading performance of children who are specifically reading-disabled, or dyslexic, says a University of New Orleans researcher. "About 70% of the disabled readers we encounter have specific visual defects, and about 80% of this group respond to this simple and inexpensive intervention," said Mary C.
NEWS
December 3, 1996 | LESLIE KNOWLTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Back in the '60s, life was as easy as 1-2-3. The only number I had to remember was my telephone number. Today, our heads must store multiple and ever-changing strings of digits to access everything from computers to cash. Forget them and your entire world seizes. At last count I had 22 personal identification numbers (PINs), passwords, log-ons and identification codes to manage.
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