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Helen Joseph

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NEWS
December 26, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen Joseph, one of South Africa's earliest white campaigners against apartheid, a longtime confidant of Nelson and Winnie Mandela, and the first person placed under house arrest in this divided country, died here Friday at age 87. Mrs. Joseph, a militant former labor leader, battled successive white-minority governments for more than 40 years and suffered some of Pretoria's most onerous restrictions.
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NEWS
December 26, 1992 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen Joseph, one of South Africa's earliest white campaigners against apartheid, a longtime confidant of Nelson and Winnie Mandela, and the first person placed under house arrest in this divided country, died here Friday at age 87. Mrs. Joseph, a militant former labor leader, battled successive white-minority governments for more than 40 years and suffered some of Pretoria's most onerous restrictions.
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NEWS
December 22, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Jailed black leader Nelson R. Mandela held an emotional reunion Thursday with an 84-year-old white woman who was his co-defendant in a landmark anti-apartheid trial 28 years ago. Helen Joseph, who in the 1960s was one of the first whites banned by the government, spent four hours with Mandela in Victor Verster Prison near Cape Town. "He was in very good form, full of jokes, full of laughter," Joseph said outside the prison gate.
NEWS
December 22, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Jailed black leader Nelson R. Mandela held an emotional reunion Thursday with an 84-year-old white woman who was his co-defendant in a landmark anti-apartheid trial 28 years ago. Helen Joseph, who in the 1960s was one of the first whites banned by the government, spent four hours with Mandela in Victor Verster Prison near Cape Town. "He was in very good form, full of jokes, full of laughter," Joseph said outside the prison gate.
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
President Nelson Mandela was among thousands of mourners who filed past the flag-draped coffin of Joe Slovo in a state funeral Sunday for the African National Congress and Communist Party leader. The Lithuanian-born Slovo, who died of cancer Jan. 6 at the age of 68, lived to see his dream of democracy come true with South Africa's historic all-race elections last April.
NEWS
November 26, 1986 | Associated Press
Activist Helen Joseph, often described as the grandmother of the anti-apartheid movement, said today that the government refused her a passport to travel to the United States to accept a human rights award. Joseph, 81, said the Home Affairs Ministry informed her by telephone of the refusal but did not explain its action. The ministry today confirmed that the passport was denied.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1997 | ESTHER SCHRADER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 44-year-old woman confessed to shooting her mother, 82, Saturday night in her bed in the townhouse the two shared, police said. The woman, who identified herself to police only as "Liki," surrendered outside her home in the 2700 block of Monza about 6:45 p.m. as paramedics rushed inside to aid her mother, Helen Ben Joseph, who was shot twice in the abdomen, Tustin police Sgt. Steve Lewis said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1990 | G. JEANETTE AVENT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A memorial service will be held Saturday for a Del Mar couple lost on a scuba diving excursion New Year's Day in Mexico's Gulf of California. Joseph Thornton Ream Jr., 63, and Janet Gay Ream, 56, were among 14 people, including nine other U.S. citizens, reported missing after the chartered boat they were on was swamped by a large wave in rough seas.
NEWS
February 4, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Activists silenced for years by government "listings" and emergency restrictions tested their voices Saturday as tens of thousands of blacks welcomed South Africa's lifting of bans on political groups with peaceful marches in three cities. At the same time, the African National Congress, the principal anti-apartheid organization legalized by President Frederik W. de Klerk on Friday, reiterated its oft-stated position that it will not unilaterally halt its guerrilla war against Pretoria.
NEWS
February 6, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here are some questions and answers about the changes occurring in South Africa in recent days: Question: What is the most important action President Frederik W. de Klerk has taken? Answer: His most significant move has been to lift a 30-year-old government ban on the African National Congress, the primary guerrilla group fighting white minority-led rule in South Africa.
OPINION
August 13, 1989 | Charlene Smith, Charlene Smith is a South African journalist
South Africa, it could be said, is being run by two governments. The first is the white-minority Nationalist government in Pretoria; the second is the banned African National Congress in Lusaka, Zambia. Neither recognizes the other--officially. But neither can advance without the other, and any setback either suffers is a consequence of actions by the other. The majority of black South Africans are loyal to the exiled ANC and monitor instructions issued by the organization from Lusaka.
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
A bespectacled anthropologist, David Webster, concluded a recent paper on repression in South Africa by singling out the "steady tempo" of anti-apartheid activists slain by right-wing death squads. Webster said these clandestine groups control government opponents by assassination after official methods, such as detention, have failed. "It is a very rare event indeed when such assassinations are ever solved," he added. On Saturday, before that paper could even be published, about 5,000 white and black South Africans marched through Johannesburg's white suburbs to bury Webster, himself a victim of an assassination squad.
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