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Helen Keller

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NEWS
June 27, 1985 | United Press International
President Reagan on Wednesday signed a congressional resolution designating this week as "Helen Keller Deaf-Blind Awareness Week."
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2009
"The Mystery of the Missing Tooth" William H. Hooks Kara was sad. She did not smile like everyone. Everyone else had a cool gap in their mouths. At show and tell, everybody showed what the tooth fairy brought them. Sue said she got a book. Jim got money. Tanya got Markers. Kara told about her baby brother. She said he had no teeth at all. She checked her teeth. Nothing wiggled. She thought maybe the tooth fairy forgot her. Kara ran in a sack race and then her tooth was gone.
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NATIONAL
October 8, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Helen Keller beat out a moon rocket, a Cherokee chief and other symbols for a spot on the state quarter. It will be the first U.S. coin in circulation to include Braille. The design unveiled by Gov. Donald Siegelman includes an image of Keller, an Alabama native who overcame blindness and deafness to become a writer and educator, reading a book in Braille. Including the slogan "Spirit of Courage," the quarter is intended to draw attention to education. The U.S.
NATIONAL
March 6, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Researchers have uncovered a rare photograph of a young Helen Keller with her teacher Anne Sullivan, nearly 120 years after it was taken on Cape Cod, Mass., and tucked inside a family album. The photograph, shot in July 1888 in Brewster, shows an 8-year-old Keller sitting outside in a light-colored dress, holding Sullivan's hand and cradling one of her beloved dolls.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2003 | Nara Schoenberg, Chicago Tribune
On the 100th anniversary of its publication, Helen Keller's "The Story of My Life" would appear to be the book that has everything: a university tribute, a New Yorker article and a deluxe Web edition, scheduled to go online this fall. In honor of the big event, two handsome new "restored" print editions, each at least 400 pages long, are on bookstore shelves. And yet something is missing as Keller's most famous book embarks on its second century.
NEWS
August 19, 1998 | SUSIE LINFIELD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Helen Keller's life story can be called, without irony, "inspiring," and Dorothy Herrmann's new biography is a competent explication of that story. But in "Helen Keller: A Life," Herrmann attempts something more than a conventional biography; instead, she embarks on a psychological excavation of Keller.
NATIONAL
March 6, 2008 | From the Associated Press
Researchers have uncovered a rare photograph of a young Helen Keller with her teacher Anne Sullivan, nearly 120 years after it was taken on Cape Cod, Mass., and tucked inside a family album. The photograph, shot in July 1888 in Brewster, shows an 8-year-old Keller sitting outside in a light-colored dress, holding Sullivan's hand and cradling one of her beloved dolls.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1998
Ever ask what became of Helen Keller and her mentor Annie Sullivan? CBS' "Monday After the Miracle" movie answers the question.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The first U.S. circulating coin with Braille markings was unveiled -- a quarter honoring Helen Keller, a pioneer for the rights of the disabled who overcame blindness and deafness. The coin includes a picture of Keller, who died in 1968, with her name in text and Braille, the writing system for the blind.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2009
"The Mystery of the Missing Tooth" William H. Hooks Kara was sad. She did not smile like everyone. Everyone else had a cool gap in their mouths. At show and tell, everybody showed what the tooth fairy brought them. Sue said she got a book. Jim got money. Tanya got Markers. Kara told about her baby brother. She said he had no teeth at all. She checked her teeth. Nothing wiggled. She thought maybe the tooth fairy forgot her. Kara ran in a sack race and then her tooth was gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2003 | Nara Schoenberg, Chicago Tribune
On the 100th anniversary of its publication, Helen Keller's "The Story of My Life" would appear to be the book that has everything: a university tribute, a New Yorker article and a deluxe Web edition, scheduled to go online this fall. In honor of the big event, two handsome new "restored" print editions, each at least 400 pages long, are on bookstore shelves. And yet something is missing as Keller's most famous book embarks on its second century.
BOOKS
May 4, 2003 | Merle Rubin, Merle Rubin is a contributing writer to Book Review.
The Story of My Life The Restored Classic 1903-2003 Helen Keller With supplementary accounts by Anne Sullivan, her teacher, and John Macy Edited by Roger Shattuck with Dorothy Hermann W.W. Norton: 352 pp., $24.95 * Mark Twain, certainly not one to indulge in sugary sentiment, declared that the two most interesting characters of the 19th century were Napoleon Bonaparte and Helen Keller.
NATIONAL
March 25, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The first U.S. circulating coin with Braille markings was unveiled -- a quarter honoring Helen Keller, a pioneer for the rights of the disabled who overcame blindness and deafness. The coin includes a picture of Keller, who died in 1968, with her name in text and Braille, the writing system for the blind.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Helen Keller beat out a moon rocket, a Cherokee chief and other symbols for a spot on the state quarter. It will be the first U.S. coin in circulation to include Braille. The design unveiled by Gov. Donald Siegelman includes an image of Keller, an Alabama native who overcame blindness and deafness to become a writer and educator, reading a book in Braille. Including the slogan "Spirit of Courage," the quarter is intended to draw attention to education. The U.S.
TRAVEL
May 19, 2002 | ELLEN MELINKOFF
The focal point of the Helen Keller Festival, June 27 to 30, will be Ivy Green, Keller's home in Tuscumbia, Ala. To honor the remarkable woman who was blind and deaf, there will be an antique car show, a parade, an arts and crafts show, concerts and a puppet show. Festival-goers can tour the home and visit the pump where Keller learned her first word. For information, contact Colbert County Tourism, P.O. Box 740425, Tuscumbia, AL 35674; (800) 344-0783, www.helenkellerfestival.com.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2001 | RICHARD KAHLENBERG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Each of the leading actors in the Pierce College Theatre Department's presentation of "The Miracle Worker" this weekend brings something special to his role, including the golden retriever who plays Belle, the dog of the young heroine Helen Keller. Belle will be played by a trained seeing eye dog whose real name is Sierra.
BOOKS
May 4, 2003 | Merle Rubin, Merle Rubin is a contributing writer to Book Review.
The Story of My Life The Restored Classic 1903-2003 Helen Keller With supplementary accounts by Anne Sullivan, her teacher, and John Macy Edited by Roger Shattuck with Dorothy Hermann W.W. Norton: 352 pp., $24.95 * Mark Twain, certainly not one to indulge in sugary sentiment, declared that the two most interesting characters of the 19th century were Napoleon Bonaparte and Helen Keller.
NEWS
November 15, 1998 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The classic play and film, "The Miracle Worker," movingly dramatized teacher Annie Sullivan's remarkable efforts to communicate with and educate a 7-year-old blind, deaf and mute girl named Helen Keller. The CBS movie, "Monday After the Miracle," based on playwright William Gibson's sequel to "Miracle Worker," picks up Keller and Sullivan's inspirational story 13 years later. Keller (Moira Kelly) is now a 20-year-old Radcliffe College student.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 1998
Ever ask what became of Helen Keller and her mentor Annie Sullivan? CBS' "Monday After the Miracle" movie answers the question.
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