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Helen Shanbrom

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1996
Re "Gunning for Speeders," April 4: Speeding is the primary cause of all motor vehicle collisions (according to the CHP annual report). Perhaps the noble efforts of watchdog groups like the residents of Beverly Glen Canyon would not be necessary if California would permit the CHP to use radar devices to catch speeders. HELEN SHANBROM Santa Ana
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1996
Re "Gunning for Speeders," April 4: Speeding is the primary cause of all motor vehicle collisions (according to the CHP annual report). Perhaps the noble efforts of watchdog groups like the residents of Beverly Glen Canyon would not be necessary if California would permit the CHP to use radar devices to catch speeders. HELEN SHANBROM Santa Ana
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1988
This is in reply to the letters, "Accident Victims and Seat Belts" (Jan. 3) and the tragic death of Samantha Bass, "Not Just Another Freeway Fatality" (Dec. 21). This article does a great service in pointing out the fallacies of the justice system. In the prime of life and engaged to be married, my son's life was violently ended. A driver speeding recklessly in a truck with faulty brakes struck his car with no warning. He had no chance. "Cause of Death: Blunt Force." My son was wearing a seat belt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1991
Sometimes the banality of Orange County journalism overwhelms! It is so boring to read newspaper evaluations on how "conservative" our legislators are, rather than how "representative" they are. Such commentaries have reached a new nadir concerning Sen. John Seymour. No reporter has mentioned the many awards Seymour has received. In 1990 the California Journal gave him one of the highest ratings as a legislator. He was honored by the California School Board Assn. as Legislator of the Year in 1988, and recognized by the Orange County Teachers Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1988
We are pleased to see that the Orange County Transportation Committee plans to study further the possibility of limiting trucks on our freeways to ease traffic congestion (March 10). This is a very critical truck safety measure as well, since it would help to minimize the number of truck-related accidents. Truck-involved collisions killed 678 people in California in 1986. This is an increase of 40.2% since 1982, according to California Highway Patrol statistics. By reducing the number of trucks at peak traffic hours we are making our freeways safer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1990
Re "Battle Cry Echoes in Canyons" (June 23): It is the year 2010 and there are now 5 million to 7 million new residents in Southern California, 400,000 in Orange County. My grandchildren ask, "What is a canyon? Can we go see one?" We look up canyon in the dictionary: "can-yon (n), A deep valley with steep sides often with a stream flowing through." But we cannot drive or hike through any in Orange County because they are all housing developments now. If a bond issue is the only way to save our canyons for future generations, then government intervention is necessary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1990
Perhaps readers will be interested in the following California highway fines: Car-pool lanes: $246. Littering: $150 to $1,000. Gridlock: $150 to $500. In 1988, there were 639 people killed and 17,166 injured in truck-involved accidents in California. The fine for truck drivers caught going 10 miles over the posted speed limit is now $200. The maximum fine for speeding truckers is $300. According to the California Highway Patrol, speed has consistently been the major cause of truck-involved fatal and injury accidents where truck drivers were at fault.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1991
Sometimes the banality of Orange County journalism overwhelms! It is so boring to read newspaper evaluations on how "conservative" our legislators are, rather than how "representative" they are. Such commentaries have reached a new nadir concerning Sen. John Seymour. No reporter has mentioned the many awards Seymour has received. In 1990 the California Journal gave him one of the highest ratings as a legislator. He was honored by the California School Board Assn. as Legislator of the Year in 1988, and recognized by the Orange County Teachers Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1989
Re "Truck Crash Prompts Call for Routine Inspections" (Dec. 24): Rather than "a natural prejudice toward trucks," as stated by Sheriffs Lt. George Johnson, a natural fear toward trucks would be a better choice of words. Readers may be interested to know that, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation, one of every three tractor-trailers can be expected to crash in a year. Nationally, federal statistics indicate that the involvement of heavy trucks in fatal crashes continues to be much higher than that of passenger cars when mileage is taken into account.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1990
Re "Battle Cry Echoes in Canyons" (June 23): It is the year 2010 and there are now 5 million to 7 million new residents in Southern California, 400,000 in Orange County. My grandchildren ask, "What is a canyon? Can we go see one?" We look up canyon in the dictionary: "can-yon (n), A deep valley with steep sides often with a stream flowing through." But we cannot drive or hike through any in Orange County because they are all housing developments now. If a bond issue is the only way to save our canyons for future generations, then government intervention is necessary.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 1990
Perhaps readers will be interested in the following California highway fines: Car-pool lanes: $246. Littering: $150 to $1,000. Gridlock: $150 to $500. In 1988, there were 639 people killed and 17,166 injured in truck-involved accidents in California. The fine for truck drivers caught going 10 miles over the posted speed limit is now $200. The maximum fine for speeding truckers is $300. According to the California Highway Patrol, speed has consistently been the major cause of truck-involved fatal and injury accidents where truck drivers were at fault.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1989
Re "Truck Crash Prompts Call for Routine Inspections" (Dec. 24): Rather than "a natural prejudice toward trucks," as stated by Sheriffs Lt. George Johnson, a natural fear toward trucks would be a better choice of words. Readers may be interested to know that, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation, one of every three tractor-trailers can be expected to crash in a year. Nationally, federal statistics indicate that the involvement of heavy trucks in fatal crashes continues to be much higher than that of passenger cars when mileage is taken into account.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1988
We are pleased to see that the Orange County Transportation Committee plans to study further the possibility of limiting trucks on our freeways to ease traffic congestion (March 10). This is a very critical truck safety measure as well, since it would help to minimize the number of truck-related accidents. Truck-involved collisions killed 678 people in California in 1986. This is an increase of 40.2% since 1982, according to California Highway Patrol statistics. By reducing the number of trucks at peak traffic hours we are making our freeways safer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1988
This is in reply to the letters, "Accident Victims and Seat Belts" (Jan. 3) and the tragic death of Samantha Bass, "Not Just Another Freeway Fatality" (Dec. 21). This article does a great service in pointing out the fallacies of the justice system. In the prime of life and engaged to be married, my son's life was violently ended. A driver speeding recklessly in a truck with faulty brakes struck his car with no warning. He had no chance. "Cause of Death: Blunt Force." My son was wearing a seat belt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1999
New signs up at dangerous Santa Ana Freeway interchanges are not going to prevent trucks or cars from crashing into each other (April 2). A larger speed-limit sign installed by Caltrans will not change the fact that truck drivers require a longer stopping distance to control their vehicle, especially if the driver is exceeding the speed limit. The Santa Ana and Riverside freeways interchange is simply too dangerous for a big rig to negotiate safely. Has anyone at Caltrans thought of rerouting trucks until construction is completed?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 2001
Re "Runaway Rig Crashes; 1 Dead, 6 Hurt" (March 9): According to the CHP report, the primary collision factor where truck drivers are at fault has spread. In 1999 there were 36 people killed and 2,595 injured in truck-at-fault collisions in California. In 1986, our 27-year-old son was killed by a speeding tractor-trailer operating below maintenance standards, with no logbook. Nothing has changed. HELEN SHANBROM Citizens for Reliable & Safe Highways Santa Ana
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