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Helen Wills Moody

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SPORTS
June 26, 1988 | Lisa Dillman
Whether or not Martina Navratilova wins an unprecedented ninth Wimbledon singles title Saturday, her quest has served to re-focus attention on the 82-year-old co-holder of the record, Helen Wills Moody Roark.
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SPORTS
December 26, 2013 | Wire Reports
Serena Williams nearly owned women's tennis in 2013, and the Associated Press took notice by selecting her the female athlete of the year. Williams has won the award three times, tying golfer Annika Sorenstam and tennis player Maureen Connolly. Only track and golf star Babe Didrikson (6) and tennis star Chris Evert (4) have more selections since the award was first given in 1931. Williams was a runaway winner in voting by the media, garnering 55 of 96 votes. Women's basketball player Brittney Griner was second with 14 votes.
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NEWS
January 3, 1998 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen Wills Moody, an eight-time Wimbledon champion whose name is evocative of tennis' elegant golden age, has died in Carmel. She was 92. In failing health in recent years, Moody died Thursday at Carmel Convalescent Hospital. Her on-court stoicism, which earned her the nickname "Little Miss Poker Face," gave Moody a tactical advantage during a time when the game had a more genteel atmosphere.
SPORTS
July 16, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Jennifer Capriati was inducted into the Tennis Hall of Fame on Saturday, capping an excellent career during which she won three Grand Slam singles titles (the 2001 and 2002 Australian Open and the 2001 French Open). While Capriati is a worthy addition to the Hall of Fame, not many, if any at all, would consider her the greatest women's tennis player of all time. So, who is? Below is a list of candidates for your consideration. Please look them over and vote in our poll to determine the greatest women's tennis player of all time.
SPORTS
November 6, 2000
Female athletes with notable consecutive-victory streaks: 1. Grete Waitz won five consecutive New York City Marathons. 2. Sonja Henie won 10 consecutive world figure skating championships. 3. Nancy Lopez won five consecutive LPGA events. 4. Peggy Fleming won five consecutive U.S. figure skating titles. 5. Patty Sheehan won four consecutive Nevada Amateur golf titles. 6. Helen Wills Moody did not lose a match for 10 years. (Note: During the 10 years, Wills Moody did not lose a set.
SPORTS
June 8, 1997 | BUD COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sixty-seven years ago Helen Jacobs chased Helen Wills Moody across the Atlantic to the French Championships. They were the two Helens whose exploits were American sports page staples during the 1920s and '30s, when they were known as The Rivals. The confrontations between Moody and Jacobs, though not so frequent, drew as much attention as the latter-day Chris Evert-Martina Navratilova serial. Seven of them came in major finals, four at Wimbledon, and Jacobs won only one, the U.S. final of 1933.
SPORTS
July 16, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Jennifer Capriati was inducted into the Tennis Hall of Fame on Saturday, capping an excellent career during which she won three Grand Slam singles titles (the 2001 and 2002 Australian Open and the 2001 French Open). While Capriati is a worthy addition to the Hall of Fame, not many, if any at all, would consider her the greatest women's tennis player of all time. So, who is? Below is a list of candidates for your consideration. Please look them over and vote in our poll to determine the greatest women's tennis player of all time.
SPORTS
December 26, 2013 | Wire Reports
Serena Williams nearly owned women's tennis in 2013, and the Associated Press took notice by selecting her the female athlete of the year. Williams has won the award three times, tying golfer Annika Sorenstam and tennis player Maureen Connolly. Only track and golf star Babe Didrikson (6) and tennis star Chris Evert (4) have more selections since the award was first given in 1931. Williams was a runaway winner in voting by the media, garnering 55 of 96 votes. Women's basketball player Brittney Griner was second with 14 votes.
SPORTS
December 14, 1989 | JIM MURRAY
It is not characteristic of me to offer advice to (quasi)rival publications, not even my alma mater, Sports Illustrated. But, it has come to my attention, the magazine is casting about for its annual sportsman of the year cover and candidates are coming from all over. I have one for them, the individual I would like to see on the cover of the last issue of the year. It's a West German tennis player who may be the best ever to play the game. Fair-haired, cat-like, No. 1 in the world.
SPORTS
November 6, 2000
Female athletes with notable consecutive-victory streaks: 1. Grete Waitz won five consecutive New York City Marathons. 2. Sonja Henie won 10 consecutive world figure skating championships. 3. Nancy Lopez won five consecutive LPGA events. 4. Peggy Fleming won five consecutive U.S. figure skating titles. 5. Patty Sheehan won four consecutive Nevada Amateur golf titles. 6. Helen Wills Moody did not lose a match for 10 years. (Note: During the 10 years, Wills Moody did not lose a set.
NEWS
January 3, 1998 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Helen Wills Moody, an eight-time Wimbledon champion whose name is evocative of tennis' elegant golden age, has died in Carmel. She was 92. In failing health in recent years, Moody died Thursday at Carmel Convalescent Hospital. Her on-court stoicism, which earned her the nickname "Little Miss Poker Face," gave Moody a tactical advantage during a time when the game had a more genteel atmosphere.
SPORTS
June 8, 1997 | BUD COLLINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sixty-seven years ago Helen Jacobs chased Helen Wills Moody across the Atlantic to the French Championships. They were the two Helens whose exploits were American sports page staples during the 1920s and '30s, when they were known as The Rivals. The confrontations between Moody and Jacobs, though not so frequent, drew as much attention as the latter-day Chris Evert-Martina Navratilova serial. Seven of them came in major finals, four at Wimbledon, and Jacobs won only one, the U.S. final of 1933.
SPORTS
December 14, 1989 | JIM MURRAY
It is not characteristic of me to offer advice to (quasi)rival publications, not even my alma mater, Sports Illustrated. But, it has come to my attention, the magazine is casting about for its annual sportsman of the year cover and candidates are coming from all over. I have one for them, the individual I would like to see on the cover of the last issue of the year. It's a West German tennis player who may be the best ever to play the game. Fair-haired, cat-like, No. 1 in the world.
SPORTS
June 26, 1988 | Lisa Dillman
Whether or not Martina Navratilova wins an unprecedented ninth Wimbledon singles title Saturday, her quest has served to re-focus attention on the 82-year-old co-holder of the record, Helen Wills Moody Roark.
SPORTS
September 30, 1988 | BILL DWYRE
The United States took its time but won its first gold medal in Olympic tennis since Paris in 1924 and the good old days of Helen Wills Moody here Friday, when Pam Shriver and Zina Garrison defeated Jana Novotna and Helena Sukova of Czechoslovakia, 4-6, 6-2, 10-8. Shriver and Garrison finally broke Sukova's serve to go up 9-8, and then Garrison served out the match, but not easily.
SPORTS
July 6, 1989 | From Times wire services
Helen Wills Moody Roark, one of the finest women tennis players of all time, has given the University of California a trust valued at more than $1.5 million to promote biological research, the school announced today. As Helen Wills, she won eight Wimbledon singles championships, seven U.S. singles championships, four French titles, 16 Wightman Cups in the 1920s and 1930s and was an Olympic gold medalist in 1924.
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