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Helene Wickett

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November 3, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In March, the phone rang in pianist Helene Wickett's Northern California home. The management of the Minnesota Symphony wanted to know whether she could play Mozart's Concerto No. 27 with the orchestra and conductor Edo de Waart--on 24 hours' notice. Wickett said yes. Such is the life of a professional trying to make a career from the West Coast. "It was lots of fun," she said in a recent phone interview from her home in Redwood City, San Mateo County.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1990 | CHRIS PASLES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In March, the phone rang in pianist Helene Wickett's Northern California home. The management of the Minnesota Symphony wanted to know whether she could play Mozart's Concerto No. 27 with the orchestra and conductor Edo de Waart--on 24 hours' notice. Wickett said yes. Such is the life of a professional trying to make a career from the West Coast. "It was lots of fun," she said in a recent phone interview from her home in Redwood City, San Mateo County.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1989 | BRUCE BURROUGHS
You can play some of the repertory all of the time and all of the repertory some of the time, but you can't play all of the repertory all of the time. Or so it was, at least, for pianist Helene Wickett Wednesday night in Bing Theater of the County Museum of Art. In a recital sponsored by Pro Musicis that celebrated the 15th anniverary of her Los Angeles debut, Wickett found herself in touch with her personal keyboard Muse only during the second half of her demanding program. Wickett owns real technical resource and endurance, as demonstrated in works of Beethoven, Brahms, Debussy and Dutilleux.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1989 | BRUCE BURROUGHS
You can play some of the repertory all of the time and all of the repertory some of the time, but you can't play all of the repertory all of the time. Or so it was, at least, for pianist Helene Wickett Wednesday night in Bing Theater of the County Museum of Art. In a recital sponsored by Pro Musicis that celebrated the 15th anniverary of her Los Angeles debut, Wickett found herself in touch with her personal keyboard Muse only during the second half of her demanding program. Wickett owns real technical resource and endurance, as demonstrated in works of Beethoven, Brahms, Debussy and Dutilleux.
NEWS
April 12, 1992 | SYBIL BAKER
Who cares if he inhaled or not? Why doesn't he just say he just did what any other guy his age did at least once or twice during those tumultuous years? Words, words, words, words, words, words, words. We feel like the little guy in the New Yorker magazine spot art: walking stoically under an umbrella as words, words, words fill the sky, pelt down, cluster and flatten on top of the umbrella, elongate as they drip off its edges.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 1990 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As the eighth season of the Orange County Chamber Orchestra began Monday night, music director Micah Levy prefaced the Beethoven program with a reference to Goethe's description of the composer as a completely untamed person. And it was with that personality in mind--the man of extremes--that Levy seemed to base his fiery interpretations during the concert at the Irvine Barclay Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1987 | Chris Pasles
Conductor Micah Levy and the Orange County Chamber Orchestra opened their fifth season Sunday at Loyola Marymount University in Orange with a typically strong, individual concert profile. Levy followed the baroque with the modern, then leaped chronologically backward to end with a concerto. It all worked, as the orchestra demonstrated its increasing ensemble mastery.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2001
7:30pm Performance Art Funky bassist-singer Ritt Henn is just off-kilter enough to fit into this evening of performance art and avant-garde music. * "Experimental Mediums," Knitting Factory Alterknit Lounge, 7021 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood, 7:30 p.m. $10. (323) 463-0204. 8pm Pop Music The installation of a new administration figures to do little to quiet rock's agitating impulses. Just a week into the Bush II Era comes "Artspeaks!
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 1985 | MARC SHULGOLD
In conversation, pianist Carol Rosenberger betrays no bitterness--though one couldn't fault her if she did. Those who have followed her career know the story well: As a promising, 20-year-old musician, she was suddenly forced by polio to withdraw from the concert scene for nearly 10 years, thereby missing that crucial period when most reputations are made. "The performances I do now are ones I call the good dates," says Rosenberger, who appears as soloist in Mozart's B-flat Concerto, K.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1990 | JOHN HENKEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The intersection of art and education is a notoriously accident-prone crossroads. The almost inevitable crash between the extremes of popularizing platitudes and intuitive mysteries is seldom pretty to witness. Given the inherent perils, the Beethoven Discovery Weekend that closed the 12th annual Beethoven Festival in San Francisco this year proved a surprisingly enlivening and enlightening event.
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